syndicate

noun
syn·​di·​cate | \ˈsin-di-kət \

Definition of syndicate 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a council or body of syndics

b : the office or jurisdiction of a syndic

2 : an association of persons officially authorized to undertake a duty or negotiate business

3a : a group of persons or concerns who combine to carry out a particular transaction or project

b : cartel sense 2

c : a loose association of racketeers in control of organized crime

4 : a business concern that sells materials for publication in a number of newspapers or periodicals simultaneously

5 : a group of newspapers under one management

syndicate

verb
syn·​di·​cate | \ˈsin-də-ˌkāt \
syndicated; syndicating

Definition of syndicate (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to subject to or manage as a syndicate

2a : to sell (something, such as a cartoon) to a syndicate or for publication in many newspapers or periodicals at once also : to sell the work of (someone, such as a writer) in this way a syndicated columnist

b : to sell (something, such as a series of television programs) directly to local stations

intransitive verb

: to unite to form a syndicate

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Other Words from syndicate

Verb

syndicator \ ˈsin-​də-​ˌkā-​tər \ noun

Synonyms for syndicate

Synonyms: Noun

cabal, conspiracy, crew, gang, Mafia, mob, ring

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Examples of syndicate in a Sentence

Noun

A syndicate owns the company. a powerful banking syndicate that controls loans in the small country

Verb

The company syndicates her work. The company syndicated the show to local stations.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

His character, Liam, is released from Irish prison, tries to set up a new life, but comes up against his former boss Clifford Cullen (Timothy Spall), head of a local crime syndicate. Bryan Alexander, USA TODAY, "Why 'Adrift' heartthrob Sam Claflin looks so fierce: 'It's the side of me no one has seen'," 31 May 2018 Jong-Fast, whose calling increasingly seems to be magisterially subtweeting the Trump syndicate, has been blocked by everyone she so much as gestures at. Jason Pontin, WIRED, "Donald Trump and the Golden Age of Subtweeting," 4 May 2018 Horse racing is the tip of the iceberg that is horse breeding, where partnerships and syndicates are becoming more common, according to CBS Sports. Christina Capatides, CBS News, "Justify becomes most valuable racehorse ever with $75M breeding deal," 12 June 2018 As migrants increasingly sought to travel from the western Balkans to European Union countries — with their open borders and economic promise — crime syndicates in each country worked in coordination. Marc Santora, New York Times, "They Let 71 People Die in a Stifling Truck. They Got 25 Years.," 14 June 2018 When you’ve been dumped by your crime syndicate and abandoned in the desert, there’s only one thing for a good former criminal mastermind to hope for. Graeme Mcmillan, The Hollywood Reporter, "AfterShock to Launch Supervillain Comic 'Patience! Conviction! Revenge!'," 19 June 2018 One of his syndicates, the Los Angeles Suburban Homes Company, purchased the 47,500-acre Van Nuys ranch for $2.5 million. Joe Mozingo, latimes.com, "Visionaries and scoundrels made the Los Angeles Times, which returns to local ownership after 18 years," 17 June 2018 Judging by the events of Solo, Crimson Dawn is apparently one of the syndicates under the Shadow Collective umbrella—a revelation that seems to indicate that Maul will have a major part to play in any future Solo spinoffs. Megan Mccluskey, Time, "There's a Surprise Cameo in Solo. Here's What It Means for Future Star Wars Spinoffs," 25 May 2018 When the high-tech skyscraper comes under attack by a criminal syndicate, Sawyer must save his family before a raging fire consumes the entire building. Josh Rottenberg, latimes.com, "Dwayne Johnson and Rawson Marshall Thurber on 'Skyscraper' and the state of Hollywood," 5 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The series, starring Alison Brie and Betty Gilpin, focuses around the creation of the Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling, the 1980s syndicated women's professional wrestling circuit. Mike Bloom, The Hollywood Reporter, "'GLOW' Stars Wrestle With Inclusion and Satire Through Stereotypes," 5 July 2018 At one point, The Ed Schultz Show was syndicated to nearly 100 affiliates, and in 2008 he was ranked No. Rob Tornoe, Philly.com, "Ed Schultz, former MSNBC host and outspoken radio personality, has died," 5 July 2018 And joining me now with reaction is the host of Michelle Malkin investigates on CR TV, syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin, and Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi. Fox News, "Kellyanne Conway responds to Democrats' calls to abolish ICE," 3 July 2018 The topics include A Glimpse at the Federal Census presented by Dorothy Miller, retired professor at CSU Northridge, and America Can’t Decide About Immigration presented by Ruben Navarrette, syndicated columnist. Linda Mcintosh, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Statewide poster contest winners picked... community news," 29 June 2018 Eventually, his words became syndicated, appearing in 400 publications worldwide. Christal Hayes, USA TODAY, "Charles Krauthammer, influential conservative commentator, dies at 68 after battle with cancer," 21 June 2018 The horse was bought for $17,500, and was syndicated for a record $12 million, retiring from racing in 1978. Morning Brief, The Seattle Times, "Monday Morning Brief, June 11: Summit with North Korea, who Seattle’s newcomers are," 11 June 2018 The stories were syndicated in more than 100 newspapers and collected in books. Jeff Suess, Cincinnati.com, "Our history: Fair and square 'Seckatary Hawkins' turns 100," 6 June 2018 On April 9, after 30 years as a radio host — and 22 years of hosting the Morning Show (which is syndicated in 80 markets) — Duran was inducted into the National Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame, joining some of his own personal heroes. Gillian Telling, PEOPLE.com, "Elvis Duran Is Inducted into the National Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame," 24 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'syndicate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of syndicate

