acrimonious

adjective
ac·​ri·​mo·​ni·​ous | \ ˌa-krə-ˈmō-nē-əs How to pronounce acrimonious (audio) \

Definition of acrimonious

: angry and bitter : caustic, biting, or rancorous especially in feeling, language, or manner an acrimonious dispute

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Other Words from acrimonious

acrimoniously adverb
acrimoniousness noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for acrimonious

Synonyms

Antonyms

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Examples of acrimonious in a Sentence

Each man came out of their acrimonious 200-meter showdown on July 23 with an injured hamstring and a decidedly negative vibe. — Tim Layden, Sports Illustrated, 11 Sept. 2000 My May 19, 1967, memorandum to the president unleashed a storm of controversy.  … It led to tense and acrimonious Senate hearings that pitted me against the Joint Chiefs of Staff and generated rumors they intended to resign en masse. — Robert McNamara, In Retrospect, 1995 But considering the momentousness of the issue, the original Darwinian debate was far less acrimonious than might have been expected … — Gertrude Himmelfarb, American Scholar, Autumn 1981 We could tell, however, when debate became more acrimonious than professional, but this was from watching lawyers other than our father. — Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird, 1960 He went through an acrimonious divorce. an acrimonious parting between the two former friends
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Recent Examples on the Web Gaspard suggests our situation could have been more precarious and stomach-curdling if the kids were younger, the divorce acrimonious or my new relationship not yet solidified. Washington Post, 28 May 2021 Negotiations grew acrimonious, and the two sides couldn’t agree on a price. Renee Dudley, ProPublica, 24 May 2021 The group had a pretty acrimonious breakup in 1985. Gary Graff, cleveland, 10 May 2021 The protests that followed Mr. Floyd’s death became part of the increasingly acrimonious American conversation over politics. New York Times, 20 Apr. 2021 Against the backdrop of a pandemic’s blight and wounds from an acrimonious election, a group of acclaimed actors on Sunday will stage an online reading of a religious text with remarkable relevance to the current moment: the Book of Job. Elana Schor And Andrew Welsh-huggins, chicagotribune.com, 6 Dec. 2020 Last week, Kansas City mayor Quinton Lucas proposed, and the City Council promptly passed, an overhaul of the city police department’s budget, thereby igniting an acrimonious debate. Charles Fain Lehman, National Review, 28 May 2021 The clash between religious and LGBTQ rights is one of the most acrimonious in U.S. politics. Harry Bruinius, The Christian Science Monitor, 13 May 2021 Indeed, despite their fairy tale start on the ABC dating show, Randolph and Underwood's breakup, though initially amicable, grew exceedingly acrimonious. Aili Nahas, PEOPLE.com, 21 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'acrimonious.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of acrimonious

1651, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for acrimonious

acrimony + -ous

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Time Traveler for acrimonious

Time Traveler

The first known use of acrimonious was in 1651

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Statistics for acrimonious

Last Updated

14 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Acrimonious.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/acrimonious. Accessed 21 Jun. 2021.

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