stampede

noun
stam·​pede | \ (ˌ)stam-ˈpēd How to pronounce stampede (audio) \

Definition of stampede

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a wild headlong rush or flight of frightened animals
2 : a mass movement of people at a common impulse
3 : an extended festival combining a rodeo with exhibitions, contests, and social events

stampede

verb
stampeded; stampeding

Definition of stampede (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to cause to run away in headlong panic
2 : to cause (a group or mass of people) to act on sudden or rash impulse

intransitive verb

1 : to flee headlong in panic
2 : to act on mass impulse

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Other Words from stampede

Verb

stampeder noun

Examples of stampede in a Sentence

Noun a stampede to the exits a stampede to buy the stock a stampede of new applicants Verb People stampeded to the exits. The gunshot stampeded the cattle.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Officers are sometimes ordered against escalating a situation by drawing their weapons if superiors believe doing so could lead to a stampede or a shootout. Colleen Long, Michael Balsamo And Lisa Mascaro, Chron, "Capitol police were overrun, 'left naked' against rioters," 10 Jan. 2021 Although the coronavirus pandemic complicated space operations around the globe in 2020, most high-priority missions remained on track, led by the U.S., China and the United Arab Emirates in a stampede to Mars in July. Marcia Dunn, orlandosentinel.com, "World’s space achievements a bright spot in stressful 2020," 16 Dec. 2020 There was no stampede when the doors opened at 5 a.m. Brandon Lingle, ExpressNews.com, "San Antonio’s Black Friday shoppers — fewer this year — endure rain, pandemic for deals," 27 Nov. 2020 However, in the auto market’s ensuing stampede toward SUVs and away from sedans, few seemed to notice. Dan Neil, WSJ, "2021 Genesis G80: The Finest Car $70,000 Can Buy," 9 Dec. 2020 If the stampede doesn’t swerve and doesn’t stop, there is always an out. Robert Ruark, Field & Stream, "F&S Classics: Suicide Made Easy," 1 Dec. 2020 The economic shutdown that ensued transformed the steady exodus to e-commerce into a stampede. Kate Gibson, CBS News, "Holiday jobs: Here are the retailers that are still hiring — and what they pay," 16 Oct. 2020 In March, the Fed acted for the second time in a dozen years to prop up money funds, which had experienced a destabilizing investor stampede at the height of the 2008 crisis. Andrew Ackerman, WSJ, "Global Regulators Highlight Need to Shore Up Money-Market Funds After March Turmoil," 16 Nov. 2020 The stampede of the affluent into grim-faced, highly competitive sports has been a tragicomedy of perverse incentives. Ruth S. Barrett, The Atlantic, "Rich Parents Went All In on Lacrosse. And Squash. And Water Polo.," 17 Oct. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Party members’ jobs, usually something like knight or warlock, are literally blue-collar jobs: the foreman of a construction company who wields an enormous war hammer and can summon a parade of workers to stampede the enemy. Wired Staff, Wired, "The Video Games WIRED Loved Most in 2020," 26 Dec. 2020 More than 70 animatronic dinosaurs and an 80-foot-long spinosaurus – all socially distanced and on their best behavior – will stampede into the massive parking lot outside the arena Dec. 4-20 for Jurassic Quest Drive-Thru. Phillip Valys, sun-sentinel.com, "Dinosaur tailgate party? 70 animatronic dinosaurs stampeding into BB&T Center parking lot," 27 Nov. 2020 There are rampaging Ohms, mountainous bugs that stampede across the desert like the sandworms in Dune. Ryu Spaeth, The New Republic, "Hayao Miyazaki’s Viral Stories," 19 Nov. 2020 The pandemic has prompted Americans to stampede online in record numbers. Matt Day, Bloomberg.com, "Amazon's Drugstore Isn't Revolutionizing Anything—for Now," 18 Nov. 2020 But the virus continued to stampede through Central Florida with new deaths and more cases reported on Monday. Ryan Gillespie, orlandosentinel.com, "Orange hotel tax collection inch up as virus continues to spread," 9 Nov. 2020 As the began stampeding across Maryland in recent weeks, scientists tucked away in a University of Maryland research lab in Baltimore got an idea about how to put their high-tech robots to use. Meredith Cohn, Washington Post, "With help of robots, Maryland medical school to vastly expand state’s testing for coronavirus — if swabs can be found," 19 Apr. 2020 As the coronavirus now stampedes across Britain and much of the world, Mr. Johnson is heeding the same principle, spurning the mass closures that have become commonplace across Europe and gambling his political future on a more restrained approach. Benjamin Mueller, New York Times, "As Europe Shuts Down, Britain Takes a Different, and Contentious, Approach," 13 Mar. 2020 Earlier this month, there was a rout when mutual funds had to sell municipal bonds to raise cash when herds of investors started stampeding to redeem their shares. New York Times, "Stock Markets in Asia Climb After U.S. Rally: Live Updates," 27 Mar. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stampede.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stampede

Noun

1828, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1838, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for stampede

Noun

American Spanish estampida, from Spanish, crash, from estampar to stamp, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German stampfōn to stamp

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Time Traveler for stampede

Time Traveler

The first known use of stampede was in 1828

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Statistics for stampede

Last Updated

16 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Stampede.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/stampede. Accessed 17 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for stampede

stampede

noun
How to pronounce stampede (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of stampede

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an occurrence in which a large group of frightened or excited animals or people run together in a wild and uncontrolled way to escape from something, get out of a place, etc.
: a situation in which a lot of people try to do the same thing at the same time

stampede

verb

English Language Learners Definition of stampede (Entry 2 of 2)

: to run away in a large group from something especially because of fear
: to cause (animals) to run away in a large group
: to cause (a person or a group of people) to do something suddenly and without proper thought

stampede

noun
stam·​pede | \ stam-ˈpēd How to pronounce stampede (audio) \

Kids Definition of stampede

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a wild rush or flight of frightened animals or people
2 : a sudden foolish action or movement of a large number of people

stampede

verb
stampeded; stampeding

Kids Definition of stampede (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to run or cause to run away in fright or panic People stampeded to the exits.
2 : to act or cause to act together suddenly and without thought

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Comments on stampede

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