squabble

noun
squab·​ble | \ ˈskwä-bəl How to pronounce squabble (audio) \

Definition of squabble

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a noisy altercation or quarrel usually over petty matters

squabble

verb
squabbled; squabbling\ ˈskwä-​b(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce squabble (audio) \

Definition of squabble (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to quarrel noisily and usually over petty matters

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Other Words from squabble

Verb

squabbler \ ˈskwä-​b(ə-​)lər How to pronounce squabble (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for squabble

Noun

quarrel, wrangle, altercation, squabble mean a noisy dispute usually marked by anger. quarrel implies heated verbal contention, stressing strained or severed relations which may persist beyond the contention. a quarrel nearly destroyed the relationship wrangle suggests undignified and often futile disputation with a noisy insistence on differing opinions. wrangle interminably about small issues altercation implies fighting with words as the chief weapon, although it may also connote blows. a loud public altercation squabble stresses childish and unseemly dispute over petty matters, but it need not imply bitterness or anger. a brief squabble over what to do next

Examples of squabble in a Sentence

Noun frightened by noise of the squabble, the cat hid under the couch Verb The children were squabbling over the toys. the children squabbled loudly over who got to play with the toy first
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Nevertheless, the squabble between both companies dominated a juicy New York Times piece on Monday laying out the backstory between Cook and Zuckerberg. Andy Meek, BGR, "Here’s why some Facebook employees are calling Tim Cook a hypocrite," 27 Apr. 2021 The Pulitzer — and the ensuing squabble — changed his life. Washington Post, "Wayne Peterson, Pulitzer Prize-winning composer, dies at 93," 18 Apr. 2021 Seven came from Sexton, who was clearly angered by that first-half squabble and clapped enthusiastically after each bucket. Chris Fedor, cleveland, "Collin Sexton scuffles with Toronto Raptors, then adds to their misery in Cavaliers’ 116-105 win," 21 Mar. 2021 What began as a schoolyard squabble is now a full-fledged fistfight. Steven P. Dinkin, San Diego Union-Tribune, "In the fight between parents and teachers, it’s students who lose," 7 Mar. 2021 Saturday at the Erwin Center, an on-court squabble between Longhorns turned ugly. Nick Moyle, San Antonio Express-News, "BKC Texas-Kansas Advance 2-23," 22 Feb. 2021 What divided them was Trump’s claim to have won the election, but that squabble is over. Fred Barnes, Washington Examiner, "Trump's loss is the GOP's gain," 14 Jan. 2021 One squabble at a news conference in 2018 resulted in Trump and his aides revoking Acosta's White House press pass, which was later reinstated after a court ruled in CNN's favor in legal dispute. Jazmin Goodwin, CNN, "Jim Acosta: I'm not the only White House reporter who got death threats," 27 Dec. 2020 And, of course, there was the brief squabble over the poop emoji wristbands handed out Tuesday by the Wisconsin Center to denote that those who entered the building were fever-free. Alison Dirr, USA TODAY, "Milwaukee County presidential recount wraps up with Biden adding to his margin over Trump," 28 Nov. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Tensions during the hours-long markup remained high as lawmakers would tangentially squabble over unrelated issues, namely reports on the potential expansion of the Supreme Court. ABC News, "House committee advances reparations bill: 'We're giving America the opportunity for redemption'," 15 Apr. 2021 Don’t squabble with your siblings over who gets my monthly ten-cent payments from Medium. Danielle Kraese, The New Yorker, "Advice My Parents Gave Me Versus Advice I Will Give My Kids," 22 Feb. 2021 Politicos will squabble over the details, debating which side ceded more and which gained in the negotiations. NBC News, "The U.K.-E.U. trade deal might mean the British can stop talking about Brexit," 24 Dec. 2020 Often, spectators catch a confluence of ravens and magpies that swoop in to squabble for the same fish. Jenna Kunze, Smithsonian Magazine, "Behold America’s Largest Congregation of Bald Eagles," 3 Nov. 2020 Economists always squabble over how precisely to measure the jobless rate. Bernhard Warner, Fortune, "Dollar up, stocks down as curfews, COVID and underwhelming corporate results spook investors," 15 Oct. 2020 Even now, humanitarian rescue boats in the Mediterranean are often stuck for days or weeks as countries squabble over whether to accept the boat at port — and what to do with the migrants who arrive. Washington Post, "E.U. proposes immigration deal that would require countries to take a share of asylum-seekers or assist in deportations," 23 Sep. 2020 While the Bowlen children squabble like spoiled brats about the fate of a $3 billion business their late father built, unemployed Coloradans worry coronavirus might kill any hope of finding a job. Mark Kiszla, The Denver Post, "Kiszla: In America’s 2020, Kareem Jackson knows a real hero can no longer just stick to sports — and neither can we," 2 June 2020 When food is available in small areas, the brighter birds are more likely to squabble and push other members of the flock around. Fox News, "Nasty in pink: Flamingos with brighter feathers are more aggressive than others, study says," 11 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'squabble.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of squabble

Noun

1602, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1604, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for squabble

Noun

probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Swedish dialect skvabbel dispute

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Time Traveler for squabble

Time Traveler

The first known use of squabble was in 1602

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Statistics for squabble

Last Updated

3 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Squabble.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/squabble. Accessed 13 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for squabble

squabble

verb

English Language Learners Definition of squabble

: to argue loudly about things that are not important

squabble

noun
squab·​ble | \ ˈskwä-bəl How to pronounce squabble (audio) \

Kids Definition of squabble

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a noisy quarrel usually over something unimportant

squabble

verb
squabbled; squabbling

Kids Definition of squabble (Entry 2 of 2)

: to quarrel noisily for little or no reason

Comments on squabble

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