tremble

verb
trem·​ble | \ ˈtrem-bəl How to pronounce tremble (audio) \
trembled; trembling\ ˈtrem-​b(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce trembling (audio) \

Definition of tremble

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to shake involuntarily (as with fear or cold) : shiver
2 : to move, sound, pass, or come to pass as if shaken or tremulous the building trembled from the blast
3 : to be affected with great fear or anxiety trembled for the safety of her child

tremble

noun

Definition of tremble (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an act or instance of trembling especially : a fit or spell of involuntary shaking or quivering
2 trembles plural in form but singular in construction : severe poisoning of livestock and especially cattle by a toxic alcohol present in a snakeroot (Eupatorium rugosum) and rayless goldenrod that is characterized especially by muscular tremors, weakness, and constipation

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Other Words from tremble

Verb

trembler \ ˈtrem-​b(ə-​)lər How to pronounce trembler (audio) \ noun

Synonyms for tremble

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of tremble in a Sentence

Verb His arms and legs began to tremble. My voice trembled as I began to speak. I opened the letter with trembling hands. The house trembled as the big truck drove by. Noun with a tremble, she ventured out into the snow
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb When Mother visits the Man in Black, Janney's trembling delivery suggests fear, and sorrow. Darren Franich, EW.com, "Ten years later, Lost's most tantalizing mysteries are still 'Across the Sea'," 11 May 2020 The findings in our own solar system have shown that the cosmos is trembling with the rumble of churning worlds. Marina Koren, The Atlantic, "A Solar System of Fire and Ice," 12 Mar. 2020 The baby is being held by an older woman who takes one look at Villanelle and starts trembling and babbling in terror, begging her not to kill the baby, or her, but especially not the baby. Kat Rosenfield, EW.com, "Killing Eve recap: Just throw it away, throw the whole entire baby away," 27 Apr. 2020 Sixty-six million years ago, the ground of western North America trembled with the footfalls of a tyrant: Tyrannosaurus rex. National Geographic, "These sleek predatory dinosaurs really are teenage T. rex," 1 Jan. 2020 Hands trembling, Ashanty tried to untie the rope but couldn't. Anchorage Daily News, "Trump’s rhetoric has changed the way kids are bullied in classrooms," 14 Feb. 2020 Hands trembling, Ashanty tried to untie the rope but couldn’t. Washington Post, "The president’s rhetoric has changed the way hundreds of children are harassed in American classrooms, The Post found," 13 Feb. 2020 Chevy stands stock-still, ears perked, trembling slightly. Popular Science, "Did humans truly domesticate dogs? Canine history is more of a mystery than you think.," 10 Feb. 2020 In a year when the auto industry’s very foundations occasionally seemed to tremble, some fundamental truths remain. Mark Phelan, Freep.com, "Corvette, Ranger and Telluride triumph as Free Press car, truck and SUV of the year," 29 Dec. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun There’s something though, in this ceremony, that usually stays buried: the struggle of the parturient that accompanies the tremble of creation; the mother’s womb where poetry blooms, from shape to shape. Eliza Huber, refinery29.com, "Gucci’s Version Of A Quarantine Is Extremely Chic," 19 May 2020 Thus there may not be a simple way to decipher whether an early warning sign is an omen of a major, more destructive quake or a tiny tremble. Everyday Einstein Sabrina Stierwalt, Scientific American, "Can We Predict Earthquakes At All?," 15 Jan. 2020 Analyses are getting better, and data are accruing on seismometers around the world that are constantly listening for our planet’s every tremble. Maya Wei-haas, National Geographic, "Earth's inner core is doing something weird," 19 Aug. 2019 Alexis Taylor croons in a high, understanding tremble, and Joe Goddard offers plummy, sad ballast. Spencer Kornhaber, The Atlantic, "Hot Chip Hones the Meaning of ‘Ecstasy’," 25 June 2019 The faint signal, which came on April 6, is the first tremble that scientists believe comes from the Martian interior, rather than from surface forces, such as wind. National Geographic, "First 'marsquake' detected by NASA lander," 23 Apr. 2019 Instead, its trembles are thought to come from the slow cooling of the planet over time, which causes the orb to contract and develop fractures on its surface. National Geographic, "First 'marsquake' detected by NASA lander," 23 Apr. 2019 Feel a tremble in your stomach, in your chest, in your fingertips. Shelly Oria, Longreads, "How to Be Single," 2 July 2018 The 28-year-old record for NCAA tournament 3-point shots, the 21 by Loyola Marymount in 1990 against Michigan, began a rare tremble. Chuck Culpepper, chicagotribune.com, "An efficiency of movement: Villanova's offense takes over," 1 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'tremble.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of tremble

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1609, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for tremble

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French trembler, from Medieval Latin tremulare, from Latin tremulus tremulous, from tremere to tremble; akin to Greek tremein to tremble

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Time Traveler for tremble

Time Traveler

The first known use of tremble was in the 14th century

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Statistics for tremble

Last Updated

27 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Tremble.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tremble. Accessed 1 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for tremble

tremble

verb
How to pronounce tremble (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of tremble

: to shake slightly because you are afraid, nervous, excited, etc.
: to shake slightly because of some force
somewhat formal : to be afraid or nervous

tremble

verb
trem·​ble | \ ˈtrem-bəl How to pronounce tremble (audio) \
trembled; trembling

Kids Definition of tremble

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to shake without control (as from fear or cold) : shiver
2 : to move, sound, or happen as if shaken My voice trembled. Just at this moment Stuart … felt the whole ship tremble … with the force of the collision.— E. B. White, Stuart Little
3 : to have strong fear or doubt I tremble to think of what might happen.

tremble

noun

Kids Definition of tremble (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act or a period of shaking

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More from Merriam-Webster on tremble

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for tremble

Spanish Central: Translation of tremble

Nglish: Translation of tremble for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of tremble for Arabic Speakers

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