adamant

adjective
ad·​a·​mant | \ ˈa-də-mənt How to pronounce adamant (audio) , -ˌmant\

Definition of adamant

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: unshakable or insistent especially in maintaining a position or opinion : unyielding an adamant insistence on doing things his own way was adamant about making the change

adamant

noun
ad·​a·​mant | \ ˈa-də-mənt How to pronounce adamant (audio) , -ˌmant\

Definition of adamant (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a stone (such as a diamond) formerly believed to be of impenetrable hardness
2 : an unbreakable or extremely hard substance "Trust not in your gold and silver, trust not in your high fortresses; for, though the walls were of iron, and the fortresses of adamant, the Most High shall put terror into your hearts and weakness into your councils …"— George Eliot

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from adamant

Adjective

adamantly adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for adamant

Adjective

inflexible, obdurate, adamant mean unwilling to alter a predetermined course or purpose. inflexible implies rigid adherence or even slavish conformity to principle. inflexible in their demands obdurate stresses hardness of heart and insensitivity to appeals for mercy or the influence of divine grace. obdurate in his refusal to grant clemency adamant implies utter immovability in the face of all temptation or entreaty. adamant that the work should continue

The Meaning and History of Adamant

A person who is adamant about something has formed an opinion or taken a position that is not going to change because the person is determined to keep that opinion or position. If you're adamant about a decision you've made, no one can convince you that it was a mistake. If you're adamant that something be done (or not be done), you insist that it be (or not be) so.

The adjective dates to the early 1800s but it comes from a much older—and now much less common—noun. An adamant is an imaginary stone of impenetrable hardness. Historically, the word applied to actual stones (and other substances) believed to be impenetrable; in the 17th century the word was used as a synonym of diamond. The noun adamant comes from a Latin word meaning "material of extreme hardness, diamond."

One side note: however adamant the Adams in your life tend to be, the name Adam is not related etymologically to the word adamant. Adam comes from the Hebrew word 'āḏām, meaning "human being."

Examples of adamant in a Sentence

Adjective

I am keen not to share my genetic code with my insurer, I am keen that my doctor should know it and use it, but I am adamant to the point of fanaticism that it is my decision. — Matt Ridley, Genome, 1999 Arrive to find child physically intact but … adamant that he will not remain another minute in Ski Bunny program. Despite their 'professionalism,' staff members eagerly concur. — Christopher Buckley, New Yorker, 10 Mar. 1997 In the years following the First World War, the debts of our wartime allies and others came to be considered a serious burden on international commerce and well-being. Calvin Coolidge was adamant on repayment. — John Kenneth Galbraith, New Yorker, 21 Apr. 1986 We've tried to talk him into coming with us, but he's adamant about staying here. remained adamant about getting the actor's autograph even after he had disappeared backstage
See More

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

Some boob-havers swore by the *clasp in the back* technique, while others were adamant about the *clasp in the front, spin it around and then put your arms through it* strategy. Kelsey Stiegman, Seventeen, "Don't Panic, But You've Been Wearing Your Bra Wrong Your Entire Life," 25 Apr. 2019 Plus, Little People, Big World was filming, and the crew was adamant about getting their wedding day on camera for the show. Michelle Manetti, Good Housekeeping, "5 Times Jeremy and Audrey Roloff's Book 'A Love Letter Life' Got Extremely Real," 12 Apr. 2019 And this is the reason why Congress and why the senators have been so adamant for calling a special counsel to investigate this. Fox News, "Gorka on New Mexico compound case 'travesty'," 15 Aug. 2018 Blonder is adamant that these are just useful tips, colored by his personal preferences, and that there is plenty of room for adaptation if your tastes happen to differ. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "The secret to successful BBQ pork butt and brisket is science," 1 Sep. 2018 And although the Patriots might have lost this year’s Super Bowl to the Eagles, one apparent New England fan seemed adamant to remind spectators of the team’s epic comeback the year before. Jaclyn Reiss, BostonGlobe.com, "A look at the signs along the 2018 Boston Marathon route," 16 Apr. 2018 But the owners were adamant that Silver Dollar City not become a generic amusement park. Arthur Levine, USA TODAY, "Silver Dollar City theme park offers old-fashioned fun and thrills," 25 Apr. 2018 The Swiss bank is adamant there will be no more cuts to trading. Paul J. Davies, WSJ, "Credit Suisse Has Rich People’s Problems in Markets," 14 Feb. 2019 But all that Googling, Oprah said, left her in adamant disbelief that she could be healed with a regimen as simple as drinking water and sucking on lemons. Andrea Park, SELF, "Oprah Winfrey Made the Very Human Mistake of Google-Diagnosing the Lump in Her Neck," 10 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'adamant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of adamant

Adjective

1816, in the meaning defined above

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for adamant

Adjective

derivative of adamant entry 2

Noun

Middle English, "diamond, material of extreme hardness, lodestone," borrowed from Anglo-French, borrowed from Latin adamant-, adamās "material of extreme hardness, diamond," borrowed from Greek adamant-, adámas, probably a borrowing from a substratal or Near Eastern source, conformed by folk etymology to a- a- entry 2 and the stem of the verb dámnēmi "(I) tame, subdue, conquer"

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about adamant

Statistics for adamant

Last Updated

16 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for adamant

The first known use of adamant was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for adamant

adamant

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of adamant

: not willing to change an opinion or decision : very determined

adamant

adjective
ad·​a·​mant | \ ˈa-də-mənt How to pronounce adamant (audio) \

Kids Definition of adamant

: not giving in I tried to change her mind, but she was adamant.

Keep scrolling for more

More from Merriam-Webster on adamant

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with adamant

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for adamant

Spanish Central: Translation of adamant

Nglish: Translation of adamant for Spanish Speakers

Comments on adamant

What made you want to look up adamant? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

using a distributed computer network

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Time Traveler Quiz: Which Word Came First?

  • time traveler quiz which word came first
  • Which came first?
Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Syn City

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!