vagabond

noun
vag·​a·​bond | \ ˈva-gə-ˌbänd How to pronounce vagabond (audio) \

Definition of vagabond

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: a person who wanders from place to place without a fixed home : one leading a vagabond life especially : vagrant, tramp

vagabond

adjective

Definition of vagabond (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : moving from place to place without a fixed home : wandering
2a : of, relating to, or characteristic of a wanderer
b : leading an unsettled, irresponsible, or disreputable life

vagabond

verb
vagabonded; vagabonding; vagabonds

Definition of vagabond (Entry 3 of 3)

intransitive verb

: to wander in the manner of a vagabond : roam about

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Other Words from vagabond

Noun

vagabondage \ ˈva-​gə-​ˌbän-​dij How to pronounce vagabond (audio) \ noun
vagabondism \ ˈva-​gə-​ˌbän-​ˌdi-​zəm How to pronounce vagabond (audio) \ noun

Adjective

vagabondish \ ˈva-​gə-​ˌbän-​dish How to pronounce vagabond (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for vagabond

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Adjective

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Examples of vagabond in a Sentence

Noun be wary of the vagabonds in that corner of the city after they retired, the couple bought an RV and became footloose vagabonds Adjective a vagabond group of entertainers that performed in rough-and-tumble mining towns
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Owner of a consultancy for artists by day, Abdalla, 35, moonlights as a pro wrestling vagabond — a connoisseur of sports entertainment who has traversed the globe in pursuit of his passions: Art and wrestling. Dallas News, "Pro wrestling is beautiful — and this literary art journal captures its bumps and bruises in a new light," 15 Mar. 2021 Rick Pitino’s vagabond coaching career bathed in scandal and success brought him back to the NCAA Tournament. Dan Gelston, ajc, "Pitino back in the NCAA Tournament with MAAC champs Iona," 13 Mar. 2021 Enter the heavily tattooed, vagabond Teddy Prescott, the youngest son of the retirement home’s new owner, who roars in on a motorcycle ready to prove his worth to papa by working the grounds. Usa Today Life Staff, USA TODAY, "Rom-com reading: The best new books that made us laugh, swoon and root for love," 13 Mar. 2021 Zhao smooths away some of this social criticism, focusing on the practical particulars of vagabond life and the personal qualities — resilience, solidarity, thrift — of its adherents. New York Times, "‘Nomadland’ Review: The Unsettled Americans," 18 Feb. 2021 The film features must-watch performances by Tom Hanks as the title character, a naive Alabamian who unwittingly makes history, and Robin Wright as the troubled vagabond Jenny Curran, Forrest’s true love. Mary Colurso | Mcolurso@al.com, al, "14 Southern couples in pop culture that we simply can’t forget," 14 Feb. 2021 Quite the vagabond, Seth Curry has played for eight teams in seven seasons since breaking into the league. Bruce Jenkins, San Francisco Chronicle, "Despite their flaws, Nets are a team that bears watching," 12 Feb. 2021 But the vagabond existence really grew out of her mother’s constant search for work. James Rainey, Los Angeles Times, "L.A.’s first lady, Amy Wakeland, navigates shifting political fortunes in final Garcetti years," 7 Feb. 2021 Is Fern a vagabond, a nomad, a pioneer, or just a hermit? Armond White, National Review, "Nomadland Transforms America into Alienation Nation," 15 Jan. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective By modern standards, Wray's story feels like rock and roll lore that edges on pulp: As a child, he was raised in poverty in Dunn, North Carolina, and learned to play guitar from a vagabond bluesman named Hambone. Colin Stutz, Billboard, "Link Wray's Daughter Talks Rock Hall Nomination: 'Dad Is the Trunk of the Rock and Roll Tree'," 10 Oct. 2017 Hill’s book teems with sloppy and obvious devices (to the point of cliche), including a vagabond narrator (Steve Pacek) preempting for us the obvious songs that require no explanation. Jim Rutter, Philly.com, "Spectacular staging offsets lackluster score of 'Something Wicked'," 24 Sep. 2017 The vagabond fair has set up in a half-dozen different locations over the past 41 years, but it was forced to cancel its plans in recent years because of the problems securing city permits. Larry Barszewski, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Broward County Fair plans return after 5-year absence," 22 Sep. 2017 Spoiler alert: The Glass Castle, in theaters now and based on journalist Jeannette Walls’ 2005 best-selling memoir about her vagabond childhood, boasts one of the most unexpected, triumphant, hide-under-your-couch scenes in recent film history. Justine Harman, Glamour, "Max Greenfield Knows He Plays a Good 'Well-Intentioned' Jerk," 16 Aug. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'vagabond.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of vagabond

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

circa 1586, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for vagabond

Adjective

Middle English vacabounde, vagabounde, borrowed from Anglo-French & Late Latin; Anglo-French vacabunde, borrowed from Late Latin vagābundus, from Latin vagārī "to wander, roam" (verbal derivative of vagus "moving freely, wandering") + -bundus, deverbal adjective suffix (akin to Latin fuī "I was," Old English bēon "to be") — more at vague, be

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Time Traveler for vagabond

Time Traveler

The first known use of vagabond was in the 15th century

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Statistics for vagabond

Last Updated

30 Mar 2021

Cite this Entry

“Vagabond.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vagabond. Accessed 18 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for vagabond

vagabond

noun

English Language Learners Definition of vagabond

old-fashioned + literary : a person who travels from place to place and does not have a home or much money

vagabond

adjective
vag·​a·​bond | \ ˈva-gə-ˌbänd How to pronounce vagabond (audio) \

Kids Definition of vagabond

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: moving from place to place without a fixed home

vagabond

noun

Kids Definition of vagabond (Entry 2 of 2)

: a person who moves from place to place without a fixed home

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