Trend Watch

New Movie Drives Spikes on 'Acrimony'

Lookups have risen throughout March 2018


Acrimony has periodically been among our top lookups throughout much of March 2018, especially during the hours of prime time television as high-profile advertisements for Acrimony, a new film by director Tyler Perry and starring Taraji P. Henson, have aired.

A woman can only take so much betrayal before she pushes back — and Taraji P. Henson is pushing back with full force in the final trailer for Acrimony.
— Nick Romano, Entertainment Weekly (ew.com), 8 Feb. 2018

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Photo: Tomdog

'Acrimony' traces back to the Latin word 'ācer,' meaning "sharp, biting, keen."

We define acrimony as "anger and bitterness : harsh or biting sharpness especially of words, manner, or feelings." Before the word had a meaning which enabled it to titularly function for a psychological thriller, acrimony was used in the sense "bitterness or sharpness especially to the taste" (it came to English in the 16th century from Middle French, and can be traced before that back to the Latin word ācer, meaning "sharp, biting, keen").

The sayd gumme is put into Collyres, and medicines that are made for the eyes, to take away the acrimonie and sharpnesse of the same: it doth also stoppe the pores and conduites of the skinne.
— Rembert Dodoens (trans. by Henry Lyte Esquyer), A Niewe Herball, 1578

Acrimony is occasionally used in the plural, in which case the word is rendered as acrimonies. The adjectival form is acrimonious.



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