adjunct

noun
ad·​junct | \ ˈa-ˌjəŋ(k)t How to pronounce adjunct (audio) \

Definition of adjunct

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : something joined or added to another thing but not essentially a part of it The website is designed as an adjunct to the book.
2 grammar
a : a word or word group that qualifies or completes the meaning of another word or other words and is not itself a main structural element in its sentence
b : an adverb or adverbial phrase (such as heartily in "They ate heartily" or at noon in "We left at noon") attached to the verb of a clause especially to express a relation of time, place, frequency, degree, or manner — compare disjunct sense 2
3a : an associate or assistant of another
b : an adjunct faculty member at a college or university (see adjunct entry 2 sense 2)

adjunct

adjective

Definition of adjunct (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : added or joined as an accompanying object or circumstance
2 : attached in a subordinate or temporary capacity to a staff an adjunct professor

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Other Words from adjunct

Noun

adjunctive \ a-​ˈjəŋ(k)-​tiv How to pronounce adjunctive (audio) , ə-​ \ adjective

Adjective

adjunctly \ ˈa-​ˌjəŋ(k)-​tlē How to pronounce adjunctly (audio) , -​ˌjəŋk-​lē \ adverb

Breaking Down Adjunct

With its prefix, ad-, meaning "to or toward", adjunct implies that one thing is "joined to" another. A car wash may be operated as an adjunct to a gas station. An adjunct professor is one who's attached to the college without being a full member of the salaried faculty. And anyone trying to expand his or her vocabulary will find that daily reading of a newspaper is a worthwhile adjunct to actual vocabulary study.

