trumpet

noun
trum·​pet | \ ˈtrəm-pət \

Definition of trumpet 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a wind instrument consisting of a conical or cylindrical usually metal tube, a cup-shaped mouthpiece, and a flared bell specifically : a valved brass instrument having a cylindrical tube with two turns and a usual range from F sharp below middle C upward for 2¹/₂ octaves
b : a musical instrument (such as a cornet) resembling a trumpet
2 : a trumpet player
3 : something that resembles a trumpet or its tonal quality: such as
a : a funnel-shaped instrument (such as a megaphone) for collecting, directing, or intensifying sound
b(1) : a stentorian voice
(2) : a penetrating cry (as of an elephant)

trumpet

verb
trumpeted; trumpeting; trumpets

Definition of trumpet (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to blow a trumpet
2 : to make a sound suggestive of that of a trumpet

transitive verb

: to sound or proclaim on or as if on a trumpet trumpet the news

Illustration of trumpet

Illustration of trumpet

Noun

trumpet 1a

In the meaning defined above

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Other Words from trumpet

Noun

trumpetlike \ ˈtrəm-​pət-​ˌlīk \ adjective

Examples of trumpet in a Sentence

Noun

the trumpet of a flower

Verb

He likes to trumpet his own achievements. The law was trumpeted as a solution to everything.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

If not for his trumpet, Pope might have been on patrol with him. Courtland Milloy, Washington Post, "For one musician, D.C. was the place for black entertainers. The ’68 riots changed everything.," 3 Apr. 2018 At one point, seven-year-old Savannah was photographed pretending to play the trumpet, probably miming along to the blaring brass fanfare ahead of the bride's entrance. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Prince George and Savannah Philips Steal the Show at Princess Eugenie's Wedding," 12 Oct. 2018 But the Alteñas are an all-female mariachi group — and since their inception in 2002, their rhythmic guitarrón strums and proud trumpet blasts have bested many of their male counterparts at invitation-only competitions. Harper Smith, Allure, "The Beauty Secrets of Mariachi Las Alteñas, an All-Female Mariachi Band in the Heart of Texas," 13 Nov. 2018 There are moments of brilliant soliloquy too, showcasing, among other things, Mr. Morris’s finely etched electric guitar lines and Mr. Haynes’s disarmingly direct trumpet tones. Larry Blumenfeld, WSJ, "‘Igbó Alákorin (The Singer’s Grove), Vol. I & II’ by David Virelles and ‘Pillars’ by Tyshawn Sorey Reviews," 29 Oct. 2018 And in another moment, five-year-old Prince George was seen covering his mouth in laughter, probably in response to his cousin's air-trumpet. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Prince George and Savannah Philips Steal the Show at Princess Eugenie's Wedding," 12 Oct. 2018 These holy woods are also home to the mystical Yamabushi, mountain hermit monks in Merlin-like white robes carrying horagai, or conch-shell trumpets. Adam H. Graham, Condé Nast Traveler, "Slow Skiing in Japan's Deep North," 11 Oct. 2018 In childhood and college, Will played the trumpet but switched to mainly guitar for many years before finding a love of drumming. Jim Stingl, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Stingl: Educators spread the joy of music to many. And they accidentally led me to my wife," 6 July 2018 This dog was struck with musical inspiration after a man on a nearby park bench played the trumpet. Don Maines, Houston Chronicle, "Trumpet player up for music fest’s challenge," 31 May 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

In the distance looms the Gothic cupola of the parliament, a fairy-tale concoction trumpeting the pride of a nation that once commanded more than four times its current size. András Szántó, Condé Nast Traveler, "Why Budapest Is Europe's Unlikely Capital of Hedonism," 29 Aug. 2018 Nvidia has been loudly trumpeting its interest in global illumination lighting systems and on delivering hardware that can make this rendering pipeline far more efficient ever since a major reveal at this year's Game Developers Conference. Sam Machkovech, Ars Technica, "Nvidia’s new RTX 2080, 2080 Ti video cards ship on Sept. 20, starting at $699," 20 Aug. 2018 For decades, health reformers had trumpeted the benefits of fitness, and during the 1880s, the United States saw a spike in organized physical activity. Aaron Gilbreath, Longreads, "The Wheel, the Woman, and the Human Body," 6 July 2018 In a fact sheet, for example, the EPA trumpets its finding that ACE could save power plants up to $6.4 billion in compliance costs. David Roberts, Vox, "The 6 things you most need to know about Trump’s new climate plan," 24 Aug. 2018 Hecht, city and state officials have been trumpeting the deal with DXC Technology since it was announced in November, describing the 2,000 jobs the company will bring to New Orleans as historic and game-changing. Kevin Litten, NOLA.com, "DXC Technology will create another 1,600 local jobs: GNO Inc.," 14 Mar. 2018 Pyongyang's frantic engagement efforts are a dramatic departure from 2017, when North Korea trumpeted the advances of its nuclear weapons program, threatening the US territory of Guam and claiming its rockets could hit the US mainland. Katie Hunt, CNN, "Why Kim Jong Un came in from the cold: 3 theories," 22 Apr. 2018 Though David Davis, Britain’s Brexit secretary, trumpeted on Monday the fact that Britain would be able to negotiate and sign non-European trade deals during the transition, if not to implement them, experts were unimpressed. Stephen Castle, New York Times, "In Brexit Give-and-Take, Britain Gives and the E.U. Takes," 21 Mar. 2018 Rosier carries plenty of experience but that might not be enough to hold of trumpeted underclassmen N’Kosi Perry and Jarren Williams. Matt Murschel, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Five storylines to watch in the ACC this spring," 21 Mar. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'trumpet.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of trumpet

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1530, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for trumpet

Noun

Middle English trompette, from Anglo-French, from trumpe trump

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Statistics for trumpet

Last Updated

4 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for trumpet

The first known use of trumpet was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for trumpet

trumpet

noun

English Language Learners Definition of trumpet

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a brass musical instrument that you blow into that has three buttons which you press to play different notes

: something shaped like a trumpet

trumpet

verb

English Language Learners Definition of trumpet (Entry 2 of 2)

: to praise (something) loudly and publicly especially in a way that is annoying

: to make a sound like a trumpet

trumpet

noun
trum·​pet | \ ˈtrəm-pət \

Kids Definition of trumpet

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a brass musical instrument that consists of a tube formed into a long loop with a wide opening at one end and that has valves by which different tones are produced
2 : something that is shaped like a trumpet the trumpet of a lily

trumpet

verb
trumpeted; trumpeting

Kids Definition of trumpet (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to blow a trumpet
2 : to make a sound like that of a trumpet The elephant trumpeted loudly.
3 : to praise (something) loudly and publicly

Other Words from trumpet

trumpeter noun

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More from Merriam-Webster on trumpet

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for trumpet

Spanish Central: Translation of trumpet

Nglish: Translation of trumpet for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of trumpet for Arabic Speakers

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