bankruptcy

noun
bank·​rupt·​cy | \ˈbaŋk-(ˌ)rəp(t)-sē \
plural bankruptcies

Definition of bankruptcy 

1 : the quality or state of being bankrupt

2 : utter failure or impoverishment

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Synonyms & Antonyms for bankruptcy

Synonyms

failure, insolvency, ruin

Antonyms

solvency

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Examples of bankruptcy in a Sentence

The company is facing bankruptcy. The company was forced into bankruptcy. The number of bankruptcies was especially high last year. Critics view the decision as an example of moral bankruptcy on the part of the administration.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Make-whole payments typically entitle holders of debt to all the interest until maturity if the company refinance the debt or files for bankruptcy. Soma Biswas, WSJ, "Spanish Language Broadcaster LBI Media Files for Bankruptcy," 21 Nov. 2018 The latest sign of the impending fall of the bridal-industrial complex: David’s Bridal, purveyor of mermaid wedding gowns and distinctly vulvar bridesmaid dresses, filed this week for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. E.j. Dickson, Vox, "The bridal retail chain just filed for bankruptcy. It’s been in trouble for a long time.," 20 Nov. 2018 In September 2018, Shipping & Transit LLC (formerly known as ArrivalStar) filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy—voluntary liquidation—but no one seems to have noticed until the Electronic Frontier Foundation pointed it out on October 31. Cyrus Farivar, Ars Technica, "Notorious patent enforcement entity values its entire portfolio at $2, folds," 1 Nov. 2018 After Braniff first filed for bankruptcy in 1982, my mother became a Montessori teacher, and now inspires children to be independent through her stories of exploring far-off lands. Michael Magers, Condé Nast Traveler, "Inside the Sisterhood of Braniff Flight Attendants," 31 Aug. 2018 On September 15, 2008, the bank filed for bankruptcy. Jeff Andrews, Curbed, "10 years after the financial crisis, is the housing market still at risk?," 29 Aug. 2018 In 2017, five other big retailers, including RadioShack, Payless ShoeSource, True Religion Apparel and BCBG Max Azria, also filed for bankruptcy. Fiza Pirani, ajc, "All Toys ‘R’ Us stores in Georgia to close this week," 26 June 2018 Evergrande is trying to push Faraday Future into bankruptcy, which would in turn allow the real estate giant to seize control of the EV startup’s assets and intellectual property, the car company’s lawyers argue in the petition. Sean O'kane, The Verge, "Faraday Future says its main investor is ‘deliberately starving’ it into bankruptcy," 9 Nov. 2018 FirstEnergy, a power corporation whose coal and nuclear units are under Chapter 11 bankruptcy, petitioned the DOE to use this power in April. Megan Geuss, Ars Technica, "Trump’s coal rescue is getting more complicated," 16 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bankruptcy.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bankruptcy

circa 1634, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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Dictionary Entries near bankruptcy

bankroll

bank run

bankrupt

bankruptcy

bankrupt worm

Banks

bankshall

Statistics for bankruptcy

Last Updated

30 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for bankruptcy

The first known use of bankruptcy was circa 1634

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More Definitions for bankruptcy

bankruptcy

noun

Financial Definition of bankruptcy

What It Is

Bankruptcy is a legal process under which a borrower protects and/or liquidates assets in order to repay debts.

How It Works

In general, there are three "types" of bankruptcy, each named after a section of U.S. bankruptcy law. In most cases, a debtor files a petition with the local bankruptcy court. Public companies must also file a form 8-K with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to notify shareholders of the bankruptcy proceedings. The debtor must provide the court with financial and tax information, as well as a list of creditors and outstanding debts. For individuals, courts may also require proof that the person has obtained credit counseling. Filing the bankruptcy petition often automatically stops most collection actions against the debtor, including lawsuits, garnishments and phone calls. Alimony, child support and student loans generally cannot be discharged in any kind of bankruptcy, nor can most judgments against the debtor for criminal acts.

Once the court receives the petition, it usually appoints an impartial trustee who meets with the creditors and works with the debtor to develop a repayment plan. The court often has to approve the plan before the trustee can proceed. The debtor then makes payments to the trustee, who distributes the money to creditors.

Chapter 11
In general, Chapter 11 is for businesses, not individuals. This does not mean it's off limits to individuals, but it does mean that filing Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 is often easier and more favorable for individuals. Most often, individuals who operate sole proprietorships, partnerships or other businesses that are closely intertwined with their personal assets are the best candidates for Chapter 11.

Ultimately, under Chapter 11, a judge decides whether to discharge an individual's debt. The judge can deny the discharge if the debtor failed to keep adequate records, failed to explain the loss of any assets, committed a crime, disobeyed court orders or did not seek credit counseling.

For businesses, the U.S. Trustee (the bankruptcy division of the Justice Department) will appoint one or more committees to represent a company's creditors and shareholders. The committees negotiate with the company to try to get as much of their money back as they can, and this process can take months. The creditors, shareholders and the bankruptcy court must approve the reorganization plan (in some cases, the shareholders vote on the plan), but the court can often overrule everyone and approve the plan anyway. The SEC also reviews the plan to make sure the disclosure is adequate and obeys the law.

Chapter 11 allows existing management to continue running the business (this is referred to as "debtor in possession"), but the bankruptcy court must approve major decisions, such as the sale of a division. During bankruptcy, the company usually will not have to make interest, principal or dividend payments on any of its securities.

The seniority of lenders becomes very important in Chapter 11. Lenders whose debt is backed by collateral are generally repaid first, followed by the unsecured lenders, and finally the shareholders. The reorganization plan may also allow companies to pay lenders with stock (which may be worth substantially less).

