trumpet

noun
trum·​pet | \ ˈtrəm-pət How to pronounce trumpet (audio) \

Definition of trumpet

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a wind instrument consisting of a conical or cylindrical usually metal tube, a cup-shaped mouthpiece, and a flared bell specifically : a valved brass instrument having a cylindrical tube with two turns and a usual range from F sharp below middle C upward for 2¹/₂ octaves
b : a musical instrument (such as a cornet) resembling a trumpet
2 : a trumpet player
3 : something that resembles a trumpet or its tonal quality: such as
a : a funnel-shaped instrument (such as a megaphone) for collecting, directing, or intensifying sound
b(1) : a stentorian voice
(2) : a penetrating cry (as of an elephant)

trumpet

verb
trumpeted; trumpeting; trumpets

Definition of trumpet (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to blow a trumpet
2 : to make a sound suggestive of that of a trumpet

transitive verb

: to sound or proclaim on or as if on a trumpet trumpet the news

Illustration of trumpet

Illustration of trumpet

Noun

trumpet 1a

In the meaning defined above

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Other Words from trumpet

Noun

trumpetlike \ ˈtrəm-​pət-​ˌlīk How to pronounce trumpetlike (audio) \ adjective

Examples of trumpet in a Sentence

Noun

the trumpet of a flower

Verb

He likes to trumpet his own achievements. The law was trumpeted as a solution to everything.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Michael’s primary instrument is the trumpet; Lucifer’s, the trombone; Eve’s, the basset horn. Alex Ross, The New Yorker, "Karlheinz Stockhausen Composes the Cosmos," 17 June 2019 The solemn accompaniment of pianississimo trumpets and trombones suggests a tentative rite of renewal and regeneration, which is what this opera offered to the postwar world in 1919. Larry Wolff, The New York Review of Books, "A Resonant Centenary for Strauss at the Vienna State Opera," 13 June 2019 Most striking were the yuccas, which flash in the sun like trumpets. Chris Erskine, latimes.com, "In the glow of a mountain campsite that’s closer than you’d believe," 13 June 2019 Chugiak High band director Kody Trombley looked over high-end trumpets. Matt Tunseth, Anchorage Daily News, "Eagle River’s only music store is going out of business after 25 years," 5 June 2019 The Top of the Standard instantly commands your attention with the bar’s gilded centerpiece, reminiscent of a trumpet flute, and its floor-to-ceiling windows that provide incredible panoramic views of New York City and the Hudson River. Christina Liao, Vogue, "8 Celebrity-Favorite Hotels for Met Gala Weekend," 2 May 2019 The track’s hazy sounds have a similar appeal: Over a background of gently spinning harmonies, a small corps of trumpets restates its part over and over, warped a little differently each time. New York Times, "The Playlist: Justin Bieber Boosts a Friend, and 14 More New Songs," 6 Apr. 2018 Cue an incredibly sad but hilarious montage of Diggy sitting alone with the trumpet player. Anna Moeslein, Glamour, "Bachelor in Paradise Season 5, Episode 10 Recap: These Breakups Are Hard to Watch," 10 Sep. 2018 And the trumpet in the background makes this song ideal for after dinner drinks. 2. Amina Lake Abdelrahman, Good Housekeeping, "20 Thanksgiving Songs to Rock Your Turkey Day Playlist," 30 Aug. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Perhaps the most sweeping embrace of facial recognition has come from China, which has trumpeted its ability to find a single criminal amidst giant crowds. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "San Francisco Is Preparing to Ban Facial Recognition Technology," 14 May 2019 The debunked theory that the MMR vaccine causes autism has been trumpeted on platforms such as YouTube and Facebook, as well as through professional-looking websites and pamphlets, and by celebrities such as Jenny McCarthy. Ryan Blethen, The Seattle Times, "How do you persuade people to vaccinate? Clark County measles outbreak highlights the difficulties," 13 Apr. 2019 Even ten years ago, headlines trumpeted that boys were failing: falling behind girls in academic achievement, suffering from more mental illness, succumbing to drug abuse, and getting into more trouble. Kate Stone Lombardi, Good Housekeeping, "Studies Show Boys Who Are Close to Their Mothers Do Better, Physically and Psychologically," 30 Apr. 2019 As part of its second quarter of 2018 earnings announcement on Wednesday, the company trumpeted a huge jump in both year-over-year revenue (42 percent) and profit (31 percent). Cyrus Farivar, Ars Technica, "Facebook stock dives nearly 20% on warning of slow revenue growth," 25 July 2018 Some officers use orange safety cones as trumpets as they dance. Dana Hedgpeth, Washington Post, "Dancing Virginia police officers make ‘lip sync challenge’ video viewed by millions," 11 July 2018 But on June 27th newspapers trumpeted the discovery of an enormous natural-gas field, called Noor, off the coast of North Sinai (see map). The Economist, "Egypt is optimistic about new gas discoveries in the Mediterranean," 5 July 2018 Seeking to convince voters otherwise, Republicans have trumpeted announcements from companies that credit the tax overhaul as the reason their workers are getting bonuses and wage increases. Washington Post, "Trump accuses Dems of ‘rooting against’ NKorea talks," 25 May 2018 Ohio has trumpeted more than $1 billion spent on policy efforts, including expanding naloxone access and painkiller-abuse prevention. Jon Kamp, WSJ, "Deaths Level Off—and Even Decline—in Some Opioid Hotspots," 31 Dec. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'trumpet.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of trumpet

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1530, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for trumpet

Noun

Middle English trompette, from Anglo-French, from trumpe trump

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Statistics for trumpet

Last Updated

21 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for trumpet

The first known use of trumpet was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for trumpet

trumpet

noun

English Language Learners Definition of trumpet

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a brass musical instrument that you blow into that has three buttons which you press to play different notes
: something shaped like a trumpet

trumpet

verb

English Language Learners Definition of trumpet (Entry 2 of 2)

: to praise (something) loudly and publicly especially in a way that is annoying
: to make a sound like a trumpet

trumpet

noun
trum·​pet | \ ˈtrəm-pət How to pronounce trumpet (audio) \

Kids Definition of trumpet

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a brass musical instrument that consists of a tube formed into a long loop with a wide opening at one end and that has valves by which different tones are produced
2 : something that is shaped like a trumpet the trumpet of a lily

trumpet

verb
trumpeted; trumpeting

Kids Definition of trumpet (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to blow a trumpet
2 : to make a sound like that of a trumpet The elephant trumpeted loudly.
3 : to praise (something) loudly and publicly

Other Words from trumpet

trumpeter noun

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More from Merriam-Webster on trumpet

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for trumpet

Spanish Central: Translation of trumpet

Nglish: Translation of trumpet for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of trumpet for Arabic Speakers

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