bankrupt

noun
bank·​rupt | \ ˈbaŋk-(ˌ)rəpt How to pronounce bankrupt (audio) \

Definition of bankrupt

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : a debtor (such as an individual or an organization) whose property is subject to voluntary or involuntary administration under the bankruptcy laws for the benefit of the debtor's creditors
b : a person who becomes insolvent
2 : a person who is completely lacking in a particular desirable quality or attribute a moral bankrupt

bankrupt

adjective

Definition of bankrupt (Entry 2 of 3)

1a : reduced to a state of financial ruin : impoverished specifically : legally declared bankrupt the company went bankrupt
b : of or relating to bankrupts or bankruptcy bankrupt laws
2a : broken, ruined a bankrupt professional career
b : exhausted of valuable qualities : sterile a bankrupt old culture
c : destitute used with of or in bankrupt of all merciful feelings

bankrupt

verb
bankrupted; bankrupting; bankrupts

Definition of bankrupt (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to reduce to bankruptcy
2 : impoverish defections had bankrupted the party of its brainpower

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Synonyms & Antonyms for bankrupt

Synonyms: Adjective

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Adjective

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Choose the Right Synonym for bankrupt

Verb

deplete, drain, exhaust, impoverish, bankrupt mean to deprive of something essential to existence or potency. deplete implies a reduction in number or quantity so as to endanger the ability to function. depleting our natural resources drain implies a gradual withdrawal and ultimate deprivation of what is necessary to an existence. personal tragedy had drained him of all spirit exhaust stresses a complete emptying. her lecture exhausted the subject impoverish suggests a deprivation of something essential to richness or productiveness. impoverished soil bankrupt suggests impoverishment to the point of imminent collapse. war had bankrupted the nation of resources

Examples of bankrupt in a Sentence

Noun As a lawyer, she specialized in working with bankrupts. Adjective The lawsuit could leave them bankrupt. she's a kind soul, but bankrupt of all common sense, I'm afraid Verb Several risky deals bankrupted the company. several bad investments bankrupted him
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The plan is intended to prevent the company from being dissolved, forced into liquidation or formally declared bankrupt. Michelle Toh, CNN, "Thai Airways survives for now as government orders overhaul," 19 May 2020 India was granted independence in 1947 by a Britain left bankrupt after World War II. Cassie Werber, Quartz, "The logic of disrupting public transport to protest climate change," 17 Oct. 2019 Ghosn was sent to Japan by Renault in the late 1990s and is credited with turning around a then near-bankrupt Nissan. Washington Post, "Scandal-hit Nissan’s profits crash amid lower global sales," 12 Nov. 2019 China’s Hong Kong puppet regime, albeit bankrupt of any legitimacy, is still unwilling to cede power to the people. Joshua Wong, Quartz, "How to fight for democracy when the government keeps throwing you in jail," 3 Sep. 2019 From Henry Ford to Donald Trump, America has lionized business leaders (and shameless bankrupts) who disdain history. Walter Shapiro, The New Republic, "1998 Was a Seinfeld Election—Not an Impeachment Referendum," 6 June 2019 That perception came back to bite in big way later in 2008, with the failure of investment bank Lehman Brothers, which went bankrupt on Sept. 15, 2008. Michael S. Derby, WSJ, "New York Fed Says It Wound Down Crisis Bailout Facility With $2.5 Billion Profit," 18 Sep. 2018 After earning $17 million, the men declared the company bankrupt. Jacob Bernstein, New York Times, "The Great Interview Magazine Caper," 16 June 2018 Tarsila, bankrupt, divorced from de Andrade and increasingly Marxist, would veer into a more politically engaged style. Jason Farago, New York Times, "She Led Latin American Art in a Bold New Direction," 15 Feb. 2018 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Campbell became bankrupt in two ways - first gradually, then suddenly. Peter J Reilly, Forbes, "Michael Jackson's Estate Mostly Prevails In Valuation Fight With IRS," 4 May 2021 It must now all seem so long ago to Wibracht, who’s unemployed, bankrupt and possibly headed to federal prison. San Antonio Express-News, "Express Briefing: S.A. lawyer hit with second protective order in a month," 30 Apr. 2021 The eccentric former all-star baseball player turned bankrupt investment advisor on Tuesday morning claimed President Joe Biden’s climate envoy has undermined U.S. foreign policy. Jacob Silverman, The New Republic, "“John Kerry Is a Traitor” Is the Republicans’ New Dumb Meme," 27 Apr. 2021 Carla Squatrito bought a pasta machine and equipment from a bankrupt sausage maker and opened a store in Manchester in 1978, selling manicotti, ravioli and other pastas. Jesse Leavenworth, courant.com, "Wisconsin company purchasing Carla’s Pasta in South Windsor," 23 Apr. 2021 Members of the Sackler family who own bankrupt OxyContin-maker Purdue Pharma LP are worth approximately $11 billion, documents released Tuesday by a congressional committee show. Sara Randazzo, WSJ, "Purdue’s Sackler Family Owners Worth $11 Billion, Documents Show," 20 Apr. 2021 When Cooperstown recognizes the decade in which a proud but bankrupt franchise was restored to glory, the inductees should be Clayton Kershaw and Janet Marie Smith. Bill Shaikin, Los Angeles Times, "Commentary: Dodger Stadium renovations are latest masterpiece designed by Janet Marie Smith," 7 Apr. 2021 And once bankrupt brands are sold, people like the LaBontes are typically left in the dust. New York Times, "The Ghosts of Brooks Brothers," 2 Apr. 2021 The King of France convened the Estates General in 1789—nearly two centuries after it had last been called—for the purpose of levying new taxes, because all those wars had left France bankrupt. Jill Lepore, The New Yorker, "When Constitutions Took Over the World," 22 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Requiring the city to spend $50 million from its budget without identifying the source of the expenditure would bankrupt the city. Andrea Reeves, The Enquirer, "Cecil Thomas: 'I'm running to restore the integrity of the Queen City'," 30 Apr. 2021 For brides who did not wish to bankrupt themselves or burden their bridesmaids with the purchase of dresses in the four-digit price range, McClintock became a go-to label for attractive options. Emily Langer Washington Post, Star Tribune, "Jessica McClintock, designer who outfitted prom-goers and brides, dies at 90," 1 Apr. 2021 The police and fire contracts, long unchallenged, would bankrupt the city within a few decades. New York Times, "Police Unions Won Power Using His Playbook. Now He’s Negotiating the Backlash.," 10 Mar. 2021 This could bankrupt local governments, especially if they are forced to pay interest as well. Star Tribune, "Readers Write: Boulder shooting, Hennepin County minimum wage, Enbridge tax valuations, immigration," 23 Mar. 2021 Even more, left-leaning activists like to accuse Republicans — especially Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, who sponsored the bill — of purposefully creating this expensive program to bankrupt the Postal Service and drive it to privatization. Washington Post, "What you should know about USPS — and how it descended into crisis," 3 Mar. 2021 Finally, while destruction wrought by police could easily bankrupt a homeowner, no municipality would be sent into fiscal distress by offering proper compensation. Andrew Wimer, Forbes, "Police Wrecked An Innocent Woman’s Home And Left Her With The Repair Bill," 12 Mar. 2021 During the last negotiations, city officials claimed the contract would bankrupt San Antonio. New York Times, "Police Unions Won Power Using His Playbook. Now He’s Negotiating the Backlash.," 10 Mar. 2021 Any longer moratorium, however, might just bankrupt a few western state governments. David Freddoso, Washington Examiner, "Biden’s climate czars," 4 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bankrupt.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bankrupt

