shudder

verb
shud·​der | \ ˈshə-dər How to pronounce shudder (audio) \
shuddered; shuddering\ ˈshə-​d(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce shudder (audio) \

Definition of shudder

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to tremble convulsively : shiver, quiver

shudder

noun

Definition of shudder (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act of shuddering

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Other Words from shudder

Noun

shuddery \ ˈshə-​d(ə-​)rē How to pronounce shudder (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for shudder

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of shudder in a Sentence

Verb The old car shuddered to a halt. The house shuddered as a plane flew overhead. Noun a shudder ran through him as he stepped outside into the snow
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb While most organizations might shudder at the thought of customizing a streaming solution per individual smart TV type, one of the fastest methods to support the unique specs of smart TVs is by implementing a multi-codec solution. Stefan Lederer, Forbes, 22 June 2021 Here Cynthia would shudder dramatically, wrap her bony fingers around her shoulders in a girlish manner that, a long time ago, might have been charming. Rachel Heng, The New Yorker, 31 May 2021 Tubis, who immigrated to Israel from Russia at age 12, makes work that seems to shudder with isolation, a feeling that resonates with Akiva’s experience. New York Times, 20 Apr. 2021 My favorite part of the evening would probably make liability lawyers shudder today: When the racing was over, fans were welcome to come down to infield, where all the race cars were parked. Julia Wick, Los Angeles Times, 9 Mar. 2021 Many business owners shudder at the thought of cold pitching. Expert Panel®, Forbes, 25 Feb. 2021 King would shudder in dismay at the weaponization of identity politics. Kendall Qualls, Star Tribune, 17 Jan. 2021 Legal scholars and some pardon lawyers shudder at the prospect of such moves, as well as the specter of Trump's friends and allies offering to pursue pardons for others in exchange for cash. Star Tribune, 17 Jan. 2021 Legal scholars and some pardon lawyers shudder at the prospect of such moves, as well as the specter of Trump’s friends and allies offering to pursue pardons for others in exchange for cash. Michael S. Schmidt, BostonGlobe.com, 17 Jan. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun About 15 years ago, seismometers in the Cascadia region began to pick out a small shudder—as subtle as the rumble of a passing train—lasting for several weeks. Paul Voosen, Science | AAAS, 30 June 2021 These questions are enough to make journalists and PR folk shudder. April Margulies, Forbes, 4 June 2021 The deposited pups immediately open their mouths and shudder with the force of their inaudible-to-human-ears distress cries. Dina Litovsky, Smithsonian Magazine, 22 Apr. 2021 Amy Stelly is reminded of that freeway each morning when the truck traffic causes her home to shudder. New York Times, 1 Apr. 2021 Whenever new storms strike Japan’s Pacific coastline, some people in Fukushima Prefecture shudder from memories of the 10-year-old trauma. New York Times, 9 Mar. 2021 To see the roofless nave backlit against low clouds provokes an involuntary shudder. Joshua Levine, Travel + Leisure, 7 Mar. 2021 Even so, Ventura, 37, could conceivably place second among the seven candidates, drawing a level of support that until recently was unthinkable and sending a shudder through Portuguese politics. Barry Hatton, Star Tribune, 22 Jan. 2021 The mere sight of tourists wearing the leather-and-cork sandals with socks used to make fashionistas shudder on the avenues of Paris. Nick Kostov, WSJ, 26 Feb. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'shudder.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of shudder

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1607, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for shudder

Verb

Middle English shoddren; akin to Old High German skutten to shake and perhaps to Lithuanian kutėti to shake up

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Time Traveler for shudder

Time Traveler

The first known use of shudder was in the 13th century

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Dictionary Entries Near shudder

shucky bean

shudder

shudderingly

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Statistics for shudder

Last Updated

6 Jul 2021

Cite this Entry

“Shudder.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/shudder. Accessed 30 Jul. 2021.

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More Definitions for shudder

shudder

verb

English Language Learners Definition of shudder

of a person : to shake because of fear, cold, etc.
of a thing : to shake violently

shudder

verb
shud·​der | \ ˈshə-dər How to pronounce shudder (audio) \
shuddered; shuddering

Kids Definition of shudder

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to tremble especially with fear or horror or from cold
2 : to move or sound as if being shaken The train slowed and shuddered to a halt.

shudder

noun

Kids Definition of shudder (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act or instance of trembling or shaking a shudder of fear

shudder

intransitive verb
shud·​der | \ ˈshəd-ər How to pronounce shudder (audio) \
shuddered; shuddering

Medical Definition of shudder

: to tremble convulsively : shiver

Other Words from shudder

shudder noun

More from Merriam-Webster on shudder

Nglish: Translation of shudder for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of shudder for Arabic Speakers

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