stampede

noun
stam·​pede | \(ˌ)stam-ˈpēd \

Definition of stampede 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a wild headlong rush or flight of frightened animals

2 : a mass movement of people at a common impulse

3 : an extended festival combining a rodeo with exhibitions, contests, and social events

stampede

verb
stampeded; stampeding

Definition of stampede (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to cause to run away in headlong panic

2 : to cause (a group or mass of people) to act on sudden or rash impulse

intransitive verb

1 : to flee headlong in panic

2 : to act on mass impulse

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Other Words from stampede

Verb

stampeder noun

Examples of stampede in a Sentence

Noun

a stampede to the exits a stampede to buy the stock a stampede of new applicants

Verb

People stampeded to the exits. The gunshot stampeded the cattle.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

But in options markets, at least, there hasn’t been a stampede into benchmark protection. Gunjan Banerji, WSJ, "Panic in Stocks? Options Signal No," 31 Oct. 2018 Or when Black Friday stampedes give way to a holiday fracas. Sam Blum, Popular Mechanics, "Walmart Files Patent For Carts That Track Your Heart Rate," 10 Oct. 2018 During that time, my typical modes of distraction like Instagram, texting, and random Wikipedia deep dives—not to mention the unrelenting stampede of news—were anything but soothing. Liana Satenstein, Vogue, "How the Late ’90s Saved My Style," 20 July 2018 As long as Chinese investors can make money gambling on housing—and companies can make money building or selling them—weakness in the stock and bond markets may not be enough to trigger a full-scale stampede out of the yuan. Nathaniel Taplin, WSJ, "Has the Big Yuan Short Finally Arrived?," 26 June 2018 However, a stampede broke out on May 1 in the rush to apply, and the aid was halted for several days following the overwhelming demand. Suyin Haynes, Time, "Boracay Islanders Feel the Pinch After the Philippines Shuts Down a Top Tourist Destination," 16 May 2018 No one knows, but Judd Apatow deserves credit for cheerleading this stampede of public statements in Hollywood. Frank Rich, Daily Intelligencer, "The Shameless Fakery of Trump’s Retreat on Family Separations," 21 June 2018 At least six people who sustained gunshot wounds or were injured during the stampede, including two suspects, remained hospitalized Monday. Laura Mccrystal, Philly.com, "Gov. Murphy condemns Trenton arts festival shooting and vows to bring those responsible for 'the lawlessness' to justice," 18 June 2018 According to authorities, the tear-gas caused a stampede inside the building, where approximately 500 students were celebrating a pre-graduation party. De Elizabeth, Teen Vogue, "Tear-Gas Explosion Causes Stampede at Venezuela Nightclub," 17 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Realistically, the 60 million Americans currently earning less than $15 per hour (plus many retirees and longtime labor force dropouts) would also stampede into this program. Brian Riedl, Vox, "America might be ready for democratic socialism. It’s not ready for the bill.," 7 Aug. 2018 The subplots keep stampeding past before a viewer has a chance to corral them. Hank Stuever, chicagotribune.com, "A gruff Kevin Costner has a hard time corralling 'Yellowstone's' wild herd of subplots," 14 June 2018 The victims, eight of whom were younger than 18, suffered either asphyxia or trauma to the body as hundreds of clubgoers stampeded to escape the fumes. Rachelle Krygier, Washington Post, "Tear gas triggers stampede at Venezuela nightclub, resulting in 17 deaths," 16 June 2018 Claire and Owen, but also military vet Zia (Daniella Pineda) and computer nerd Franklin (Justice Smith)—running away from cool-looking explosions while enormous dinosaurs stampede all around them. Josephine Livingstone, The New Republic, "We’re Going to Need a Bigger Island," 22 June 2018 The victims, eight of whom were younger than 18, suffered either asphyxia or trauma to the body as hundreds of clubgoers stampeded to escape the fumes. Nicole Winfield, BostonGlobe.com, "Pope: Abortion is ‘white glove’ equivalent to Nazi crimes," 17 June 2018 And while polls show mixed evidence of a Democratic turnout advantage in November, in practice, party voters have stampeded to the polls in the actual elections held since Trump took office. Ronald Brownstein, CNN, "Beating Republicans in November will be harder than Democrats thought," 22 May 2018 Whether stampeding drunk through St. Mark’s Square at midnight or scaring off the monkeys in the Amazon, out-of-control vacationers are wreaking havoc everywhere. Joe Queenan, WSJ, "Skip the Selfie and Run: Busy Locales Get Tough With Tourists," 31 May 2018 Noisy approaches by people can startle herds, sending walruses stampeding into water, which can crush and kill vulnerable animals. Washington Post, "Walrus surprise residents in remote Alaska village," 9 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stampede.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stampede

Noun

1828, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1838, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for stampede

Noun

American Spanish estampida, from Spanish, crash, from estampar to stamp, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German stampfōn to stamp

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Statistics for stampede

Last Updated

14 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for stampede

The first known use of stampede was in 1828

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More Definitions for stampede

stampede

noun

English Language Learners Definition of stampede

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an occurrence in which a large group of frightened or excited animals or people run together in a wild and uncontrolled way to escape from something, get out of a place, etc.

: a situation in which a lot of people try to do the same thing at the same time

stampede

verb

English Language Learners Definition of stampede (Entry 2 of 2)

: to run away in a large group from something especially because of fear

: to cause (animals) to run away in a large group

: to cause (a person or a group of people) to do something suddenly and without proper thought

stampede

noun
stam·​pede | \stam-ˈpēd \

Kids Definition of stampede

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a wild rush or flight of frightened animals or people

2 : a sudden foolish action or movement of a large number of people

stampede

verb
stampeded; stampeding

Kids Definition of stampede (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to run or cause to run away in fright or panic People stampeded to the exits.

2 : to act or cause to act together suddenly and without thought

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