tremble

verb
trem·​ble | \ ˈtrem-bəl How to pronounce tremble (audio) \
trembled; trembling\ ˈtrem-​b(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce trembling (audio) \

Definition of tremble

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to shake involuntarily (as with fear or cold) : shiver
2 : to move, sound, pass, or come to pass as if shaken or tremulous the building trembled from the blast
3 : to be affected with great fear or anxiety trembled for the safety of her child

tremble

noun

Definition of tremble (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an act or instance of trembling especially : a fit or spell of involuntary shaking or quivering
2 trembles plural in form but singular in construction : severe poisoning of livestock and especially cattle by a toxic alcohol present in a snakeroot (Eupatorium rugosum) and rayless goldenrod that is characterized especially by muscular tremors, weakness, and constipation

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Other Words from tremble

Verb

trembler \ ˈtrem-​b(ə-​)lər How to pronounce trembler (audio) \ noun

Synonyms for tremble

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of tremble in a Sentence

Verb His arms and legs began to tremble. My voice trembled as I began to speak. I opened the letter with trembling hands. The house trembled as the big truck drove by. Noun with a tremble, she ventured out into the snow
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The five-rings champion basketball player was 41 WHENEVER HE WAS asked why his whole life had been spent playing basketball, Kobe Bryant’s narrow eyes searched upwards, and his mouth trembled. The Economist, "Love story Kobe Bryant died on January 26th," 1 Feb. 2020 Our first sight is a naked Pius receiving a sponge bath from a trembling young nun. Mike Hale, New York Times, "Review: ‘The New Pope’ on HBO: Faith, Hope and Sponge Baths," 12 Jan. 2020 His habit of glancing downward, carefully, his eyes slightly hooded under thick brows, which could set his interlocutors trembling. The Economist, "Nowhere and everywhere Obituary: Qassem Suleimani was assassinated on January 3rd," 9 Jan. 2020 The British rapper Kojey Radical, in particular, drew the crowd into a frenzy, leading singalongs and moshing across the trembling National Sawdust floor. Andrew R. Chow, Time, "Meet COLORS, a Rising Powerhouse for Music Discovery," 27 Nov. 2019 McKellen’s trembling, fragile Gus the Theater Cat is clearly too far across the rainbow bridge already. Leah Greenblatt, EW.com, "Cats is exactly as crazy as you thought it would be: Review," 19 Dec. 2019 That is fighting talk in a country that long trembled under the lash of Islam Karimov, who, after serving the Kremlin loyally for many years, tyrannised the independent country until his death in 2016. The Economist, "Uzbekistan holds a semi-serious election," 18 Dec. 2019 Or Riccardo Muti and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra make the house tremble in Verdi’s Requiem? Howard Reich, chicagotribune.com, "Commentary: Can jazz and classical music soothe our troubled times? Yes — if we really listen.," 11 Dec. 2019 Symptoms include nausea, trembling, a rapid heart rate, and intense sweating. Jasmine Grant, Essence, "Summer Walker Addresses Critics Who Don't Believe She Has Social Anxiety," 27 Nov. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Thus there may not be a simple way to decipher whether an early warning sign is an omen of a major, more destructive quake or a tiny tremble. Everyday Einstein Sabrina Stierwalt, Scientific American, "Can We Predict Earthquakes At All?," 15 Jan. 2020 Analyses are getting better, and data are accruing on seismometers around the world that are constantly listening for our planet’s every tremble. Maya Wei-haas, National Geographic, "Earth's inner core is doing something weird," 19 Aug. 2019 Alexis Taylor croons in a high, understanding tremble, and Joe Goddard offers plummy, sad ballast. Spencer Kornhaber, The Atlantic, "Hot Chip Hones the Meaning of ‘Ecstasy’," 25 June 2019 The faint signal, which came on April 6, is the first tremble that scientists believe comes from the Martian interior, rather than from surface forces, such as wind. National Geographic, "First 'marsquake' detected by NASA lander," 23 Apr. 2019 Instead, its trembles are thought to come from the slow cooling of the planet over time, which causes the orb to contract and develop fractures on its surface. National Geographic, "First 'marsquake' detected by NASA lander," 23 Apr. 2019 Feel a tremble in your stomach, in your chest, in your fingertips. Shelly Oria, Longreads, "How to Be Single," 2 July 2018 The 28-year-old record for NCAA tournament 3-point shots, the 21 by Loyola Marymount in 1990 against Michigan, began a rare tremble. Chuck Culpepper, chicagotribune.com, "An efficiency of movement: Villanova's offense takes over," 1 Apr. 2018 The researchers have installed a complex network of sensors that monitor Mayon’s every tremble and burp and are using their vast amounts of knowledge garnered from past events to interpret the volcano’s every shiver. Maya Wei-haas, Smithsonian, "Geology Makes the Mayon Volcano Visually Spectacular—And Dangerously Explosive," 19 Jan. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'tremble.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of tremble

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1609, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for tremble

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French trembler, from Medieval Latin tremulare, from Latin tremulus tremulous, from tremere to tremble; akin to Greek tremein to tremble

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Time Traveler for tremble

Time Traveler

The first known use of tremble was in the 14th century

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Statistics for tremble

Last Updated

19 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Tremble.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/trembling. Accessed 24 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for tremble

tremble

verb
How to pronounce tremble (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of tremble

: to shake slightly because you are afraid, nervous, excited, etc.
: to shake slightly because of some force
somewhat formal : to be afraid or nervous

tremble

verb
trem·​ble | \ ˈtrem-bəl How to pronounce tremble (audio) \
trembled; trembling

Kids Definition of tremble

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to shake without control (as from fear or cold) : shiver
2 : to move, sound, or happen as if shaken My voice trembled. Just at this moment Stuart … felt the whole ship tremble … with the force of the collision.— E. B. White, Stuart Little
3 : to have strong fear or doubt I tremble to think of what might happen.

tremble

noun

Kids Definition of tremble (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act or a period of shaking

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More from Merriam-Webster on tremble

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for tremble

Spanish Central: Translation of tremble

Nglish: Translation of tremble for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of tremble for Arabic Speakers

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