trumpet

noun
trum·​pet | \ ˈtrəm-pət How to pronounce trumpet (audio) \

Definition of trumpet

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a wind instrument consisting of a conical or cylindrical usually metal tube, a cup-shaped mouthpiece, and a flared bell specifically : a valved brass instrument having a cylindrical tube with two turns and a usual range from F sharp below middle C upward for 2¹/₂ octaves
b : a musical instrument (such as a cornet) resembling a trumpet
2 : a trumpet player
3 : something that resembles a trumpet or its tonal quality: such as
a : a funnel-shaped instrument (such as a megaphone) for collecting, directing, or intensifying sound
b(1) : a stentorian voice
(2) : a penetrating cry (as of an elephant)

trumpet

verb
trumpeted; trumpeting; trumpets

Definition of trumpet (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to blow a trumpet
2 : to make a sound suggestive of that of a trumpet

transitive verb

: to sound or proclaim on or as if on a trumpet trumpet the news

Illustration of trumpet

Illustration of trumpet

Noun

trumpet 1a

In the meaning defined above

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Other Words from trumpet

Noun

trumpetlike \ ˈtrəm-​pət-​ˌlīk How to pronounce trumpetlike (audio) \ adjective

Examples of trumpet in a Sentence

Noun the trumpet of a flower Verb He likes to trumpet his own achievements. The law was trumpeted as a solution to everything.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Aaron Copland’s Quiet City imagines a nighttime with haunting English horn and trumpet solos. Scott Cantrell, Dallas News, "Fabio Luisi returns to DSO with storytelling music," 3 Jan. 2020 DeAtley performed alongside Megan, who played the trumpet. Hannah Natanson, Washington Post, "When the Dayton shooter killed his sister, he cut short a life full of promise, friends say," 6 Aug. 2019 The teenage boys are preoccupied with trumpet solos in music class, cute girls on the block, good fried chicken, and the Yankees. Candice Frederick, Teen Vogue, "Netflix's "When They See Us" Is A Lesson On the Danger of Implicit Bias," 31 May 2019 Over the course of his career, Newton has blasted trumpet parts alongside Cee Lo Green, Chaka Khan, Stevie Wonder and Ron Isley. oregonlive, "Live music in Portland: 25 January concerts you won’t want to miss," 30 Dec. 2019 Linda Porter, Blaine May the trumpets sound for the residents on Summit Avenue who adorn their dwellings with holiday decorations and lights. Sainted & Tainted Writers, Twin Cities, "Sainted: A little help turned into a lot of help. Thanks, Morgan!," 28 Dec. 2019 The town hall has illuminated giant angels with trumpets above the narrow street that leads to the cathedral. The Economist, "France’s complicated relationship with Christmas," 18 Dec. 2019 Charlotte Connolly will be playing trumpet with the Middle School G/T Symphonic Band. Tracy Trobridge, baltimoresun.com, "Glenwood/Glenelg/Dayton: Christmas parade in Lisbon helps fight hunger," 11 Dec. 2019 Live marimbas and trumpets provided playful melodies. Morena Duwe, Billboard, "Meet Meute, the German Marching Band That Plays Only Electronic Music Covers," 11 Dec. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The issue of economic justice that Warren trumpeted back then would go on to become the defining cause of her political life — and the basis of her 2020 presidential campaign. Gilbert Garcia, ExpressNews.com, "Team Warren stakes its claim on Texas," 19 Oct. 2019 Notably, when Julie Swetnick’s claims collapsed during an MSNBC interview, many of the same media figures who trumpeted the claims and scorned all doubts fell silent. The Editors, National Review, "The Ongoing Smear Campaign against Brett Kavanaugh," 16 Sep. 2019 Fischer's already begun to hit the airwaves to bolster Bloomberg's efforts, trumpeting the former New York City mayor's business success, mayoral experience and philanthropic efforts. Darcy Costello, The Courier-Journal, "Greg Fischer becomes 'America's mayor' in 2020. Here's what that means for Louisville," 30 Dec. 2019 On Wednesday, the New York Times and The Washington Post presented the House’s articles of impeachment against President Trump as history for the ages, trumpeting the news in big type at the tops of their front pages. Washington Post, "Headlines, in print and on screens, provide a snapshot of news delivered to a fractured nation," 11 Dec. 2019 Merit itself is not a genuine excellence but rather—like the false virtues that aristocrats trumpeted in the ancien régime—a pretense, constructed to rationalize an unjust distribution of advantage. Louis Menand, The New Yorker, "Is Meritocracy Making Everyone Miserable?," 23 Sep. 2019 The settlement has been widely trumpeted as offering a $125 cash payout to victims of the September 2017 hack who already have credit monitoring service. David Z. Morris, Fortune, "Equifax Data Breach Victims Drained Its $31 Million Settlement Fund in a Week," 31 July 2019 While the turn to profit was trumpeted high in its press release, buried much lower was the minor detail that revenue for the business actually fell 20 percent from a year earlier. Tim Culpan | Bloomberg, Washington Post, "Lenovo’s Mobile Profits Are a Bit of a Mirage," 20 Feb. 2019 Her private trials—a miscarriage, IVF treatments, couples counseling—have already been trumpeted by a gossipy media. Kay S. Hymowitz, WSJ, "‘Becoming’ Review: The Sound of Striving," 12 Nov. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'trumpet.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of trumpet

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1530, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for trumpet

Noun

Middle English trompette, from Anglo-French, from trumpe trump

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Time Traveler for trumpet

Time Traveler

The first known use of trumpet was in the 14th century

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Statistics for trumpet

Last Updated

18 Jan 2020

Cite this Entry

“Trumpet.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/trumpetlike. Accessed 22 January 2020.

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More Definitions for trumpet

trumpet

noun
How to pronounce trumpet (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of trumpet

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a brass musical instrument that you blow into that has three buttons which you press to play different notes
: something shaped like a trumpet

trumpet

verb

English Language Learners Definition of trumpet (Entry 2 of 2)

: to praise (something) loudly and publicly especially in a way that is annoying
: to make a sound like a trumpet

trumpet

noun
trum·​pet | \ ˈtrəm-pət How to pronounce trumpet (audio) \

Kids Definition of trumpet

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a brass musical instrument that consists of a tube formed into a long loop with a wide opening at one end and that has valves by which different tones are produced
2 : something that is shaped like a trumpet the trumpet of a lily

trumpet

verb
trumpeted; trumpeting

Kids Definition of trumpet (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to blow a trumpet
2 : to make a sound like that of a trumpet The elephant trumpeted loudly.
3 : to praise (something) loudly and publicly

Other Words from trumpet

trumpeter noun

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More from Merriam-Webster on trumpet

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for trumpet

Spanish Central: Translation of trumpet

Nglish: Translation of trumpet for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of trumpet for Arabic Speakers

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