treacherous

adjective
treach·​er·​ous | \ ˈtre-chə-rəs How to pronounce treacherous (audio) , ˈtrech-rəs\

Definition of treacherous

1a : likely to betray trust : unreliable a treacherous memory
b : providing insecure footing or support treacherous quicksand
c : marked by hidden dangers, hazards, or perils
2 : characterized by or manifesting treachery : perfidious

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Other Words from treacherous

treacherously adverb
treacherousness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for treacherous

faithless, false, disloyal, traitorous, treacherous, perfidious mean untrue to what should command one's fidelity or allegiance. faithless applies to any failure to keep a promise or pledge or any breach of allegiance or loyalty. faithless allies false stresses the fact of failing to be true in any manner ranging from fickleness to cold treachery. betrayed by false friends disloyal implies a lack of complete faithfulness to a friend, cause, leader, or country. disloyal to their country traitorous implies either actual treason or a serious betrayal of trust. traitorous acts punishable by death treacherous implies readiness to betray trust or confidence. a treacherous adviser perfidious adds to faithless the implication of an incapacity for fidelity or reliability. a perfidious double-crosser

Examples of treacherous in a Sentence

a treacherous act of betrayal They were not prepared to hike over such treacherous terrain. The snow made their hike all the more treacherous. Discussions about money can lead couples into treacherous territory.
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Recent Examples on the Web

The quick and slippery nature of grass makes it a treacherous surface—and therefore one that can be conducive to massive upsets. Kevin Craft, The Atlantic, "What the Men Can Learn From the Women at Wimbledon," 2 July 2019 The Swiss capital was staging its first Formula E race, marked by a first-lap pile up then a thrilling climax as a late rain shower made the 2.75km, 14-turn circuit treacherous. Paul Gittings, CNN, "Bern E-Prix: Jean Eric-Vergne closes on second straight title after Swiss success," 22 June 2019 And then Klay Thompson, who had been carrying his team through the treacherous mines and tripwires of Game 6. Ann Killion, SFChronicle.com, "It wasn’t the kind of finish Warriors and their fans wanted," 13 June 2019 After that, things take a sudden, treacherous turn for the worst. Natasha Frost, Quartz, "Amazon’s AI is being used to rescue children from sex trafficking," 13 June 2019 All will have stories of cowering in their flimsy houses while bombs fell, of the deadening existence of refugee camps, or of escapes through treacherous seas and perilous highways to uncertain lives in strange lands. The New York Review of Books, "Charles Glass," 7 Feb. 2019 The system, much improved, still has a long and treacherous road ahead to navigate. Roy S. Johnson | Rjohnson@al.com, al.com, "Johnson: Bham transit’s interim leader is now the CEO; get ready for more change," 20 June 2019 Using the traits of individuals to diagnose societies is intellectually treacherous enough; using them on an entire species is worse. Daniel Immerwahr, The New Republic, "All Over the Map," 11 June 2019 There’s obviously cause for great alarm in the culture war, which has unquestionably entered a new, more treacherous phase. Rich Lowry, National Review, "The Post-Liberal Dead End," 7 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'treacherous.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of treacherous

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

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Dictionary Entries near treacherous

trazodone

t-r box

trc

treacherous

treachery

treacle

treacle mold

Statistics for treacherous

Last Updated

11 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for treacherous

The first known use of treacherous was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for treacherous

treacherous

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of treacherous

: not able to be trusted : showing that someone cannot be trusted
: very dangerous and difficult to deal with

treacherous

adjective
treach·​er·​ous | \ ˈtre-chə-rəs How to pronounce treacherous (audio) \

Kids Definition of treacherous

1 : not safe because of hidden dangers This was a treacherous road at night …— John Reynolds Gardiner, Stone Fox
2 : not trustworthy : guilty of betrayal or likely to betray a treacherous enemy

Other Words from treacherous

treacherously adverb

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Comments on treacherous

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