adoration

noun

ad·​o·​ra·​tion ˌa-də-ˈrā-shən How to pronounce adoration (audio)
: the act of adoring : the state of being adored

Examples of adoration in a Sentence

They looked at the baby in adoration. The doctor has earned the adoration of his patients.
Recent Examples on the Web The college crowd was full of adoration for their triumphant team but perhaps the biggest cheer of the whole event came when Staley confirmed that class was closed for the rest of the day. Jill Martin, CNN, 9 Apr. 2024 The recipient of his adoration is a 14-year-old girl; the old man pays to watch her sleep. Michael Greenberg, New York Times, 10 Mar. 2024 Naturally, my contributions veered towards an adoration for journalism—an indispensable facet of our future—mixed feelings towards social media, and an aversion towards the latest hardware trends. Kylie Robison, Fortune, 15 Mar. 2024 Falling for Paul was akin to having earned the respectability to be seen and feel worthy of someone’s adoration. Cathleen Calkins, Los Angeles Times, 8 Mar. 2024 An hour of adoration was held to honor the family Thursday. Andrea Klick, Kansas City Star, 15 Feb. 2024 Earlier this month at the Kennedy Center Honors taping, Crystal, 75, spoke to red carpet reporters about his adoration for the Jumanji star. Angel Saunders, Peoplemag, 29 Dec. 2023 In the realm of popular music, few artists command the level of influence and adoration that Beyoncé does. Cheryl Robinson, Forbes, 26 Feb. 2024 His adoration is clear on screen, and many of the show’s highlights are faithfully recreated in live-action, from the crowded streets of the Earth Kingdom city Omashu to the ethereal forests of the Spirit World. Devan Coggan, EW.com, 22 Feb. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'adoration.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

borrowed from Middle French & Latin; Middle French, borrowed from Latin adōrātiōn-, adōrātiō, from adōrāre "to venerate, adore" + -tiōn-, -tiō, suffix of verbal action

First Known Use

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of adoration was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near adoration

Cite this Entry

“Adoration.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/adoration. Accessed 20 Apr. 2024.

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