vagabond

noun
vag·​a·​bond | \ ˈva-gə-ˌbänd How to pronounce vagabond (audio) \

Definition of vagabond

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: a person who wanders from place to place without a fixed home : one leading a vagabond life especially : vagrant, tramp

vagabond

adjective

Definition of vagabond (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : moving from place to place without a fixed home : wandering
2a : of, relating to, or characteristic of a wanderer
b : leading an unsettled, irresponsible, or disreputable life

vagabond

verb
vagabonded; vagabonding; vagabonds

Definition of vagabond (Entry 3 of 3)

intransitive verb

: to wander in the manner of a vagabond : roam about

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Other Words from vagabond

Noun

vagabondage \ ˈva-​gə-​ˌbän-​dij How to pronounce vagabondage (audio) \ noun
vagabondism \ ˈva-​gə-​ˌbän-​ˌdi-​zəm How to pronounce vagabondism (audio) \ noun

Adjective

vagabondish \ ˈva-​gə-​ˌbän-​dish How to pronounce vagabondish (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for vagabond

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Adjective

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Examples of vagabond in a Sentence

Noun be wary of the vagabonds in that corner of the city after they retired, the couple bought an RV and became footloose vagabonds Adjective a vagabond group of entertainers that performed in rough-and-tumble mining towns
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The Browns, long one of the AL's worst teams, assembled a vagabond roster that got the most out of its talent. Paul Newberry, Star Tribune, "Column: Remembering the last series to be played in one park," 18 Sep. 2020 There’s Frank Sinatra’s New York, all Rat Pack suits and discarded vagabond shoes. Raven Smith, Vogue, "On Madonna’s New Biopic and the Shifting New York Paradigm," 16 Sep. 2020 But meaningful political action, like good writing, requires a long-standing commitment, something that is by and large incompatible with a vagabond lifestyle. Connor Goodwin, The Atlantic, "Life on the Road Is More Than Inspiration for Your Novel," 27 Aug. 2020 Tobar’s latest novel builds on these interests, as Joe’s vagabond spirit opens up the clash between empire and its subjects beyond the United States and Central America. Siddhartha Deb, The New Republic, "Héctor Tobar’s Radical Road Trip Novel," 25 Aug. 2020 After a vagabond 2018 season split between Minnesota and the Yankees, Lynn realized his surroundings. Dallas News, "Lance Lynn is a lot of things, but most importantly, he’s become the ace of the Rangers’ pitching staff," 14 Aug. 2020 Israel Finkelstein’s vision of King David—the vagabond, the racketeer—helped make his career as an eminent Biblical archeologist. Ruth Margalit, The New Yorker, "In Search of King David’s Lost Empire," 22 June 2020 The Mannings lived a vagabond life, chasing the next team and the next contract. Jeff Seidel, Detroit Free Press, "Detroit Tigers might have their hand forced, if Matt Manning's dad has anything to say about it," 4 May 2020 Their adventure as earth vagabonds, also the name of their blog for budget travelers, hasn’t all been idyllic. cleveland, "Cleveland TV news couple travels the world as ex-pats in the age of coronavirus," 2 Apr. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective By modern standards, Wray's story feels like rock and roll lore that edges on pulp: As a child, he was raised in poverty in Dunn, North Carolina, and learned to play guitar from a vagabond bluesman named Hambone. Colin Stutz, Billboard, "Link Wray's Daughter Talks Rock Hall Nomination: 'Dad Is the Trunk of the Rock and Roll Tree'," 10 Oct. 2017 Hill’s book teems with sloppy and obvious devices (to the point of cliche), including a vagabond narrator (Steve Pacek) preempting for us the obvious songs that require no explanation. Jim Rutter, Philly.com, "Spectacular staging offsets lackluster score of 'Something Wicked'," 24 Sep. 2017 The vagabond fair has set up in a half-dozen different locations over the past 41 years, but it was forced to cancel its plans in recent years because of the problems securing city permits. Larry Barszewski, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Broward County Fair plans return after 5-year absence," 22 Sep. 2017 Spoiler alert: The Glass Castle, in theaters now and based on journalist Jeannette Walls’ 2005 best-selling memoir about her vagabond childhood, boasts one of the most unexpected, triumphant, hide-under-your-couch scenes in recent film history. Justine Harman, Glamour, "Max Greenfield Knows He Plays a Good 'Well-Intentioned' Jerk," 16 Aug. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'vagabond.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of vagabond

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

circa 1586, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for vagabond

Adjective

Middle English vacabounde, vagabounde, borrowed from Anglo-French & Late Latin; Anglo-French vacabunde, borrowed from Late Latin vagābundus, from Latin vagārī "to wander, roam" (verbal derivative of vagus "moving freely, wandering") + -bundus, deverbal adjective suffix (akin to Latin fuī "I was," Old English bēon "to be") — more at vague, be

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Time Traveler for vagabond

Time Traveler

The first known use of vagabond was in the 15th century

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Statistics for vagabond

Last Updated

25 Sep 2020

Cite this Entry

“Vagabond.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vagabond. Accessed 27 Sep. 2020.

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More Definitions for vagabond

vagabond

noun
How to pronounce vagabond (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of vagabond

old-fashioned + literary : a person who travels from place to place and does not have a home or much money

vagabond

adjective
vag·​a·​bond | \ ˈva-gə-ˌbänd How to pronounce vagabond (audio) \

Kids Definition of vagabond

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: moving from place to place without a fixed home

vagabond

noun

Kids Definition of vagabond (Entry 2 of 2)

: a person who moves from place to place without a fixed home

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