worship

verb
wor·​ship | \ ˈwər-shəp also ˈwȯr- \
worshipped also worshiped; worshipping also worshiping

Definition of worship

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to honor or show reverence for as a divine being or supernatural power
2 : to regard with great or extravagant respect, honor, or devotion a celebrity worshipped by her fans

intransitive verb

: to perform or take part in worship or an act of worship

worship

noun

Definition of worship (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : reverence offered a divine being or supernatural power also : an act of expressing such reverence
2 : a form of religious practice with its creed and ritual
3 : extravagant respect or admiration for or devotion to an object of esteem worship of the dollar
4 chiefly British : a person of importance used as a title for various officials (such as magistrates and some mayors)

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Other Words from worship

Verb

worshipper or less commonly worshiper noun

Choose the Right Synonym for worship

Verb

revere, reverence, venerate, worship, adore mean to honor and admire profoundly and respectfully. revere stresses deference and tenderness of feeling. a professor revered by her students reverence presupposes an intrinsic merit and inviolability in the one honored and a similar depth of feeling in the one honoring. reverenced the academy's code of honor venerate implies a holding as holy or sacrosanct because of character, association, or age. heroes still venerated worship implies homage usually expressed in words or ceremony. worships their memory adore implies love and stresses the notion of an individual and personal attachment. we adored our doctor

Examples of worship in a Sentence

Verb

Many ancient cultures worshipped the sun and moon. They worship at this temple. I worship God in my own way.

Noun

worship of gods and goddesses Worship services are held daily. the media's worship of celebrities
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The classic trainers have been widely beloved for decades, particularly worshipped by fashion people for their clean, minimal lines (Phoebe Philo and Raf Simons are noted devotees). Monica Kim, Vogue, "A New Photo Book Celebrates the Iconic Stan Smith—Both Man and Shoe," 31 Aug. 2018 Viewed now, the 1975 film seems a creepily voyeuristic exemplar of the male gaze, its teenage characters worshiped by the camera to an extent thoroughly objectifies and reduces them to not-so-subtly erotic décor. John Anderson, WSJ, "‘Picnic at Hanging Rock’ Review: No Walk in the Park," 24 May 2018 He was liked by some colleagues and worshiped by the rest. Steve Rubenstein, San Francisco Chronicle, "Longtime journalist Frank McCulloch, former Examiner managing editor, dies at 98," 15 May 2018 The Goddess Kumari is one of the most popular deities in the valley, worshipped equally by Hindus and Buddhists. Antonia Neubauer, Town & Country, "How to Plan a Trip to Asia," 5 Oct. 2016 Other cultures see the loose-fitting robe as a symbol of royalty, but in the fashion world, style mavens worship the lightweight tunic for its humidity-friendly airiness and jet-setting packability. Amber Elliott, Houston Chronicle, "I dream of caftans," 23 May 2018 Mark Ronson, one of the writer-producers behind the track, properly worshipped Gaga in his speech. Christopher Rosa, Glamour, "The Biggest Moments From the 2019 Golden Globes," 6 Jan. 2019 Before then, the Druids worshipped oak trees as their idol. Nicol Natale, Woman's Day, "Why Do We Have Christmas Trees?," 15 Nov. 2018 Our culture worships the criminal, not the victims. Courtney Lund O’neil, Harper's BAZAAR, "A Serial Killer, a Receipt, and My Mom: Haunted by the Murder of 33 Boys," 31 Oct. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The 1970s witnessed a flourishing of experimentation in black Catholic worship styles, as gospel and jazz music, West African drumming and dance, and black Protestant preaching styles all found their way into Catholic Masses. Smithsonian, "The History of Black Catholics in America," 8 June 2018 Such individual worship is probably why Ronaldo ever appeared in the starting lineup at all. SI.com, "Ronaldo's 1998 Seizure & World Cup Final Appearance Remains One of Football's Greatest Mysteries," 1 June 2018 The path toward open worship in the U.A.E. hasn’t been without its bumps. Asa Fitch, WSJ, "In Arab Nation, Christians, Buddhists and Jews Emerge to Worship," 27 Jan. 2019 Teenage idol worship is nothing new in the world of music. Morgan Jerkins, Teen Vogue, "R. Kelly and Other Powerful Men Have Always Manipulated Their Teen Fans," 9 Jan. 2019 Among the new ones Sunday was Expression of the Cross, a combination of the worship group and choir from Cross Church of East Chicago. Michelle L. Quinn, Post-Tribune, "Gospel music fest lifts spirits, sheet music," 25 June 2018 In recent months, Chinese authorities have renewed their efforts in cracking down on unauthorized houses of worship. Violet Law, The Seattle Times, "Advocate of China-Vatican dialogue named Hong Kong bishop," 7 Jan. 2019 Their aura of secrecy—mandated by Venetian law, which forbade any exterior sign for Jewish houses of worship—made them seem all the more precious. Leslie Camhi, ELLE Decor, "Inside the World's Most Beautiful Synagogues," 5 Nov. 2018 Carl Rhodes, co-author of the book CEO Society, notes that CEO worship has even spread to us as individuals. Rebecca Jennings, Vox, "CEOs have never been more idolized. 5 experts explain why that’s a problem.," 29 Nov. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'worship.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of worship

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 4

History and Etymology for worship

Noun

Middle English worshipe worthiness, respect, reverence paid to a divine being, from Old English weorthscipe worthiness, respect, from weorth worthy, worth + -scipe -ship

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Statistics for worship

Last Updated

17 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for worship

The first known use of worship was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for worship

worship

verb

English Language Learners Definition of worship

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to honor or respect (someone or something) as a god
: to show respect and love for God or for a god especially by praying, having religious services, etc.
: to love or honor (someone or something) very much or too much

worship

noun

English Language Learners Definition of worship (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act of showing respect and love for a god especially by praying with other people who believe in the same god : the act of worshipping God or a god
: excessive admiration for someone
British used as a title when addressing or referring to certain officials (such as mayors and magistrates) used with his, her, your, or their

worship

noun
wor·​ship | \ ˈwər-shəp \

Kids Definition of worship

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : deep respect toward God, a god, or a sacred object
2 : too much respect or admiration

worship

verb
worshipped also worshiped; worshipping also worshiping

Kids Definition of worship (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to honor or respect as a divine being
2 : to regard with respect, honor, or devotion She worships her son.
3 : to take part in worship or an act of worship

Other Words from worship

worshipper or worshiper noun

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Comments on worship

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