admire

verb
ad·​mire | \ əd-ˈmī(-ə)r How to pronounce admire (audio) \
admired; admiring

Definition of admire

transitive verb

1 : to feel respect and approval for (someone or something) : to regard with admiration They all admired her courage.
2 archaic : to marvel at

intransitive verb

dialect : to like very much … I would admire to know why not …— A. H. Lewis

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Other Words from admire

admirer noun

Choose the Right Synonym for admire

regard, respect, esteem, admire mean to recognize the worth of a person or thing. regard is a general term that is usually qualified. he is highly regarded in the profession respect implies a considered evaluation or estimation. after many years they came to respect her views esteem implies greater warmth of feeling accompanying a high valuation. no citizen of the town was more highly esteemed admire suggests usually enthusiastic appreciation and often deep affection. a friend that I truly admire

Examples of admire in a Sentence

We gazed out the window and admired the scenery. I admire the way you handled such a touchy situation.

Recent Examples on the Web

The Trump-Kennedy fashion comparisons continue, especially on Fox News and by a Trump-admiring Twitter account, FLOTUS Report, which pointed out their scarf-wearing similarities during the Trumps' visit to Ireland last week. Maria Puente, USA TODAY, "President Trump likens first lady Melania Trump to 'Jackie O' but Twitter objects," 14 June 2019 Indeed, a Boris-Trump alliance could rewrite much of the pre-Brexit logic and diplomatic landscape, two self-admiring charismatic populists with similar agendas, albeit with polar opposite lexicons. Nic Robertson, CNN, "The week that finally laid bare the Brexit myths," 9 June 2019 In his detour as a media commentator, Griffin seemed to really admire Ingram’s game among the other young Lakers. Kyle Goon, Orange County Register, "Purple & Bold: Anthony Davis rumors are circling again. Here’s what’s changed.," 6 June 2019 Justice O’Connor is rarely if ever wrong about anything; the book is rife with the admiring recollections of former clerks and longtime friends. Barton Swaim, WSJ, "Politics: Dangers of Results-Oriented Jurisprudence," 22 Mar. 2019 In many cases, this year's winners have also humanized things by placing the night sky in context, framed by other figures admiring it or nestled among familiar-looking landscapes. John Timmer, Ars Technica, "Some good came out of 2018: Astronomy photos," 11 Nov. 2018 The Cottagers' stylish brand of football has attracted many admiring glances and some of them appear to be coming from Fulham's West London rivals Chelsea, who are eyeing Jokanovic as a possible replacement for Antonio Conte. SI.com, "Pedro Praises 'Great Manager' Slavisa Jokanovic Amid Chelsea Interest in Fulham Boss," 8 June 2018 The couple had admired each other from afar before officially being introduced via the social media platform in 2015. Essence, "Bridal Bliss: Tiffany and Alyssa Went From DMs To 'I Do'," 5 June 2019 The candidate instantly admired their emotional power. Matt Flegenheimer, New York Times, "Biden’s First Run for President Was a Calamity. Some Missteps Still Resonate.," 3 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'admire.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of admire

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 2

History and Etymology for admire

borrowed from Middle French admirer, Latinization of amirer "to make (little or much) of," borrowed from Latin admīrārī, ammīrārī "to regard with wonder, show esteem for," from ad- ad- + mīrārī "to be surprised, look with wonder at," derivative of mīrus, "remarkable, amazing," of uncertain origin

Note: Regarding etymology of Latin mīrus see note at smile entry 1.

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Statistics for admire

Last Updated

24 Jun 2019

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Time Traveler for admire

The first known use of admire was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for admire

admire

verb
ad·​mire | \ əd-ˈmīr How to pronounce admire (audio) \
admired; admiring

Kids Definition of admire

: to think very highly of : feel admiration for

Other Words from admire

admirer noun

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More from Merriam-Webster on admire

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with admire

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for admire

Spanish Central: Translation of admire

Nglish: Translation of admire for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of admire for Arabic Speakers

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