Chapter 7
Individuals, partnerships or corporations can file bankruptcy under Chapter 7. Most companies do not file Chapter 7 until they've been unsuccessful with a Chapter 11 filing, which lets them attempt to restructure the company and restore the ability to service debt. In Chapter 7, a company ceases operations and the appointed trustee liquidates the company's assets in order to repay its debts.

Ultimately, for individuals, a judge decides whether to discharge debt. The judge can deny the discharge if the debtor failed to keep adequate records, failed to adequately explain the loss of any assets, committed a crime, disobeyed court orders or did not seek credit counseling.

The law works to prevent people from filing Chapter 7 merely to avoid repaying a debt. This is why not all individuals qualify for Chapter 7, especially those with high monthly incomes or those primarily saddled with consumer debts (i.e., credit card debt). If the individual does not qualify for Chapter 7, the case usually becomes a Chapter 13 case, where the individual must still repay the debt, albeit under a payment plan.

Although the liquidation proceeds go first toward administrative and legal expenses, the seniority of a company's lenders is again very important in Chapter 7. Lenders whose debt is backed by collateral are generally repaid first (via the receipt of the collateral), followed by the unsecured lenders and then the shareholders. In many cases, unsecured bondholders receive only pennies on the dollar. Shareholders almost never receive anything, but if they do, the trustee gives them an opportunity to claim their share.

Chapter 13
Chapter 13, also called a wage-earner's plan, lets individuals attempt to restructure their finances in order to repay their debts. Individuals, the self-employed and those operating unincorporated businesses can file bankruptcy under Chapter 13. Corporations and partnerships cannot.

Chapter 13 is a viable option for people with regular incomes -- it allows debtors to propose installment plans to repay some or all of their debt over three to five years. Alimony, child support and student loans generally cannot be discharged in a Chapter 13 case, nor can most judgments against the debtor for criminal acts. If the debtor wants to keep his house or other assets that serve as collateral to a particular creditor, then the repayment plan needs to specifically address how that creditor will be paid in full within the five years allowed by the Chapter 13 laws. During this time, the debtor cannot take on any new debt without the trustee's permission.

Not all individuals are eligible for Chapter 13; those who have more than a certain amount of debt don't qualify and must file Chapter 11 or Chapter 7. But debtors often choose Chapter 13 over Chapter 11 or Chapter 7 because it helps them avoid foreclosure on their homes by allowing them to catch up on delinquent mortgage payments, and it helps them avoid direct contact with their creditors. A person can emerge from Chapter 13 (that is, be "discharged") if all of the debt is repaid and has completed a financial-management course. After discharge, the debtor's creditors can no longer pursue the debtor for payments or try to collect the discharged obligations.

Why It Matters

Bankruptcy is usually a last resort for individuals and businesses. For individuals, the goal is to get a fresh start by removing debts. However, bankruptcy virtually ruins a person's credit for several years, making it very difficult and expensive to borrow money.

Bankruptcy can be complex and expensive. Creditors involved with a bankrupt borrower bear unusually high risk, and their debts are likely to become worth pennies on the dollar (if that).

Exchanges usually delist companies that stay in bankruptcy beyond a certain time. This is not to say that their shares won't trade again; the listing may simply be moved to the over-the-counter (OTC) market or the Pink Sheets, where the ticker will end with the letter Q (to denote bankruptcy). If a company is able to emerge from bankruptcy, the lenders often become the new owners of the company and the shares of the existing shareholders are usually canceled or at least substantially diluted. But miracles do happen, and companies do pull themselves out of bankruptcy. In these cases, investors can profit substantially. If reorganization proves unsuccessful, however, the company ceases all operations, sells its assets, uses the money to pay off any debt and shuts the doors for good. If a company's stock or bonds are deemed worthless by the bankruptcy court, investors might be able to deduct their losses on their tax returns.

Source: Investing Answers

bankruptcy

noun

English Language Learners Definition of bankruptcy

: the condition of being bankrupt : a condition of financial failure caused by not having the money that you need to pay your debts

: an occurrence in which a person, business, etc., goes bankrupt

: the condition of completely lacking a good or desired quality

bankruptcy

noun
bank·​rupt·​cy | \ˈbaŋk-ˌrəpt-sē \
plural bankruptcies

Kids Definition of bankruptcy

: the state of not having enough money to pay debts The company faces bankruptcy.

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bankruptcy

noun
bank·​rupt·​cy | \ˈbaŋ-ˌkrəp-sē \
plural bankruptcies

Legal Definition of bankruptcy 

1 : the quality or state of a bankrupt filed for bankruptcy

2 : the administration of an insolvent debtor's property by the court for the benefit of the debtor's creditors the debt was discharged in bankruptcy bankruptcy proceedings — see also adequate protection, Bankruptcy Code — compare insolvency, receivership

Note: Bankruptcy protects the debtor from debt collection by creditors. A debtor may file for bankruptcy, which is called “voluntary bankruptcy,” or a creditor may petition the court to declare the debtor bankrupt, which is called “involuntary bankruptcy.” Involuntary bankruptcy is allowed only under chapter 7 or chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. There are four types of relief available to individuals or corporations under the Bankruptcy Code: liquidation (chapter 7), reorganization (chapter 11), debt adjustment for a family farmer or fisherman (chapter 12), and debt adjustment for an individual with a regular income (chapter 13). Municipalities may file for bankruptcy under chapter 9. The court determines which debts are to be repaid according to their priority, and the debtor is typically granted a discharge from unpaid debts that are dischargeable under the Bankruptcy Code.

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