Examples of adjunct in a Sentence

Noun Because Joseph Ellis has been an outspoken critic of social and women's history, he appears a peculiar choice to write the foreword, despite his many publications on the Revolutionary era. Unsurprisingly, perhaps, he treats Abigail here more as her husband's adjunct and supporter than as her own woman. — Anthony Lewis, New York Times Book Review, 4 Nov. 2007 As an adjunct to its basic educational role, the public library will increasingly serve as an access point to the resources of other libraries as well as to nonlibrary sources of publicly available information. — Fred Lerner, The Story of Libraries, (1945) 1998 In A.D. 400 western Europe was merely a geographic expression. Roman civilization was centered on the Mediterranean, and France, England, and the Rhine valley were mere adjuncts of the Mediterranean world. — Norman F. Cantor, The Civilization of the Middle Ages, 1993 Massage therapy can be used as an adjunct along with the medication. In “They ate heartily,” the word heartily is an adjunct and in “We left at noon,” the phrase at noon is an adjunct. Adjective But it's Sainte-Marie's less-well-known life as a computer geek—and an adjunct professor of digital art, Native American studies, and philosophy at several universities—that brings her to midtown Manhattan today. — Ophira Edut, Ms., August/September 1999 There is a terrible shortage of jobs in the universities, where, increasingly, men and women with Ph.D.s hang on to various forms of underpaid adjunct posts. Believe me, it happens at Harvard, too. — Martin Peretz, New Republic, 5 July 1999 Using his chauffeur-driven car as an adjunct office, the designer shuttles among the design ateliers of his three major collections: the one that bears his name; Chanel, and, after a seven-year hiatus, Chloé. — Carrie Donovan, New York Times Magazine, 11 Oct. 1992 massage therapy as an adjunct treatment
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In a tradition that dated back decades, the agency had also used adjunct advisory panels to furnish additional expertise for those assessments. Sean Reilly, Science | AAAS, "Dismissed EPA science advisers gather in ‘unprecedented’ challenge to Trump administration," 10 Oct. 2019 But, of course, there are some adjunct-heavy beers as a nod to current tastes, including one made with granola. Josh Noel, chicagotribune.com, "Goose Island Bourbon County beers in 2019 focus on whiskey barrels and one made with — granola?," 14 Aug. 2019 In 1970, adjuncts made up 20 percent of all higher education faculty. Philip Eil, BostonGlobe.com, "Consumers called out Nike and Uber for their labor conditions. Now, it’s time to shame colleges," 17 July 2019 Nearly 95 percent of the 4,500 faculty at UMUC are adjuncts, a much higher share than any other school in the University System of Maryland. Danielle Douglas-gabriel, Washington Post, "‘UMUC is not like everybody else’: Tensions flare over school’s direction," 16 June 2019 Mark Kirchner is a photography adjunct instructor at Soka University. Ada Tseng, latimes.com, "Tom Tully never knew he had a Hollywood star. His grandchildren found it decades after his death," 10 July 2019 The school also retains a god-like control over the schedules of adjuncts, who are literally laid off after every single semester, and then rehired as necessary for the following semester. Aaron Gilbreath, Longreads, "How College Professors Are Fighting for Their Lives," 25 June 2019 Most schools cap adjuncts at four classes per semester, hence the multiple institutions. Aaron Gilbreath, Longreads, "How College Professors Are Fighting for Their Lives," 25 June 2019 Qatar, by contrast, seems to use its fund as an adjunct to diplomacy. The Economist, "Gulf states are becoming more adventurous investors," 14 June 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective In addition to his position at the Kelley School, Rasmusen also serves as an adjunct professor of economics in the IU College of Arts and Sciences. Arika Herron And Michael Reschke, Indianapolis Star, "Indiana University provost: Professor's tweets are 'racist, sexist and homophobic'," 20 Nov. 2019 There’s not a lot of salt and spice and adjunct flavors to get in the way. Mike Sutter, ExpressNews.com, "Top 5 rotisserie chickens from San Antonio grocery stores," 23 Sep. 2019 Very big breweries were making virtually a single style of beer: light-bodied lagers, often brewed with adjunct grains like rice or corn. Theresa Mcculla, Smithsonian, "Here’s What’s Brewing in the New Smithsonian Beer Collections," 16 Sep. 2019 Some researchers are even looking into whether it could be used as an adjunct treatment for opioid addiction. Kaitlyn Frey, PEOPLE.com, "Kim Kardashian Uses CBD to Help Her Fall Asleep, Says She Wouldn't Take 'Xanax or Ambien Again'," 13 Sep. 2019 The other thing re all of the adjunct things around the sport—coaching, equipment, training methods and techniques. Jamie Lisanti, SI.com, "Catching Up with Paula Newby-Fraser Ahead of the 2019 Ironman World Championships," 1 Aug. 2019 Montgomery, an adjunct professor at the University of Colorado Denver and president of Aurora’s NAACP chapter, has not yet commented. John Aguilar, The Denver Post, "Mike Coffman declares victory in Aurora mayor’s race," 14 Nov. 2019 Bob Kocher is an investor at Venrock, a senior fellow at the University of Southern California Schaeffer Center, and an adjunct professor at Stanford University. Megan Blewett, Fortune, "How to Cure the Antibiotic Industry’s Profitability Infection," 14 Nov. 2019 Simmons held a private law practice for 20 years, has served as an adjunct professor at St. Mary's Law School and has been a religious education teacher at her church. Scott Huddleston, ExpressNews.com, "New fundraising director tapped for San Antonio missions," 7 Nov. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'adjunct.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of adjunct

Noun

1554, in the meaning defined at sense 3a

Adjective

1516, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for adjunct

Noun

borrowed from Latin adjunctum "concomitant factor," from neuter of adjunctus adjunct entry 2

Adjective

borrowed from Latin adjunctus, past participle of adjungere "to link up, join, add, attach" — more at adjoin

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Time Traveler for adjunct

Time Traveler

The first known use of adjunct was in 1516

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Statistics for adjunct

Last Updated

20 Nov 2019

Cite this Entry

“Adjunct.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/adjunctive. Accessed 6 December 2019.

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More Definitions for adjunct

adjunct

noun
How to pronounce adjunct (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of adjunct

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: something that is joined or added to another thing but is not an essential part of it
grammar : a word or phrase (such as an adverb or prepositional phrase) that provides added information about the meaning of a verb in a sentence by expressing a relation of time, place, manner, etc.

adjunct

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of adjunct (Entry 2 of 2)

: added or joined in order to be used with something
: added to a teaching staff for only a short time or in a lower position than other staff

adjunct

noun
ad·​junct | \ ˈaj-ˌəŋ(k)t How to pronounce adjunct (audio) \

Medical Definition of adjunct

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a person associated with or assisting another in some duty or service
2 : adjuvant sense b drugs used as short-term adjuncts in weight-loss programs

adjunct

adjective

Medical Definition of adjunct (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : added or joined as an accompanying object or circumstance
2 : attached in a subordinate or temporary capacity to a staff an adjunct psychiatrist

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Comments on adjunct

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