torch

noun, often attributive
\ˈtȯrch \

Definition of torch 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a burning stick of resinous wood or twist of tow used to give light and usually carried in the hand : flambeau

2 : something (such as tradition, wisdom, or knowledge) likened to a torch as giving light or guidance pass the torch to the next generation

3 : any of various portable devices for emitting an unusually hot flame — compare blowtorch

4 chiefly British : flashlight sense 1

torch

verb
torched; torching; torches

Definition of torch (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to set fire to with or as if with a torch

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Synonyms & Antonyms for torch

Synonyms: Verb

burn, enkindle, fire, ignite, inflame (also enflame), kindle, light

Antonyms: Verb

douse (also dowse), extinguish, put out, quench, snuff (out)

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Examples of torch in a Sentence

Noun

in an insurance scam, the slumlord hired a torch to burn the tenement down

Verb

An arsonist torched the building. police suspect that the owner torched the house for the insurance money
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The quadrennial passing of the torch has begun for the third time, this time with Miami Heat coach Erik Spoelstra on the sidelines. Ira Winderman, Sun-Sentinel.com, "From Spoelstra to Lue to Walton: Life with LeBron becomes an oral history," 9 July 2018 Vince Villanueva walks nonchalantly through the crowded floor of the Schaumburg Convention Center while holding what seems to be (to the untrained eye) a raggedy old shoe above his head like the Statue of Liberty’s torch. Chris Lamorte, chicagotribune.com, "$9,000 Nikes and more: Schaumburg Sneaker Con a paradise for 'Sneakerheads'," 13 June 2018 In a signature galaxy far, far away passing of the torch, the note also featured a picture of what appeared to be Rey’s hand holding out a lightsaber to Iron Man. Megan Mccluskey, Time, "Star Wars Passes the Box Office Lightsaber to Avengers: Infinity War," 1 May 2018 Rashaan Evans and Harold Landry could herald the passing of the torch in the linebacking corps. Nate Davis, USA TODAY, "NFL draft grades 2018: Which teams had best, worst classes?," 28 Apr. 2018 Far From the Podium The ceremony also incorporated a passing of the torch to Beijing, which will host the 2022 Winter Games, before the Olympic cauldron was extinguished. Jason Duaine Hahn, PEOPLE.com, "A Korean Party! The Olympic Closing Ceremony Caps Off an Exhilarating Games," 25 Feb. 2018 His guidance will be crucial in helping the Spurs navigate a complicated passing of the torch. Jeff Mcdonald, San Antonio Express-News, "Changing of the point guards: How Dejounte Murray was built to succeed a legend," 21 Feb. 2018 Toast the meringue with a torch or under the broiler for a few seconds until the surface is lightly golden brown. Woman's Day Kitchen, Woman's Day, "S'mores Ice Cream Pie," 9 May 2016 Throughout the hotel, there are more than 2,000 Lego models, made from more than 3 million bricks, from flickering wall torches and sleeping mice to wizard staffs and butterflies. Degen Pener, The Hollywood Reporter, "Inside Legoland's New Castle-Themed Hotel," 28 Apr. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Yes, the same guy who was torched for six runs and 10 baserunners in 2 2/3 innings when the Yankees last saw him Saturday, but could be a stabilizing force down the stretch. Bob Nightengale, USA TODAY, "Yankees' pitching needs mean Manny Machado must wait 'til winter for his pinstripes," 11 July 2018 Lance Lynn, at White Sox (FD: $8,000, DK: $7,300) Lynn was torched in his first five starts with the Twins, allowing 22 earned runs in 23 2/3 innings. Mike Barner, SI.com, "MLB DFS Plays for June 26," 26 June 2018 There’s an African-American church in Indiana that persevered despite being torched again. Randy Dotinga, The Christian Science Monitor, "'The Bone and Sinew of the Land' restores a lost chapter of US history," 25 June 2018 In some areas, cars were torched outside police stations. James Hookway, WSJ, "Vietnam Tightens Grip on Internet With Data-Storage Law," 12 June 2018 In March, one person in the province was killed and homes were torched, the news agency said. Joe Sterling, CNN, "US Embassy warns of 'imminent attacks' in Mozambique," 9 June 2018 The Bucks couldn't get anything going offensively, were torched by the Nets' three-pointers — open and contested alike — and trailed by as many as 11 with seven minutes left in the third quarter. Matt Velazquez, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Nets 119, Bucks 111: A step in the wrong direction," 5 Apr. 2018 More than 1,000 stores and businesses were torched, damaged, looted or destroyed. Jean Marbella, baltimoresun.com, "The fire both times: Baltimore riots after Martin Luther King's death 50 years ago left scars that remain," 28 Mar. 2018 Trump had taken an aggressive tone during the summit, questioning the value of an alliance that has defined decades of American foreign policy, torching an ally, and proposing a massive increase in European defense spending. Jonathan Lemire And Jill Colvin, The Christian Science Monitor, "Trump claims NATO allies will up spending," 12 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'torch.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of torch

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1901, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for torch

Noun

Middle English torche, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *torca, alteration of Latin torqua something twisted, collar of twisted metal, alteration of torques; akin to Latin torquēre to twist — more at torture entry 1

Noun

toxoplasma, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus

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Learn More about torch

Phrases Related to torch

pass the torch (on)

Statistics for torch

Last Updated

9 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for torch

The first known use of torch was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for torch

torch

noun

English Language Learners Definition of torch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a long stick with material at one end that burns brightly

torch

verb

English Language Learners Definition of torch (Entry 2 of 2)

: to set fire to (something, such as a building) deliberately : to cause (something) to burn

torch

noun
\ˈtȯrch \

Kids Definition of torch

1 : a flaming light that is made of something which burns brightly and that is usually carried in the hand

2 : something that gives light or guidance She passed the torch of family traditions to her children.

3 : a portable device for producing a hot flame a welder's torch

TORCH

noun
\ˈtȯrch \

Medical Definition of TORCH 

: a group of pathological agents that cause similar symptoms in newborns and that include especially a toxoplasma (Toxoplasma gonii), cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, and the togavirus causing German measles

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Comments on torch

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