venerate

verb
ven·​er·​ate | \ ˈve-nə-ˌrāt How to pronounce venerate (audio) \
venerated; venerating

Definition of venerate

transitive verb

1 : to regard with reverential respect or with admiring deference
2 : to honor (an icon, a relic, etc.) with a ritual act of devotion

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Other Words from venerate

venerator \ ˈve-​nə-​ˌrā-​tər How to pronounce venerator (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for venerate

revere, reverence, venerate, worship, adore mean to honor and admire profoundly and respectfully. revere stresses deference and tenderness of feeling. a professor revered by her students reverence presupposes an intrinsic merit and inviolability in the one honored and a similar depth of feeling in the one honoring. reverenced the academy's code of honor venerate implies a holding as holy or sacrosanct because of character, association, or age. heroes still venerated worship implies homage usually expressed in words or ceremony. worships their memory adore implies love and stresses the notion of an individual and personal attachment. we adored our doctor

What's the Difference Between venerate, revere, and reverence?

Venerate, revere, reverence, worship, and adore all mean to honor and admire profoundly and respectfully. Venerate implies a holding as holy or sacrosanct because of character, association, or age. Revere stresses deference and tenderness of feeling ("a professor revered by students"). Reverence presupposes an intrinsic merit and inviolability in the one honored and a similar depth of feeling in the one honoring ("she reverenced the academy's code of honor"). Worship implies homage usually expressed in words or ceremony ("he worships their memory"). Adore implies love and stresses the notion of an individual and personal attachment ("we adored our doctor"). Venerate, incidentally, traces back to the Latin verb venerari, from vener-, meaning "love" or "charm."

Examples of venerate in a Sentence

a writer venerated by generations of admirers She is venerated as a saint.
Recent Examples on the Web The notion of the flywheel—the heavy disk within a machine that, once spinning, pushes gears and production relentlessly forward—is venerated within Amazon, as Ian Freed learned on his first day of work, in 2004. Charles Duhigg, The New Yorker, "Is Amazon Unstoppable?," 10 Oct. 2019 Iran’s renowned heritage sites include religious centers venerated by Shii Muslims. Washington Post, "What Trump’s tweet threatening Iran’s cultural sites could mean for Shiite Muslims," 9 Jan. 2020 The story ends years into a future wherein McManus’s fictional leader is, despite his personal flaws, venerated as the hero–founder of a pure and enduring whites-only ethno-utopia. Ian Allen, The New Republic, "The Far Right’s Apocalyptic Literary Canon," 1 Oct. 2019 The townspeople, finding this situation scandalous and titillating, venerate him for his perfect management of the station, but abhor her because, well, someone must be abhorred. Jesse Green, New York Times, "Review: ‘Judgment Day,’ an Allegory of Blame, Goes Big," 11 Dec. 2019 Lucia was a young Christian martyr of the early 4th century who is venerated as a saint by the Roman Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran and Orthodox churches. Joy Wallace Dickinson, orlandosentinel.com, "St. Lucia Festival returns to honor Central Florida’s Swedish heritage," 1 Dec. 2019 In a contemporary culture that tends to venerate Holocaust survivors, the idea that a victim might have behaved in a questionable manner seems inconceivable. Dan Porat, Time, "How Israel’s Justice System Dealt With Alleged Jewish Collaborators in Concentration Camps—And Why That Still Matters Today," 25 Oct. 2019 At the time, Ghonim was venerated by different pro-democracy groups as a revolutionary figure. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Activist: Egyptian authorities arrest brother to silence me," 20 Sep. 2019 They are not venerated immortals in our cultural memory, but relegated to history books as warnings, reminding us not to repeat the past. Dp Opinion, The Denver Post, "Letters: There is no gray area in Stapleton name debate (8/30/19)," 1 Sep. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'venerate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of venerate

circa 1623, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for venerate

borrowed from Latin venerātus, past participle of Latin venerārī "to solicit the good will of (a deity), worship, pay homage to, hold in awe," verbal derivative of vener-, venus "sexual desire, qualities exciting desire, charm, (as proper noun) goddess personifying sexual attractiveness" (probably originally in cognate accusative phrase Venerem venerārī "to propitiate Venus," extended to other deities) — more at venus

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Time Traveler for venerate

Time Traveler

The first known use of venerate was circa 1623

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Last Updated

29 Jan 2020

Cite this Entry

“Venerate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/venerate. Accessed 27 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for venerate

venerate

verb
How to pronounce venerate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of venerate

formal : to feel or show deep respect for (someone or something that is considered great, holy, etc.)

venerate

verb
ven·​er·​ate | \ ˈve-nə-ˌrāt How to pronounce venerate (audio) \
venerated; venerating

Kids Definition of venerate

1 : to consider holy
2 : to show deep respect for

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Comments on venerate

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