Noun

1624, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1882, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for syndicate

Noun

French syndicat, from syndic

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Statistics for syndicate

Last Updated

27 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for syndicate

The first known use of syndicate was in 1624

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More Definitions for syndicate

syndicate

noun

Financial Definition of syndicate

What It Is

A syndicate is a group of lenders or underwriters that come together to share or participate in a specific loan or investment.

How It Works

A project may require too large of financial investment for a single lender or require a special type of investor or lender with expertise in a particular asset class. For example, a transportation project, such as a high speed rail, may involve a group of investors and lenders, each specializing in a portion of the project, such as rail lines, cars, bridges and tunnels, and signal and control technologies.  This whole group is referred to as a syndicate.

Not only do the various lenders or investors bring their own expertise to the project, they also spread the risk among themselves, especially among very large, complicated projects.  In addition, they enable lenders to handle projects that may exceed their individual capital base.

A banking syndicate, for example, is not a permanent entity.  It is formed solely for a specific project.

Why It Matters

A syndicate is formed by an investment banker who, understanding the complexity and scale of a project, helps bring together several lenders who can participate in the project. While each project is negotiated individually, investment bankers may rely on a small group of specialized lenders to participate in syndicates.

Source: Investing Answers

syndicate

noun

English Language Learners Definition of syndicate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a group of people or businesses that work together

: a group of people who are involved in organized crime

: a business that sells something (such as a piece of writing, comic strip, or photograph) to several different newspapers or magazines for publication at the same time : a business that syndicates something

syndicate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of syndicate (Entry 2 of 2)

: to sell (something, such as a piece of writing, comic strip, or photograph) to many different newspapers or magazines for publication at the same time

: to sell (a series of television or radio programs) to many different stations at the same time

syndicate

noun
syn·​di·​cate | \ˈsin-di-kət \

Legal Definition of syndicate 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a group organized to carry out a particular transaction or enterprise

2 : an association of organized criminals

syndicate

verb
syn·​di·​cate | \ˈsin-di-ˌkāt \
syndicated; syndicating

Legal Definition of syndicate (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to form or manage as or through a syndicate a syndicated tax shelter

intransitive verb

: to unite to form a syndicate

Other Words from syndicate

syndication \ ˌsin-​di-​ˈkā-​shən \ noun

History and Etymology for syndicate

Noun

French syndicat the office or jurisdiction of a syndic

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