volatile

adjective
vol·​a·​tile | \ ˈvä-lə-tᵊl, especially British -ˌtī(-ə)l\

Definition of volatile

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : characterized by or subject to rapid or unexpected change a volatile market
b : unable to hold the attention fixed because of an inherent lightness or fickleness of disposition
2a : tending to erupt into violence : explosive a volatile temper
b : easily aroused volatile suspicions
3 : readily vaporizable at a relatively low temperature
4 : difficult to capture or hold permanently : evanescent, transitory
5 : flying or having the power to fly

volatile

noun
vol·​a·​tile | \ ˈvä-lə-tᵊl, especially British -ˌtī(-ə)l\

Definition of volatile (Entry 2 of 2)

: a substance that is readily vaporizable at relatively low temperature : a volatile substance

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Other Words from volatile

Adjective

volatileness noun
volatility \ ˌvä-​lə-​ˈti-​lə-​tē \ noun

The History of Volatile Is for the Birds

Adjective

Volatile was originally for the birds - quite literally. Back in the 14th century, volatile was a noun that referred to birds (especially wild fowl) or other winged creatures, such as butterflies. That's not as flighty as it sounds. Volatile traces back to the Latin verb volare, which means "to fly." By the end of the 16th century, people were using volatile as an adjective for things that were so light they seemed ready to fly. The adjective was soon extended to vapors and gases, and by the early 17th century, volatile was being applied to individuals or things as prone to sudden change as some gaseous substances. In recent years, volatile has landed in economic, political, and technical contexts far flown from its avian origins.

Examples of volatile in a Sentence

Adjective

I am beginning to hear investors say that the best way to beat this volatile market is by trading—anxiously moving in and out of securities as the market ebbs and flows. In my view there is no surer path to the poorhouse. — John W. Rogers, Jr., Forbes, 25 May 2009 Usually, only a few of the volatile chemicals in a fragrance are obviously noticeable to human noses. — Ivan Amato, Science News, 24 Sept. 2005 VOCs (or volatile organic compounds) are thought to be among the potential culprits behind illnesses often lumped under the heading of Sick Building Syndrome. — Scott Schilling, This Old House, March 2005 … it was Elvis who represented rock and roll at its unblushing, volatile best; he was its first master and the embodiment of every reason that adolescents of the postwar years turned to it in favor of the cheerfully torpid pop music … to which their parents were listening. — David Hajdu, New York Review of Books, 9 Oct. 2003 When left unused, make-up has a tendency to dry out because any water or other volatile substances it contains evaporate. — Barry Fox, New Scientist, 9 Aug. 2003 The stock market can be very volatile. She is a volatile woman. The protests are increasing, creating a volatile situation in the capital.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

