venerate

verb
ven·​er·​ate | \ ˈve-nə-ˌrāt How to pronounce venerate (audio) \
venerated; venerating

Definition of venerate

transitive verb

1 : to regard with reverential respect or with admiring deference
2 : to honor (an icon, a relic, etc.) with a ritual act of devotion

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Other Words from venerate

venerator \ ˈve-​nə-​ˌrā-​tər How to pronounce venerator (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for venerate

revere, reverence, venerate, worship, adore mean to honor and admire profoundly and respectfully. revere stresses deference and tenderness of feeling. a professor revered by her students reverence presupposes an intrinsic merit and inviolability in the one honored and a similar depth of feeling in the one honoring. reverenced the academy's code of honor venerate implies a holding as holy or sacrosanct because of character, association, or age. heroes still venerated worship implies homage usually expressed in words or ceremony. worships their memory adore implies love and stresses the notion of an individual and personal attachment. we adored our doctor

What's the Difference Between venerate, revere, and reverence?

Venerate, revere, reverence, worship, and adore all mean to honor and admire profoundly and respectfully. Venerate implies a holding as holy or sacrosanct because of character, association, or age. Revere stresses deference and tenderness of feeling ("a professor revered by students"). Reverence presupposes an intrinsic merit and inviolability in the one honored and a similar depth of feeling in the one honoring ("she reverenced the academy's code of honor"). Worship implies homage usually expressed in words or ceremony ("he worships their memory"). Adore implies love and stresses the notion of an individual and personal attachment ("we adored our doctor"). Venerate, incidentally, traces back to the Latin verb venerari, from vener-, meaning "love" or "charm."

Examples of venerate in a Sentence

a writer venerated by generations of admirers She is venerated as a saint.
Recent Examples on the Web Lee’s tomb, a place of pilgrimage for some who venerate that cause, is on the campus. BostonGlobe.com, "Richmond removes second Confederate statue as crowd cheers," 2 July 2020 It’s in the striking Georgian facades of Edinburgh and Glasgow, paid for by plantation profits, and on the monuments and street names that venerate men who were enriched by human suffering. NBC News, "Calls grow for Scotland to reckon with its slave-owning past," 13 June 2020 The model is good for pro-business conservatives who venerate small business and entrepreneurship and an easy sell for liberals interested in decreasing wealth and income inequality. Vanessa A. Bee, The New Republic, "A Quiet Workplace Revolution in the Shadow of Silicon Valley," 3 June 2020 Mike Wallace, the City University historian, recalled that there had been concerns among some historians that the Hamilton exhibition venerated conservative monetary policies. Sam Roberts, BostonGlobe.com, "Richard Gilder, donor to parks, museum and history," 18 May 2020 That includes the Vatican, where Pope Francis will venerate the Cross alone in St. Peter's Basilica, according to Rome Reports. Editors, USA TODAY, "Good Friday, coronavirus pandemic, severe storms in the Northeast: 5 things to know Friday," 10 Apr. 2020 Alas, a culture that venerates aviators is resistant to change. The Economist, "Aircraft-carriers are big, expensive, vulnerable—and popular," 14 Nov. 2019 There is doubt about that among the Muslims of Kandy, a city dotted with lakes and surrounded by dense mountain jungles that is home to Buddhism’s venerated Temple of the Sacred Tooth. Washington Post, "Buddhist nationalists claim victory in Sri Lankan election," 27 Nov. 2019 The notion of the flywheel—the heavy disk within a machine that, once spinning, pushes gears and production relentlessly forward—is venerated within Amazon, as Ian Freed learned on his first day of work, in 2004. Charles Duhigg, The New Yorker, "Is Amazon Unstoppable?," 10 Oct. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'venerate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of venerate

circa 1623, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for venerate

borrowed from Latin venerātus, past participle of Latin venerārī "to solicit the good will of (a deity), worship, pay homage to, hold in awe," verbal derivative of vener-, venus "sexual desire, qualities exciting desire, charm, (as proper noun) goddess personifying sexual attractiveness" (probably originally in cognate accusative phrase Venerem venerārī "to propitiate Venus," extended to other deities) — more at venus

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Time Traveler for venerate

Time Traveler

The first known use of venerate was circa 1623

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Last Updated

13 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Venerate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/venerate. Accessed 15 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for venerate

venerate

verb
How to pronounce venerate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of venerate

formal : to feel or show deep respect for (someone or something that is considered great, holy, etc.)

venerate

verb
ven·​er·​ate | \ ˈve-nə-ˌrāt How to pronounce venerate (audio) \
venerated; venerating

Kids Definition of venerate

1 : to consider holy
2 : to show deep respect for

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Comments on venerate

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