Noun

1638, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adjective

1565, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

circa 1625, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for bankrupt

Noun

modification of Middle French & Old Italian; Middle French banqueroute bankruptcy, from Old Italian bancarotta, from banca bank + rotta broken, from Latin rupta, feminine of ruptus, past participle of rumpere to break — more at bank, reave

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Time Traveler for bankrupt

Time Traveler

The first known use of bankrupt was in 1565

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Statistics for bankrupt

Cite this Entry

“Bankrupt.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bankrupt. Accessed 12 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for bankrupt

bankrupt

noun

English Language Learners Definition of bankrupt

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: a person, business, etc., that is unable to pay debts

bankrupt

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of bankrupt (Entry 2 of 3)

: unable to pay debts
used to say that someone or something completely lacks a good or desired quality

bankrupt

verb

English Language Learners Definition of bankrupt (Entry 3 of 3)

: to cause (a person, business, etc.) to be unable to pay debts : to make (someone or something) bankrupt

bankrupt

adjective
bank·​rupt | \ ˈbaŋk-ˌrəpt How to pronounce bankrupt (audio) \

Kids Definition of bankrupt

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: not having enough money to pay debts

bankrupt

verb
bankrupted; bankrupting

Kids Definition of bankrupt (Entry 2 of 3)

: to cause to not have enough money to pay debts That last risky deal bankrupted the company.

bankrupt

noun

Kids Definition of bankrupt (Entry 3 of 3)

: a person or business that does not have enough money to pay debts

bankrupt

noun
bank·​rupt | \ ˈbaŋ-ˌkrəpt How to pronounce bankrupt (audio) \

Legal Definition of bankrupt

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: a debtor (as an individual or organization) whose property is subject to administration under the bankruptcy laws for the benefit of the debtor's creditors was adjudicated a bankrupt — see also debtor

bankrupt

adjective

Legal Definition of bankrupt (Entry 2 of 3)

: ruined financially especially : judicially declared a bankrupt the company is bankrupt — compare insolvent

bankrupt

transitive verb

Legal Definition of bankrupt (Entry 3 of 3)

: to reduce to bankruptcy was bankrupted by attorney's fees

Comments on bankrupt

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