wobble

verb
wob·​ble | \ ˈwä-bəl How to pronounce wobble (audio) \
variants: or less commonly
wobbled also wabbled; wobbling also wabbling\ ˈwä-​b(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce wabbling (audio) \

Definition of wobble

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a : to move or proceed with an irregular rocking or staggering motion or unsteadily and clumsily from side to side

transitive verb

: to cause to wobble

wobble

noun
variants: or less commonly wabble

Definition of wobble (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : a hobbling or rocking unequal motion (as of a wheel unevenly mounted)
b : an uncertainly directed movement
2 : an intermittent variation (as in volume of sound)

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Other Words from wobble

Verb

wobbler or less commonly wabbler \ ˈwä-​b(ə-​)lər How to pronounce wabbler (audio) \ noun
wobbliness or less commonly wabbliness \ ˈwä-​blē-​nəs How to pronounce wabbliness (audio) \ noun
wobbly or less commonly wabbly \ ˈwä-​b(ə-​)lē How to pronounce wabbly (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for wobble

Synonyms: Verb

agitate, bucket, convulse, jerk, jiggle, joggle, jolt, jounce, judder [chiefly British], quake, quiver, shake, shudder, vibrate

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Examples of wobble in a Sentence

Verb

The vase wobbled but didn't fall over. The boy was wobbling along on his bicycle. The table wobbles a little. They have been wobbling in their support of the president's policies.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

In my experience playing a press preview of the game, there were only a few bugs (mostly funny ones, like corpses wobbling in midair), and the game retains the series’s recent level of polish. T.c. Sottek, The Verge, "Battlefield V’s single-player stories are the right way to do war games," 20 Nov. 2018 Now, do the same squat with a free weight, and suddenly your muscles have to work to keep you from wobbling and your body doesn’t have to move any fixed path. SELF, "Your Guide to Navigating the Free Weights at the Gym," 12 Jan. 2019 Only that when the game wobbled strangely out of balance, the steadiest hand on the court came to correct it. Rob Mahoney, SI.com, "LeBron James Saves a Season on the Brink," 26 Apr. 2018 Glossy black candlesticks by Aesa and shimmering Tom Dixon light fixtures suggest movement, as though they’ve just been blopped down on the table or, like soap bubbles, are wobbling through the air. Eliza Brooke, Vox, "Some people feel a tenderness toward bulbous candles and planters. Why?," 21 Dec. 2018 This will be familiar to anyone who has tried to walk on a fast-moving train and needed to find steady footing as the train wobbled from side to side. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "New study sheds more light on what caused Millennium Bridge to wobble," 30 Oct. 2018 Despite the low-key approach, and even as other tech firms’ shares wobbled, there was plenty of interest. The Economist, "Spotify makes its stockmarket debut," 4 Apr. 2018 The Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 dropped less than 0.2% as Tuesday’s trading session wrapped up after wobbling around the flatline most of the day. David Hodari, WSJ, "U.S. Stocks Close Lower as Investors Wait for Next Steps on Trade," 26 Feb. 2019 Spread mixture on top of crust and bake until edge is set and center still wobbles slightly, 35 to 40 minutes. The Good Housekeeping Test Kitchen, Good Housekeeping, "Strawberry Coconut-Crust Cheesecake," 11 Mar. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Instead, the existence of the planets is calculated from indirect observations, such as measuring changes in host stars’ brightness or tracking little wobbles caused by the gravitational tug of the bodies orbiting them. Jason Daley, Smithsonian, "Astronomers Snap a Rare Picture of Two Baby Planets," 7 June 2019 That includes a seismographic sensors, a subsurface temperature probe, an experiment to measure the planet's wobble, and a robotic arm to deploy them. Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics, "NASA's Mars InSight Lander Just Nailed Another Major Milestone," 27 Nov. 2018 The painting is also an unusually easy-to-read example of Soutine’s distinctive perspectival wobble. Will Heinrich, New York Times, "Steeped in Blood, Soutine’s Work Revels in Life, Not Death," 11 May 2018 But stocks shook off an early wobble on Wall Street as solid earnings from Walmart encouraged investors to bid up other retailers and consumer goods companies. Elaine Kurtenbach, The Seattle Times, "Asian shares mostly higher, extending Wall St advance," 19 Feb. 2019 The seismic waves from these wobbles will help planetary scientists decode the structure of Mars’ interior, similar to how ultrasounds show us what’s inside a person’s body. Loren Grush, The Verge, "Hanging out at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory," 27 Nov. 2018 While wood blocks crack, heads nod and wobble like the tops of bobblehead dolls. Brian Seibert, New York Times, "Review: With ‘Dougla,’ Dance Theater of Harlem Recalls Past Glory," 8 Apr. 2018 That’s when the yuan experienced a nasty wobble, declining 4% in two days as capital flows reversed. John Greenwood, WSJ, "How China Copes With Capital Flight," 19 Nov. 2018 Yet another experiment will calculate Mars’ wobble, providing clues about the planet’s core. Marcia Dunn, The Seattle Times, "Mars revisited: NASA spacecraft days away from risky landing," 21 Nov. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'wobble.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of wobble

Verb

1657, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1a

Noun

1699, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for wobble

Verb

probably from Low German wabbeln; akin to Old English wǣfre restless — more at waver

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Dictionary Entries near wobble

WOB

wob

wobbegong

wobble

wobble plate

wobble pump

wobble saw

Statistics for wobble

Last Updated

10 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for wobble

The first known use of wobble was in 1657

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More Definitions for wobble

wobble

verb

English Language Learners Definition of wobble

: to move with an unsteady side-to-side motion
: to be or become unsteady or unsure

wobble

verb
wob·​ble | \ ˈwä-bəl\
wobbled; wobbling

Kids Definition of wobble

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to move from side to side in a shaky manner The Black Knight … wobbled, and then fell to the ground …— Jon Scieszka, Knights of the Kitchen Table

Other Words from wobble

wobbly \ ˈwä-​blē \ adjective

wobble

noun

Kids Definition of wobble (Entry 2 of 2)

: a rocking motion from side to side

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More from Merriam-Webster on wobble

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with wobble

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for wobble

Spanish Central: Translation of wobble

Nglish: Translation of wobble for Spanish Speakers

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