By providing refuge to some 750,000 Rohingya Muslims driven out of Myanmar, Bangladesh has carved out an international profile as a responsible and compassionate Muslim-majority nation that helps stabilize a volatile region. Sadanand Dhume, WSJ, "Bangladesh’s Bad Election Choice," 28 Dec. 2018 Blomquist noted that data in some of the smaller markets can be volatile from month to month. Jeff Andrews, Curbed, "Home prices have finally hit a wall on the West Coast," 16 Oct. 2018 Five days after the blast, another deadly bombing hit Isulan, prompting authorities to remove the town and provincial police chiefs and further strengthen already tight security in the volatile region. Fox News, "43 suspects in deadly Philippine bombings face criminal raps," 10 Sep. 2018 But chemicals used to make meth are volatile and toxic, leading to explosions for those without chemistry knowledge, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. Alexis Stevens, The Seattle Times, "Georgia tallies meth’s toll: Nearly 20 percent of those killed by police in state test positive for it," 20 Nov. 2018 Indeed, there is no guarantee that any of the companies planning to debut next year or in 2020 will manage to do so, as the IPO market is notoriously volatile and sensitive to market and economic health. Corrie Driebusch, WSJ, "Tech Startups Stoke Market For IPOs," 18 Oct. 2018 Income and spending needs are volatile and don't always match up. Fox News, "A lifeline for workers who face hardship between paychecks," 6 Aug. 2018 One was taciturn and steady; the other was volatile and virtuosic. New York Times, "What’s on TV Thursday: ‘Secret City’ and ‘Blue Valentine’," 5 July 2018 Fissure 22 is the most volatile and dynamic fissure on the Big Island, by far. Mark Strassmann, CBS News, "Crews struggle to protect Hawaii power plant from red-hot lava flow," 22 May 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Theory predicts that such impacts would have generated immense amounts of heat, which in turn would have driven volatiles out of the rocks that evenutally formed the moon. Mike Wall, Space.com, "First Atomic Blast Reveals Clues About Moon Formation," 8 Feb. 2017 A year later, The Following expansion made good on some of Dying Light’s promise, with a much more interesting conceit (sentient volatiles!) and more personality for protagonist Kyle Crane. Hayden Dingman, PCWorld, "Dying Light 2 builds more heart and brains into one of the best zombie games ever," 15 June 2018 Tholins are a sort of aerosol thrown out when volatiles escape an atmosphere, but Pluto appears to not lose many of its volatile particles to space. John Wenz, Popular Mechanics, "Here's What We Know About Pluto So Far," 17 July 2015 The organic molecules and volatiles, comparable to samples of sedimentary rock rich in organics on Earth, included thiopene, methylthiophenes methanethiol and dimethylsulfide. Ashley Strickland, CNN, "NASA's Curiosity rover finds organic matter on Mars," 7 June 2018 My developed method utilizes fungus and volatiles to deter the growth of purple nutsedge without risk to non-target plants and to the benefit of the agricultural community. Hanna Howard, Teen Vogue, "Meet 7 Regeneron Science Talent Search Finalists," 9 Mar. 2018 Understanding lunar volatiles could improve the productivity and value of future human involvement with the moon, scientists have stressed. Leonard David, Scientific American, "Should We Open Some Sealed Moon Samples?," 5 Mar. 2018 The current best suggestion is the boiling off of volatiles. Chris Lee, Ars Technica, "LISA pathfinder mission a glorious success," 12 Feb. 2018 Caesar would scoop up at least 100 grams from the comet, separating the volatiles — constituents that could evaporate — from the more solid substances. Kenneth Chang, New York Times, "Finalists in NASA’s Spacecraft Sweepstakes: A Drone on Titan, and a Comet-Chaser," 19 Dec. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'volatile.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of volatile

Adjective

1605, in the meaning defined at sense 3

Noun

1686, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for volatile

Adjective and Noun

French, from Latin volatilis, from volare to fly

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Statistics for volatile

Last Updated

9 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for volatile

The first known use of volatile was in 1605

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More Definitions for volatile

volatile

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of volatile

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: likely to change in a very sudden or extreme way

: having or showing extreme or sudden changes of emotion

: likely to become dangerous or out of control

volatile

noun

English Language Learners Definition of volatile (Entry 2 of 2)

: a chemical or compound that changes into a gas easily

volatile

adjective
vol·​a·​tile | \ ˈvä-lə-tᵊl \

Kids Definition of volatile

1 : easily becoming a gas at a fairly low temperature volatile solvents
2 : likely to change suddenly a volatile temper

volatile

noun
vol·​a·​tile | \ ˈväl-ət-ᵊl, esp British -ə-ˌtīl\

Medical Definition of volatile

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a volatile substance

volatile

adjective

Medical Definition of volatile (Entry 2 of 2)

: readily vaporizable at a relatively low temperature

Other Words from volatile

volatility \ ˌväl-​ə-​ˈtil-​ət-​ē \ noun, plural volatilities

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More from Merriam-Webster on volatile

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for volatile

Spanish Central: Translation of volatile

Nglish: Translation of volatile for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of volatile for Arabic Speakers

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