vein

1 of 2

noun

1
: blood vessel
especially : any of the tubular branching vessels that carry blood from the capillaries toward the heart
2
a
: any of the vascular bundles forming the framework of a leaf
b
: any of the thickened cuticular ribs that serve to stiffen the wings of an insect
3
a
: a narrow water channel in rock or earth or in ice
b(1)
(2)
: a bed of useful mineral matter
4
: something suggesting veins (as in reticulation)
specifically : a wavy variegation (as in marble)
5
a
: a distinctive mode of expression : style
stories in a romantic vein
b
: a distinctive element or quality : strain
introduced a welcome vein of humor
c
: a line of thought or action
6
a
: a special aptitude
inherited an artistic vein
b
: a usually transitory and casually attained mood
c
: top form
thou troublest me; I am not in the veinWilliam Shakespeare
veinal adjective

vein

2 of 2

verb

veined; veining; veins

transitive verb

: to pattern with or as if with veins

Examples of vein in a Sentence

Noun the author goes on in that sarcastic vein for pages
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
In a similar vein, the WTO would be well-positioned to reframe the trade system’s approach to contested subsidies, such as the incentives for clean energy found in the U.S. Inflation Reduction Act. Dan Esty, Fortune, 26 Feb. 2024 If Swamy’s views are pure political theatre, other serious commentators have weighed in on a similar vein. Vasuki Shastry, Forbes, 19 Feb. 2024 Enriched by the agile, near-cartoonish drawings of Morris, Lucky Luke is a comedic Western in the vein of Destry Rides Again and El Dorado, with the occasional splash of Sergio Leone’s spaghetti mystique. Ernesto Lechner, The Hollywood Reporter, 17 Feb. 2024 After dropping out of college to pursue music full-time during the pandemic, the band toyed with an upbeat modern indie/pop sound in the vein of early COIN or The 1975. Tess Growney, SPIN, 15 Feb. 2024 Fentanyl users often inject it several times a day, and that can wear out their veins; smoking eliminates injection site challenges. Jen Christensen, CNN, 15 Feb. 2024 The issue roiled the country and exposed an ugly vein of bigotry in the American body politic. Harold Holzer, Smithsonian Magazine, 8 Feb. 2024 Some individuals also rely on red vein kratom to alleviate symptoms of chronic pain. Sponsored Content, The Mercury News, 16 Feb. 2024 In a similar vein, voting rights (which is high profile). Harrison Mantas, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 15 Feb. 2024
Verb
The ropey veins in James Hetfield’s throat threatened to burst through his skin, Kirk Hammett’s fingers were a blur on the guitar frets and no one can pull a stank face quite like Lars Ulrich while relentlessly shredding on the drums. Spin Staff, SPIN, 21 Dec. 2023 Available in both black and white, each stocking holder is a chic and modern block of Marquina marble with contrast veining variations, meaning each stocking holder will be unique. L. Daniela Alvarez, Better Homes & Gardens, 29 Nov. 2023 Mark veins on leaves with a pastry wheel or sharp knife. Eugenia W. Bell, Southern Living, 30 Oct. 2023 The up-to-date kitchen, all white with stainless-steel appliances and lightly veined white marble (or marble-like) counters, is open over a snack bar to a casual lounge for TV watching. Mark David, Robb Report, 7 Oct. 2023 Countertops are veined gray quartz, and backsplashes are vertical 3-by-6-inch gray tile. Benjamin C Tankersley, Washington Post, 13 Sep. 2023 The results suggested that as rain soaks into cracks in the ground, CO2 dissolved in the rainwater pairs up with magnesium atoms, forming magnesium carbonate veins, until the small amount of gas in the water quickly runs out. Douglas Fox, Scientific American, 1 July 2021 Companies are offering marble-look tile in unexpected hues like magenta and green, or with veining in gold or copper. Washington Post, 13 Nov. 2019 Coming up, says Tien: Parker House rolls veined with scallions and shallots, a riff on Chinese scallion pancakes. Tom Sietsema, Washington Post, 25 Oct. 2019 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'vein.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English veyne, borrowed from Anglo-French veine, going back to Latin vēna "blood vessel, channel," of obscure origin

Verb

verbal derivative of vein entry 1

First Known Use

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3a

Verb

1502, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of vein was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near vein

Cite this Entry

“Vein.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vein. Accessed 3 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

vein

noun
ˈvān
1
: a long narrow opening in rock filled with mineral matter
a vein of gold
2
a
: one of the blood vessels that carry blood from the capillaries back to the heart
b
: one of the vascular bundles forming the framework of a leaf
c
: one of the thickened ribs that stiffen the wings of an insect
3
: a wavy band or streak (as of a different color or texture)
a marble with greenish veins
4
: a style of expression
stories in a romantic vein

Medical Definition

vein

noun
: any of the tubular branching vessels that carry blood from the capillaries toward the heart and have thinner walls than the arteries and often valves at intervals to prevent reflux of the blood which flows in a steady stream and is in most cases dark-colored due to the presence of reduced hemoglobin

More from Merriam-Webster on vein

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