underwing

noun
un·​der·​wing | \ ˈən-dər-ˌwiŋ How to pronounce underwing (audio) \

Definition of underwing

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : one of the posterior wings of an insect
2 : any of various noctuid moths (especially genus Catocala) that have the hind wings banded with contrasting colors (such as red and black)

called also underwing moth

3 : the underside of a bird's wing

underwing

adjective

Definition of underwing (Entry 2 of 2)

: placed or growing underneath the wing underwing rockets

Examples of underwing in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The Claudina butterfly’s underwings are intricately patterned. Meilan Solly, Smithsonian Magazine, "The World’s Most Interesting Insects," 29 Apr. 2020 This rainforest butterfly has vivid crimson patches on its upper wings, but its underwings are arguably even more spectacular. Meilan Solly, Smithsonian Magazine, "The World’s Most Interesting Insects," 29 Apr. 2020 For instance, initial evidence suggests that European robins, yellow underwing moths, and perhaps even cricket frogs can do so. Fiona Mcmillan, National Geographic, "From dung beetles to seals, these animals navigate by the stars," 4 Nov. 2019 Easily identifiable by its gray, spotted wings and bright red underwings, the insect could threaten billions of dollars worth of crops in Pennsylvania, such as apples, grapes, and hops. Jennifer Leman, Popular Mechanics, "We Must Destroy the Spotted Lanternfly, a Useless Garbage Insect," 20 Sep. 2019 Genes for yellow- and red- underwings remain separated east and west of the Rockies. Steven Austad, AL.com, "'Cheddar Man' shows that race is only skin deep," 17 Feb. 2018 Each jet carried an underwing pod designed to collect particles from the atmosphere. Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, "These Are the Planes the U.S. and Japan Use to Check on North Korea's Nuke Tests," 7 Sep. 2017 The large yellow underwing moth, for instance, can use the moon’s azimuth (or horizontal bearing) to help orient its flight—a skill that other creatures, such as sand fleas, also employ to great effect. National Geographic, "Sex, Death, and Pollination: How the Moon Changes Life on Earth," 6 July 2017 The large yellow underwing moth, for instance, can use the moon’s azimuth (or horizontal bearing) to help orient its flight—a skill that other creatures, such as sand fleas, also employ to great effect. National Geographic, "Sex, Death, and Pollination: How the Moon Changes Life on Earth," 6 July 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'underwing.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of underwing

Noun

1535, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1896, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for underwing

Time Traveler

The first known use of underwing was in 1535

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Cite this Entry

“Underwing.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/underwing. Accessed 19 Sep. 2020.

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