stress

noun
\ ˈstres How to pronounce stress (audio) \

Definition of stress

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : constraining force or influence: such as
a : a force exerted when one body or body part presses on, pulls on, pushes against, or tends to compress or twist another body or body part especially : the intensity of this mutual force commonly expressed in pounds per square inch
b : the deformation caused in a body by such a force
c : a physical, chemical, or emotional factor that causes bodily or mental tension and may be a factor in disease causation
d : a state resulting from a stress especially : one of bodily or mental tension resulting from factors that tend to alter an existent equilibrium job-related stress
e : strain, pressure the environment is under stress to the point of collapse— Joseph Shoben
2 : emphasis, weight lay stress on a point
3 archaic : intense effort or exertion
4 : intensity of utterance given to a speech sound, syllable, or word producing relative loudness
5a : relative force or prominence of sound in verse
b : a syllable having relative force or prominence

stress

verb
stressed; stressing; stresses

Definition of stress (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to subject to physical or psychological stress stressing the equipment this traffic is stressing me out
2 : to subject to phonetic stress : accent
3 : to lay stress on : emphasize stressed the importance of teamwork

intransitive verb

: to feel stress stressing about the big exam often used with out

Synonyms for stress

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of stress in a Sentence

Noun She uses meditation as a way of reducing stress. Hormones are released into the body in response to emotional stress. She is dealing with the stresses of working full-time and going to school. He talked about the stresses and strains of owning a business. Carrying a heavy backpack around all day puts a lot of stress on your shoulders and back. To reduce the amount of stress on your back, bend your knees when you lift something heavy. The ship's mast snapped under the stress of high winds. measuring the effects of stresses on the material Verb The union stressed the need for stricter safety standards. The risks involved in the procedure should be stressed. Some people stress the second syllable of “harassment,” while others stress the first. When she said, “We need lots of money,” she stressed the word “lots.” It's not an important decision and it isn't worth stressing over. See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Whether employees have returned to the office or not, the stress of dealing with the upheaval of life during a pandemic while trying to keep a job is overwhelming and so many things on to-do lists never get done. Chandra Steele, PCMAG, 4 May 2022 While heat stress is a major concern, the warm weather is impacting overall athletic performance and there is a growing body of research highlighting the implications of heat on athletic performance. Jim Foerster, Forbes, 2 May 2022 But that data was based on 2020 food prices, so the stress felt by families is likely even higher now. Grace Segers, The New Republic, 25 Apr. 2022 In the most disadvantaged neighborhoods that are most challenging to navigate, stress makes that navigation even more difficult. Jens Ludwig, CNN, 23 Apr. 2022 This is a useful metric, helping measure stress or improve sleep tracking understanding, for instance. David Phelan, Forbes, 23 Apr. 2022 Nonmilitary support for Ukraine and developing-country debt stress were top topics for finance ministers and central bankers attending the meetings. Yuka Hayashi, WSJ, 23 Apr. 2022 Some factors that contribute to burnout include a lack of control, having unclear job expectations, being in a toxic environment, overexerting your energy, and experiencing constant stress. Carmela Chirinos, Fortune, 22 Apr. 2022 There's also another factor Willow needs to take into consideration: post-traumatic stress. Dave Quinn, PEOPLE.com, 22 Apr. 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The Fed will also need to stress patience to investors and consumers. Paul R. La Monica, CNN, 5 May 2022 And there’s no evidence any steps were taken to stress awareness of civilians in future use-of-force situations. Sam Stecklow, The Salt Lake Tribune, 25 Apr. 2022 Meanwhile, for now the NFT exists in tandem with a real piece of paper, a fact that Liliesleaf has been careful to stress. Ryan Lenora Brown, The Christian Science Monitor, 25 Apr. 2022 Your mom will never have to stress about dropping a vase again. Brittney Morgan And Medgina Saint-elien, House Beautiful, 20 Apr. 2022 Meetings add to stress when they are seen as interrupters of more important work. Jill Duffy, PCMAG, 18 Apr. 2022 Thankfully, the Secura Bread Maker will give you classic delicious loaves without having to stress over getting confused by bells and whistles. PEOPLE.com, 15 Apr. 2022 Western analysts are already hurrying to stress that the destruction of the Moskva does not mean that our warships are equally vulnerable to anti-ship missiles. David Hambling, Forbes, 14 Apr. 2022 In an Earth Day rally almost resembling a fair, people of all ages gathered at the Arizona Capitol on Saturday afternoon to stress the urgency of the climate crisis and push for equitable action at congressional and local levels. Zayna Syed, The Arizona Republic, 24 Apr. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stress.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of stress

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1545, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for stress

Noun

Middle English stresse stress, distress, short for destresse — more at distress

Learn More About stress

Time Traveler for stress

Time Traveler

The first known use of stress was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near stress

Stresemann

stress

stress accent

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Statistics for stress

Last Updated

8 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Stress.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/stress. Accessed 18 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for stress

stress

noun
\ ˈstres How to pronounce stress (audio) \

Kids Definition of stress

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a force that tends to change the shape of an object
2 : something that causes physical or emotional tension : a state of tension resulting from a stress She felt the stress of working two jobs.
3 : special importance given to something The speaker laid stress on a particular point.
4 : relative loudness or force of a part of a spoken word or a beat in music "Finally" has the stress on the first syllable.

stress

verb
stressed; stressing

Kids Definition of stress (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to subject to excessive use or to forces that cause a change in shape Hard use was stressing the equipment.
2 : to cause or experience physical or emotional tension All these changes are stressing me.
3 : to pronounce (part of a word) with relative loudness or force Stress the first syllable.
4 : to give special importance to : emphasize He stressed the need to save energy.

stress

noun
\ ˈstres How to pronounce stress (audio) \

Medical Definition of stress

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a force exerted when one body or body part presses on, pulls on, pushes against, or tends to compress or twist another body or body part especially : the intensity of this mutual force commonly expressed in pounds per square inch
b : the deformation caused in a body by such a force
2a : a physical, chemical, or emotional factor that causes bodily or mental tension and may be a factor in disease causation
b : a state of bodily or mental tension resulting from factors that tend to alter an existent equilibrium
3 : the force exerted between teeth of the upper and lower jaws during mastication

stress

transitive verb

Medical Definition of stress (Entry 2 of 2)

: to subject to stress a patient stressed by surgery

More from Merriam-Webster on stress

Nglish: Translation of stress for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of stress for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about stress

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