valuable

adjective
valu·​able | \ ˈval-yə-bəl How to pronounce valuable (audio) , -yə-wə-bəl, -yü-ə- How to pronounce valuable (audio) \

Definition of valuable

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : having monetary value
b : worth a good price
2a : having desirable or esteemed characteristics or qualities valuable friendships
b : of great use or service valuable advice

valuable

noun

Definition of valuable (Entry 2 of 2)

: a usually personal possession (such as jewelry) of relatively great monetary value usually used in plural

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Other Words from valuable

Adjective

valuableness noun
valuably \ ˈval-​yə-​blē How to pronounce valuably (audio) , -​yə-​wə-​blē , -​yü-​ə-​ \ adverb

Synonyms & Antonyms for valuable

Synonyms: Adjective

big-ticket, costly, dear, expensive, extravagant, high, high-end, high-ticket, precious, premium, priceless, pricey (also pricy), spendy [chiefly Northwest], ultraexpensive

Antonyms: Adjective

cheap, inexpensive

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invaluable = valuable?

Many people find it confusing that the in- prefix at the beginning of invaluable apparently lacks the meaning "not" found in a number of other words, such as invalid, inarticulate, and insane. In fact, the prefix does indicate negation, but in a way that is not immediately obvious. The original (and current) meaning of invaluable is "valuable beyond estimation"; the word describes something so precious that one cannot assign a price to it. This, clearly, is the opposite of the meaning "having no value; valueless" that the word might seem to carry. Invaluable actually has been recorded in the sense "without value," but such use has been exceedingly rare and is practically nonexistent today.

Examples of valuable in a Sentence

Adjective

The watch is extremely valuable. A lot of valuable advice can be found in this book. I learned a valuable lesson. He made many valuable contributions to the field of science. The volunteers provide a valuable service to the community. She is a valuable member of the staff. Clean air is a valuable natural resource that needs to be protected. Please don't waste my time. My time is very valuable.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

Their engagement brought awareness to a category that is less plentiful—and often more valuable—than white diamonds. Stellene Volandes, Town & Country, "Jennifer Lopez's Pink Diamond Made Her an Engagement Ring Influencer," 23 Mar. 2019 In 2019, Sephora has really been upping its effort to give shoppers a more valuable experience. Marci Robin, Allure, "Sephora Credit Cards (and Rewards) Are Coming — Here’s Everything We Know," 16 Mar. 2019 Pass-rushers are more valuable than ever in today’s NFL and Clark is Seattle’s only elite edge rusher, one of the top 10 or so in the league. Bob Condotta, The Seattle Times, "Seahawks mailbag: Is Seattle scouting the Alliance of American Football?," 12 Feb. 2019 Patches, as free and minor updates are called, became a valuable tool for smoothing out glitches that, in a previous era, would hamstring games for eternity. Eric Limer, Popular Mechanics, "Google's 'Stadia' Is the Latest Attack in the War on Games You Can Actually Own," 19 Mar. 2019 And every release makes it a more valuable tool not just as professional software, but for those looking to approach DJing from a beginner standpoint. Dani Deahl, The Verge, "Djay relaunched on iOS with subscription model and powerful performance features," 12 Dec. 2018 The results weren’t catastrophic; Facebook remains one of the most valuable companies in the world. Emily Stewart, Vox, "Facebook won’t fix itself," 15 Nov. 2018 Next: Han is working on figuring out how to turn prediction systems like her algorithms, which can be valuable tools for researchers already focused on sniffing out emerging diseases, into something more proactive, such as an early warning system. Mallory Locklear, Discover Magazine, "With Big Data and Predictive Analytics, Scientists Are Getting Smarter About Outbreaks," 8 Nov. 2018 To me, being a girl means being capable, strong, and valuable even in the face of a world that doesn’t seem to think so. Willa Bennett, Seventeen, "I Asked 500 Girls Around The World What Being Female Means To Them," 8 Mar. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Authorities tell you to go, get your important papers, get your pictures, get your valuables, and just go. Fox News, "George Papadopoulos on what he wants the American people to know," 12 Sep. 2018 While the Queen doesn't own the coveted Crown Jewels, the monarch does have a trove of valuables worth quite a pretty penny. Kayla Keegan, Good Housekeeping, "A Look at How Queen Elizabeth Has Amassed Such a Large Net Worth," 26 July 2018 Once the flow has ebbed, get undamaged valuables and heirlooms out of harm’s way. Joanne Cleaver, chicagotribune.com, "Reckoning with water damage, from flooded basements to faulty dishwashers," 20 Sep. 2017 The Siletz also lacks a security pocket for your passport or other small valuables. Thomas Ricker, The Verge, "‘The world’s most versatile waterproof backpack’ review," 20 Nov. 2018 Police also seized jewelry and hundreds of handbags and other valuables estimated at more than 1.1 billion ringgit ($273 million) from properties linked to Najib. Fox News, "Malaysia anti-graft agency arrests former leader Najib Razak," 19 Sep. 2018 Police also seized jewelry and valuables valued at more than 1.1 billion ringgit ($270.2 million) from properties linked to Najib. Fox News, "Malaysia ex-PM fails in media gag bid ahead of graft trial," 10 Aug. 2018 Don't leave valuables – including firearms – in the car. Laurel Andrews, Anchorage Daily News, "Protecting your property – and yourself – in Southcentral Alaska: Troopers and police share their tips," 1 July 2018 Cars are being stolen for the valuables inside, which are then traded, often for drugs. Laurel Andrews, Anchorage Daily News, "1990s Subaru vehicles are an emerging target for car thieves, Anchorage police say," 3 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'valuable.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of valuable

Adjective

circa 1576, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

circa 1775, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for valuable

Adjective

value entry 2 + -able

Noun

noun derivative of valuable entry 1

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Statistics for valuable

Last Updated

12 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for valuable

The first known use of valuable was circa 1576

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More Definitions for valuable

valuable

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of valuable

: worth a lot of money
: very useful or helpful
: important and limited in amount

valuable

adjective
valu·​able | \ ˈval-yə-wə-bəl How to pronounce valuable (audio) , ˈval-yə-bəl\

Kids Definition of valuable

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : worth a lot of money
2 : of great use or service “I must not take any more of your valuable time.”— E. B. White, Charlotte's Web

valuable

noun

Kids Definition of valuable (Entry 2 of 2)

: a personal possession of great value

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More from Merriam-Webster on valuable

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for valuable

Spanish Central: Translation of valuable

Nglish: Translation of valuable for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of valuable for Arabic Speakers

Comments on valuable

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