uproar

noun
up·roar | \ ˈəp-ˌrȯr \

Definition of uproar 

: a state of commotion, excitement, or violent disturbance

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Examples of uproar in a Sentence

There was a lot of public uproar over the proposed jail. There have been uproars in the past over similar proposals. The proposal caused an uproar. The town was in an uproar over the proposal to build a jail.
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Recent Examples on the Web

In a brief phone call with the president that Read sought on Tuesday night to defuse the uproar, the CEO backed down and deferred the hikes. Kate Sheridan, STAT, "How Pfizer’s CEO flew under the political radar with price hikes — until he tangled with Trump," 13 July 2018 Reaction to these cases, however, pales in comparison to the current uproar around USC’s handling of the Tyndall allegations. Alex Bhattacharji, Town & Country, "Can USC Survive Scandal and Shed Its Spoiled-Kid Reputation Once and For All?," 10 July 2018 Within months of the fiery uproar, the facility, a prison in Raymondville for immigrants awaiting deportation, was shut down. Bloomberg.com, "Prisonville, Texas, Hopes to Reboot Its Economy on the Back of Trump’s Immigration Crackdown," 28 June 2018 There was an uproar this week when the Department of Health and Human Services proposed a change to the Title X program, which provides low-income women (and some men) access to family planning services. Washington Post, "The Health 202: Why suing over new family planning restrictions could be hard," 25 May 2018 There was the uproar over a less-than-flattering courtroom sketch of Tom Brady. Christina Capatides, CBS News, "Brandi Chastain's Hall of Fame plaque looks nothing like her and the internet is having a field day," 22 May 2018 There would be a diplomatic uproar, and Mr. Trump would be denounced by the usual suspects. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "Europe, Trump and the Iran Deal," 26 Apr. 2018 There was such an uproar for the product, in fact, that several thousand customers had to be placed on a waitlist. Lauren Swanson, Allure, "GloPro's Best-Selling Lip Microneedler May Be an At-Home Alternative to Fillers (Exclusive)," 9 Feb. 2018 There was similar uproar in 2015 following the deaths of Elizabeth Braddock, 32, and her daughter, Karissa Wise, 6. Michelle Hunter, NOLA.com, "Mother still critical after fatal Metairie canal crash claims baby's life," 18 Jan. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'uproar.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of uproar

1526, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for uproar

by folk etymology from Dutch oproer, from Middle Dutch, from op up (akin to Old English ūp) + roer motion; akin to Old English hrēran to stir

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Dictionary Entries near uproar

uprise

uprising

upriver

uproar

uproarious

uproll

uproot

Statistics for uproar

Last Updated

14 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for uproar

The first known use of uproar was in 1526

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More Definitions for uproar

uproar

noun

English Language Learners Definition of uproar

: a situation in which many people are upset, angry, or disturbed by something

uproar

noun
up·roar | \ ˈəp-ˌrȯr \

Kids Definition of uproar

: a state of commotion, excitement, or violent disturbance Now the dining room was in an uproar … as the men jumped to their feet in confusion. —Judith Berry Griffin, Phoebe the Spy

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Comments on uproar

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occurring twice a year or every two years

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