vacuity

noun

va·​cu·​i·​ty va-ˈkyü-ə-tē How to pronounce vacuity (audio)
və-
plural vacuities
1
: an empty space
2
: the state, fact, or quality of being vacuous
3
: something (such as an idea) that is vacuous or inane

Examples of vacuity in a Sentence

We tired of the vacuity of their conversation. the seemingly endless vacuity between settlements in the desert
Recent Examples on the Web The transpersonal quality of great art has its dark side in the vacuity of hotel paintings, Muzak, and formulaic paperback novels. Meghan O'Gieblyn, WIRED, 20 Feb. 2024 Beckmann renders the physical and psychical trauma in drawings and works on paper made in the years just after the war: A disfigured soldier rides a tram with a bandage wrapped across his face, probably hiding the vacuity that was once his nose. Philip Kennicott, Washington Post, 15 Dec. 2023 His article in Harper’s has something of Joan Didion’s wry bemusement about the vacuity of modern celebrity. Alexander Nazaryan, Los Angeles Times, 2 Oct. 2023 The vacuity of the space around an ion qubit means that its state (0, 1 or both) is relatively unimpacted by state-destroying air particles. Katherine Wright, Scientific American, 28 Sep. 2023 For decades, the industry and the media have mistaken Anderson’s introverted nature for vacuity. Tatiana Siegel, Variety, 26 Jan. 2023 Instead of interrogating Indian officials on their Ukraine policy, or providing space for in-depth discussion of what India should do, Indian outlets echo the vacuity of Foreign Ministry pronouncements. Anjani Jain, Fortune, 23 Mar. 2022 Kaokept, who charms as the Balladeer, recedes into sympathetic vacuity when playing Oswald. Los Angeles Times, 23 Feb. 2022 Meanwhile, traffic still roars over the Theodore Roosevelt Bridge, and visitors must still cross the dispiriting vacuity of Virginia Avenue to get to the center. Washington Post, 3 Sep. 2021

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'vacuity.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English vacuitee, borrowed from Latin vacuitās, from vacuus "empty, unoccupied" + -itās -ity — more at vacuum entry 1

First Known Use

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of vacuity was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near vacuity

Cite this Entry

“Vacuity.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vacuity. Accessed 13 Jul. 2024.

Kids Definition

vacuity

noun
va·​cu·​ity
va-ˈkyü-ət-ē,
və-
plural vacuities
1
: an empty space
2
: the quality or state of being vacuous
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