tenure

noun
ten·​ure | \ ˈten-yər also -ˌyu̇r How to pronounce tenure (audio) \

Definition of tenure

1 : the act, right, manner, or term of holding something (such as a landed property, a position, or an office) especially : a status granted after a trial period to a teacher that gives protection from summary dismissal
2 : grasp, hold

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Other Words from tenure

tenurable \ ˈten-​yər-​ə-​bəl How to pronounce tenurable (audio) \ adjective
tenurial \ te-​ˈnyu̇r-​ē-​əl How to pronounce tenurial (audio) \ adjective
tenurially \ te-​ˈnyu̇r-​ē-​ə-​lē How to pronounce tenurially (audio) \ adverb

Synonyms for tenure

Synonyms

hitch, stint, term, tour

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Examples of tenure in a Sentence

… but there is also about it just the trace of the nettlesome righteousness that alienated much of Washington during his tenure there, the not-so-subtle suggestion that while he might be in politics, he is not of politics and certainly not, God_forbid, a politician. — Jim Wooten, New York Times Magazine, 29 Jan. 1995 Pittsburgh's offensive linemen, trap blockers during Noll's tenure, had to bulk up for the straight-ahead game. — Paul Zimmerman, Sports Illustrated, 9 Nov. 1992 A mural on the upper half of a four-story guesthouse was painted in 1977 by twelve-year-old schoolchildren, whose tenure on the scaffold must have thrilled their parents. — John McPhee, New Yorker, 22 Feb. 1988 During his tenure as head coach, the team won the championship twice. her 12-year tenure with the company His tenure in office will end with the next election. After seven years I was finally granted tenure. He hopes to get tenure next year. The defendant did not have tenure on the land. land tenure in Anglo-Saxon Britain
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Recent Examples on the Web

Alas, his tenure as confirmed Oscar host did not last long… December 7 Kevin Hart steps down as host. Emma Dibdin, Harper's BAZAAR, "Kevin Hart, the "Popular" Film & Cancelled Categories: A Complete Timeline of the 2019 Oscar Drama," 21 Feb. 2019 But Systrom and Krieger stayed longer than many would have guessed, and remained influential throughout their tenure. Kurt Wagner, Recode, "Instagram’s co-founders, Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger, are leaving amid frustrations with parent company Facebook," 25 Sep. 2018 In his 18-month tenure at the EPA, Pruitt, who resigned last month, made a practice of deregulating materials and practices which had been previously deemed hazardous by the federal government due to health concerns. Alissa Walker, Curbed, "AIA says EPA should impose a ‘blanket ban’ on asbestos," 9 Aug. 2018 The Blackhawk has been in continuous service since the early 1980s, and although it's had a successful tenure, the Army decided now is the time for something new. Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, "First Flight of the SB-1 Defiant, a Potential Blackhawk Helicopter Replacement," 26 Mar. 2019 Further, this reform would maintain judicial independence, but instill regularity to the nominations process, discourage Justices from choosing a retirement date based on politics, and will stop the ever-increasing tenure of Justices. Ezra Klein, Vox, "Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the case for 18-year Supreme Court terms," 26 Dec. 2018 That pattern of consensus spans nearly 100 years, an institutional timeline far longer than the tenure of even the longest-serving justices. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "Study: Magnetism model reveals long-term non-partisan nature of SCOTUS," 12 Oct. 2018 In 2011, Long led a Razorback Athletic Facilities Master Plan that set out to raise $320 million in facility renovations over a 30-year tenure. Jesse Newell And Gary Bedore, kansascity, "KU hires Jeff Long as new football-savvy, fundraising-friendly athletic director," 5 July 2018 The file includes letters from high-ranking university officials congratulating the doctor for various appointments and tenure. CBS News, "Ohio State doctor who killed himself accused of decades-long sexual misconduct," 6 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'tenure.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of tenure

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for tenure

Middle English, "possession of land under obligation to a superior, the land so held," borrowed from Anglo-French tenure, teneure, going back to Gallo-Romance *tenitūra "act of possessing," from Latin ten-, base of tenēre "to hold, possess" + -it-, generalized from past participles ending in -itus + -ūra -ure — more at tenant entry 1

Note: A number of renderings of the word in Medieval Latin from the 11th century on (as tenetura, tenatura, tentura, tenura, etc.) may reflect stages in the passage from Latin to French or attempts to Latinize a vernacular form.

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Statistics for tenure

Last Updated

28 Apr 2019

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Time Traveler for tenure

The first known use of tenure was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for tenure

tenure

noun

English Language Learners Definition of tenure

: the amount of time that a person holds a job, office, or title
: the right to keep a job (especially the job of being a professor at a college or university) for as long as you want to have it
law : the right to use property

tenure

noun
ten·​ure | \ ˈten-yər How to pronounce tenure (audio) \

Legal Definition of tenure

1 : the act, manner, duration, or right of holding something tenure of office specifically : the manner of holding real property : the title and conditions by which property is held freehold tenure
2 : a status granted to a teacher usually after a probationary period that protects him or her from dismissal except for reasons of incompetence, gross misconduct, or financial necessity

Other Words from tenure

tenurial \ te-​ˈnyu̇r-​ē-​əl How to pronounce tenurial (audio) \ adjective
tenurially \ -​ə-​lē How to pronounce tenurially (audio) \ adverb

History and Etymology for tenure

Anglo-French, feudal holding, from Old French teneüre, from Medieval Latin tenitura, ultimately from Latin tenēre to hold

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More from Merriam-Webster on tenure

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with tenure

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for tenure

Spanish Central: Translation of tenure

Nglish: Translation of tenure for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of tenure for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about tenure

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