squabble

noun
squab·​ble | \ ˈskwä-bəl How to pronounce squabble (audio) \

Definition of squabble

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a noisy altercation or quarrel usually over petty matters

squabble

verb
squabbled; squabbling\ ˈskwä-​b(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce squabbling (audio) \

Definition of squabble (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to quarrel noisily and usually over petty matters

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Other Words from squabble

Verb

squabbler \ ˈskwä-​b(ə-​)lər How to pronounce squabbler (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for squabble

Noun

quarrel, wrangle, altercation, squabble mean a noisy dispute usually marked by anger. quarrel implies heated verbal contention, stressing strained or severed relations which may persist beyond the contention. a quarrel nearly destroyed the relationship wrangle suggests undignified and often futile disputation with a noisy insistence on differing opinions. wrangle interminably about small issues altercation implies fighting with words as the chief weapon, although it may also connote blows. a loud public altercation squabble stresses childish and unseemly dispute over petty matters, but it need not imply bitterness or anger. a brief squabble over what to do next

Examples of squabble in a Sentence

Noun frightened by noise of the squabble, the cat hid under the couch Verb The children were squabbling over the toys. the children squabbled loudly over who got to play with the toy first
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Newsom’s squabble with local authorities quickly spiraled into a more heated debate over the governor’s use of his executive powers to protect public health. Los Angeles Times, "Newsom teases announcement in ‘days, not weeks’ on reopening California," 1 May 2020 While there’s potential for more squabbles at home, there’s also an opportunity to meet challenges your household is facing as a team. Anna Goldfarb, New York Times, "Roommates or Partner Getting on Your Nerves? Read This," 16 Apr. 2020 There’s the increasingly explosive war between Mia Warren (Kerry Washington) and Elena Richardson (Reese Witherspoon), the mystery of Mia’s past, and multiple high school squabbles. Ariana Romero, refinery29.com, "Little Fires Everywhere Made A Huge Change To Its Most Important Sex Scene," 25 Mar. 2020 But even aside from its scientific history, the strategy is better known as a game used by children around the world to settle playground squabbles. Quanta Magazine, "Biodiversity May Thrive Through Games of Rock-Paper-Scissors," 5 Mar. 2020 In multi-dog homes, a crate for each dog is recommended to prevent food squabbles or to protect dogs that must require prescription diets. Iris Katz, baltimoresun.com/maryland/carroll, "Pet Wise: Many factors to consider when thinking about adding a new pet," 16 Nov. 2019 Longstanding squabble Bridenstine’s comments are unlikely to settle the debate, which started in the 1990s with the discovery of the Kuiper belt, a ring of rocky or icy objects circling the sun beyond Neptune's orbit. NBC News, "Is Pluto a planet or a dwarf planet? NASA chief picks sides in emotional debate," 29 Aug. 2019 Rice also set an unofficial franchise record for contract squabbles. azcentral, "Arizona Cardinals' Top 100 players of all-time," 14 Aug. 2019 The squabble conjures memories of the 1990s, when warlords who are still on the political stage fought for power. The Economist, "Two different people are sworn in as president of Afghanistan," 12 Mar. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb His government’s plan for another 55 billion euros ($60 billion) of spending to keep companies and families afloat also seemed to take an age to get approved by a squabbling cabinet. John Follain, Bloomberg.com, "Conte's Chameleon Act Gives Him Staying Power in Italian Crisis," 19 May 2020 Stimulus package not set in stone Lawmakers in D.C. continued to squabble over a stimulus package aimed at saving an economy in free fall. Sarah Brookbank, Cincinnati.com, "Coronavirus in Ohio, Kentucky: Stay-at-home order, nonessential businesses, what stores are open, Rand Paul, stimulus," 23 Mar. 2020 The other residents include Mr. and Mrs. Burke (Marc Kudisch and Luba Mason), a squabbling couple of ambiguous provenance, and their son, Elias (Todd Almond), a grown-up with the mind of a child. Ben Brantley, New York Times, "‘Girl From the North Country’ Review: Bob Dylan’s Amazing Grace," 5 Mar. 2020 In the early days of the crisis, several European nations squabbled with their neighbors and accused them of withholding vital medical exports. NBC News, "British doctors warn some Chinese ventilators could kill if used in hospitals," 30 Apr. 2020 Officials with knowledge of the preparations said that while agreement is growing around the perimeter of a economic recovery plan, squabbling over the details will probably be the dominant feature. Ian Wishart, Fortune, "Divided Europe can’t decide how to save itself as it meets to design $2 trillion coronavirus recovery plan," 23 Apr. 2020 The two camps have previously squabbled over the National Security Council's focus on pandemics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's funding. Naomi Lim, Washington Examiner, "Trump and Biden campaigns slug it out over coronavirus in fall fight preview," 21 Mar. 2020 The Pope & Young Club world-record brown bear—shown here squabbling with a bald eagle that has stolen his breakfast—was arrowed in 2018 by the owner of Brush Country Studios, Chris Cammack. Ralph P. Stuart, Outdoor Life, "13 Amazing Animal Mounts," 6 Mar. 2020 Congress, being Congress, squabbled about the particulars of the massive federal relief package that everyone agreed was needed. Pradheep J. Shanker, National Review, "Sympathy and Empathy in the Time of Coronavirus," 8 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'squabble.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of squabble

Noun

1602, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1604, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for squabble

Noun

probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Swedish dialect skvabbel dispute

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Time Traveler for squabble

Time Traveler

The first known use of squabble was in 1602

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Statistics for squabble

Last Updated

12 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Squabble.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/squabble. Accessed 1 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for squabble

squabble

verb

English Language Learners Definition of squabble

: to argue loudly about things that are not important

squabble

noun
squab·​ble | \ ˈskwä-bəl How to pronounce squabble (audio) \

Kids Definition of squabble

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a noisy quarrel usually over something unimportant

squabble

verb
squabbled; squabbling

Kids Definition of squabble (Entry 2 of 2)

: to quarrel noisily for little or no reason

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Comments on squabble

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