venerate

verb
ven·​er·​ate | \ˈve-nə-ˌrāt \
venerated; venerating

Definition of venerate 

transitive verb

1 : to regard with reverential respect or with admiring deference

2 : to honor (an icon, a relic, etc.) with a ritual act of devotion

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Other Words from venerate

venerator \ ˈve-​nə-​ˌrā-​tər \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for venerate

revere, reverence, venerate, worship, adore mean to honor and admire profoundly and respectfully. revere stresses deference and tenderness of feeling. a professor revered by her students reverence presupposes an intrinsic merit and inviolability in the one honored and a similar depth of feeling in the one honoring. reverenced the academy's code of honor venerate implies a holding as holy or sacrosanct because of character, association, or age. heroes still venerated worship implies homage usually expressed in words or ceremony. worships their memory adore implies love and stresses the notion of an individual and personal attachment. we adored our doctor

What's the Difference Between venerate, revere, and reverence?

Venerate, revere, reverence, worship, and adore all mean to honor and admire profoundly and respectfully. Venerate implies a holding as holy or sacrosanct because of character, association, or age. Revere stresses deference and tenderness of feeling ("a professor revered by students"). Reverence presupposes an intrinsic merit and inviolability in the one honored and a similar depth of feeling in the one honoring ("she reverenced the academy's code of honor"). Worship implies homage usually expressed in words or ceremony ("he worships their memory"). Adore implies love and stresses the notion of an individual and personal attachment ("we adored our doctor"). Venerate, incidentally, traces back to the Latin verb venerari, from vener-, meaning "love" or "charm."

Examples of venerate in a Sentence

a writer venerated by generations of admirers She is venerated as a saint.

Recent Examples on the Web

The Steyers’ home sits on a bluff overlooking the narrows known as the Golden Gate, the traditional point of entry to San Francisco, a gilded city named for a saint who venerated poverty. Rob Haskell, Vogue, "Billionaire Democrat Tom Steyer on Impeaching Trump, Getting Out the Vote, and Winning in 2020," 14 Nov. 2018 One of the key thinkers venerated by Putin and his circle is a hitherto obscure Russian fascist, Ivan Ilyin, whose views are absurd but terrifying in their implications. Margaret Macmillan, New York Times, "Are We Traveling the ‘Road to Unfreedom’?," 9 May 2018 Madikizela-Mandela was persecuted by the apartheid government, and venerated by many South Africans, because of her activism against white minority rule. Washington Post, "South Africa declares mourning period for Madikizela-Mandela," 3 Apr. 2018 Discretion is different now; it is practiced less, it is venerated less. Meagan Fredette, refinery29.com, "Are Justin Bieber & Ariana Grande Trying To One-Up Each Other On PDA?," 14 July 2018 Social media's problems stem not just from internet companies' business strategies but from the technologies the companies use and venerate. Nicholas Carr, chicagotribune.com, "Is Facebook the problem with Facebook, or is it us?," 10 July 2018 Every day, the whole world seems to venerate mothers, but for you, Mother’s Day is the worst. Yvonne Abraham, BostonGlobe.com, "For women who have trouble conceiving, Mother’s Day can be the worst," 12 May 2018 The comment made Lugo reflect on whose faces get venerated on vases. Cassie Owens, Philly.com, "Throwing down: How this potter from Kensington found fine art success," 26 June 2018 Mexico may venerate its teachers, but that seems not to have translated into learning. The Economist, "Mexico’s crucial education reform risks being unwound," 31 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'venerate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of venerate

circa 1623, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for venerate

borrowed from Latin venerātus, past participle of Latin venerārī "to solicit the good will of (a deity), worship, pay homage to, hold in awe," verbal derivative of vener-, venus "sexual desire, qualities exciting desire, charm, (as proper noun) goddess personifying sexual attractiveness" (probably originally in cognate accusative phrase Venerem venerārī "to propitiate Venus," extended to other deities) — more at venus

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Statistics for venerate

Last Updated

19 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for venerate

The first known use of venerate was circa 1623

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More Definitions for venerate

venerate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of venerate

: to feel or show deep respect for (someone or something that is considered great, holy, etc.)

venerate

verb
ven·​er·​ate | \ˈve-nə-ˌrāt \
venerated; venerating

Kids Definition of venerate

1 : to consider holy

2 : to show deep respect for

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Comments on venerate

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