trumpet

noun
trum·​pet | \ ˈtrəm-pət How to pronounce trumpet (audio) \

Definition of trumpet

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a wind instrument consisting of a conical or cylindrical usually metal tube, a cup-shaped mouthpiece, and a flared bell specifically : a valved brass instrument having a cylindrical tube with two turns and a usual range from F sharp below middle C upward for 2¹/₂ octaves
b : a musical instrument (such as a cornet) resembling a trumpet
2 : a trumpet player
3 : something that resembles a trumpet or its tonal quality: such as
a : a funnel-shaped instrument (such as a megaphone) for collecting, directing, or intensifying sound
b(1) : a stentorian voice
(2) : a penetrating cry (as of an elephant)

trumpet

verb
trumpeted; trumpeting; trumpets

Definition of trumpet (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to blow a trumpet
2 : to make a sound suggestive of that of a trumpet

transitive verb

: to sound or proclaim on or as if on a trumpet trumpet the news

Illustration of trumpet

Illustration of trumpet

Noun

trumpet 1a

In the meaning defined above

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Other Words from trumpet

Noun

trumpetlike \ ˈtrəm-​pət-​ˌlīk How to pronounce trumpet (audio) \ adjective

Examples of trumpet in a Sentence

Noun the trumpet of a flower Verb He likes to trumpet his own achievements. The law was trumpeted as a solution to everything.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun As Levee, an ambitious trumpet player fighting for his place in a system rigged against him, Boseman delivers a spellbinding performance, brash and charming, but also, underneath his bravado, deeply wounded by loss and injustice. Los Angeles Times, "How do this year’s best picture nominations stack up to the past?," 2 Apr. 2021 Birdsong filled the forest, interrupted periodically by hoots from the trees and the hippos' trumpet-like exhalations. Gina Decaprio Vercesi, Travel + Leisure, "Deep in Uganda's Kyambura Gorge, An Endangered Group of Chimpanzees Has Survived Against All Odds," 20 Mar. 2021 Pete Ellman has played the trumpet with music legends like Aretha Franklin, Lynyrd Skynyrd and Wayne Newton, and his big band performed in locations all around the Chicago area. Suzanne Baker, chicagotribune.com, "Pandemic anniversary: Naperville musician grapples with sound of silence as he sees his jobs, music store falter," 12 Mar. 2021 His father, an Italian immigrant, had played trumpet in a band. Globe Staff, BostonGlobe.com, "Chick Corea, pioneering jazz fusion keyboardist, dies at 79," 11 Feb. 2021 Steve proudly played the bugle for three decades in Civil War re-enactments and played trumpet in the orchestra for Salem First Church of the Nazarene. Staff And Wire Reports, oregonlive, "Portraits of 20 Oregonians who died in the 2020 coronavirus pandemic," 24 Dec. 2020 So, soon after $1,400 from the federal government landed in his bank account last week, Sanchez, a 28-year-old trumpet player in Sacramento, California, moved all but $200 of it into his Robinhood online trading account. BostonGlobe.com, "Recast as ‘stimmies,’ federal relief checks drive a stock buying spree," 21 Mar. 2021 So, soon after $1,400 from the federal government landed in his bank account last week, Mr. Sanchez, a 28-year-old trumpet player in Sacramento, moved all but $200 of it into his Robinhood online trading account. Matt Phillips, New York Times, "Recast as ‘Stimmies,’ Federal Relief Checks Drive a Stock Buying Spree," 21 Mar. 2021 My father was a professional trumpet player in the Army's Old Guard Fife and Drum Corp, which is the President's band. Lisa Kocay, Forbes, "Joel Holmes Brings ‘Blackness Back Into House Music’ With Live Jazz Infused Electronic Music EP ‘Osmosis’," 12 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb But Trump shrugged off the criticisms and used his statement to trumpet his role in developing vaccines. Rob Crilly, Washington Examiner, "Trump blasts Fauci and Birx for 'reinventing history' after they criticize his pandemic response," 29 Mar. 2021 The honors, which automakers often trumpet in marketing campaigns, reflect an assessment of crash-test performance, advanced safety features, engineering and design. Nathan Bomey, USA TODAY, "These are the safest new cars, trucks, SUVs of 2021, according to IIHS," 24 Feb. 2021 Next is Selection Sunday, which will trumpet March Madness. Mike Bass, The Enquirer, "Mike Bass column: Here are 10 things sports fans learned in a year of COVID-19," 12 Mar. 2021 If, as predicted, studies in Pennsylvania fail to find clear causality for the cancers, gas-drilling companies may trumpet that as a victory. Eliza Griswold, The New Yorker, "When the Kids Started Getting Sick," 2 Mar. 2021 San Antonio officials have used the wireless emergency alert system to trumpet a statewide mask mandate and warn against social gatherings ahead of holidays. San Antonio Express-News, "Express Briefing: How Air Force basic training outworked COVID in S.A.," 1 Mar. 2021 As the biggest companies strive to trumpet their environmental activism, the need to match words with deeds is becoming increasingly important. New York Times, "What’s Really Behind Corporate Promises on Climate Change?," 22 Feb. 2021 What the education secretary does have is a bully pulpit – a megaphone to trumpet the president's ideals and priorities. Joey Garrison, USA TODAY, "Biden poised to pick Connecticut schools chief Miguel Cardona as Education secretary, reports say," 22 Dec. 2020 But five days into the largest vaccination campaign in the nation's history, Trump has held no public events to trumpet the rollout. The Associated Press, NOLA.com, "Mike Pence, wife Karen, get coronavirus vaccine injections on live TV," 18 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'trumpet.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of trumpet

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1530, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for trumpet

Noun

Middle English trompette, from Anglo-French, from trumpe trump

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Time Traveler for trumpet

Time Traveler

The first known use of trumpet was in the 14th century

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Statistics for trumpet

Last Updated

10 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Trumpet.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/trumpet. Accessed 21 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for trumpet

trumpet

noun

English Language Learners Definition of trumpet

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a brass musical instrument that you blow into that has three buttons which you press to play different notes
: something shaped like a trumpet

trumpet

verb

English Language Learners Definition of trumpet (Entry 2 of 2)

: to praise (something) loudly and publicly especially in a way that is annoying
: to make a sound like a trumpet

trumpet

noun
trum·​pet | \ ˈtrəm-pət How to pronounce trumpet (audio) \

Kids Definition of trumpet

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a brass musical instrument that consists of a tube formed into a long loop with a wide opening at one end and that has valves by which different tones are produced
2 : something that is shaped like a trumpet the trumpet of a lily

trumpet

verb
trumpeted; trumpeting

Kids Definition of trumpet (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to blow a trumpet
2 : to make a sound like that of a trumpet The elephant trumpeted loudly.
3 : to praise (something) loudly and publicly

Other Words from trumpet

trumpeter noun

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Comments on trumpet

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