squabble

noun
squab·​ble | \ ˈskwä-bəl How to pronounce squabble (audio) \

Definition of squabble

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a noisy altercation or quarrel usually over petty matters

squabble

verb
squabbled; squabbling\ ˈskwä-​b(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce squabble (audio) \

Definition of squabble (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to quarrel noisily and usually over petty matters

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Other Words from squabble

Verb

squabbler \ ˈskwä-​b(ə-​)lər How to pronounce squabble (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for squabble

Noun

quarrel, wrangle, altercation, squabble mean a noisy dispute usually marked by anger. quarrel implies heated verbal contention, stressing strained or severed relations which may persist beyond the contention. a quarrel nearly destroyed the relationship wrangle suggests undignified and often futile disputation with a noisy insistence on differing opinions. wrangle interminably about small issues altercation implies fighting with words as the chief weapon, although it may also connote blows. a loud public altercation squabble stresses childish and unseemly dispute over petty matters, but it need not imply bitterness or anger. a brief squabble over what to do next

Examples of squabble in a Sentence

Noun frightened by noise of the squabble, the cat hid under the couch Verb The children were squabbling over the toys. the children squabbled loudly over who got to play with the toy first
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In Lucifer's midseason finale, the eternally God (Dennis Haysbert) descended from Heaven to break up the familial squabble between Lucifer (Tom Ellis), Amenadiel (DB Woodside), and their manipulative brother Michael (also Ellis). Ew Staff, EW.com, 28 May 2021 However, if the public squabble becomes a full-fledged divorce, the Packers will no longer be the controlling force in the division. Steve Silverman, Forbes, 19 May 2021 This conflict is far more than a political squabble. Star Tribune, 11 May 2021 But a number of Senate Republicans downplayed the squabble as simply an inside-the-Beltway dispute that most voters are ignoring. Jamie Gangel, Michael Warren And Manu Raju, CNN, 11 May 2021 The move was made after a bitter public squabble among central committee members of the state party. New York Times, 7 May 2021 The school reinstated InterVarsity's charter in 2018 after an internal squabble. Nicholas Rowan, Washington Examiner, 6 Apr. 2021 Nevertheless, the squabble between both companies dominated a juicy New York Times piece on Monday laying out the backstory between Cook and Zuckerberg. Andy Meek, BGR, 27 Apr. 2021 The Pulitzer — and the ensuing squabble — changed his life. Washington Post, 18 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb As the extreme drought causes various agencies to squabble over dwindling water supplies, conservationists say the state is still not doing enough to prevent an endangered run of salmon from dying in the Sacramento River. Tara Duggan, San Francisco Chronicle, 30 May 2021 It’s given both teams a place to monitor the development of their most prized prospects without having to squabble over their playing time with the Crunch. Laine Higgins, WSJ, 11 May 2021 Tensions during the hours-long markup remained high as lawmakers would tangentially squabble over unrelated issues, namely reports on the potential expansion of the Supreme Court. ABC News, 15 Apr. 2021 Don’t squabble with your siblings over who gets my monthly ten-cent payments from Medium. Danielle Kraese, The New Yorker, 22 Feb. 2021 Politicos will squabble over the details, debating which side ceded more and which gained in the negotiations. NBC News, 24 Dec. 2020 Often, spectators catch a confluence of ravens and magpies that swoop in to squabble for the same fish. Jenna Kunze, Smithsonian Magazine, 3 Nov. 2020 Economists always squabble over how precisely to measure the jobless rate. Bernhard Warner, Fortune, 15 Oct. 2020 Even now, humanitarian rescue boats in the Mediterranean are often stuck for days or weeks as countries squabble over whether to accept the boat at port — and what to do with the migrants who arrive. Washington Post, 23 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'squabble.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of squabble

Noun

1602, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1604, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for squabble

Noun

probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Swedish dialect skvabbel dispute

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Time Traveler for squabble

Time Traveler

The first known use of squabble was in 1602

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Statistics for squabble

Last Updated

8 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Squabble.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/squabble. Accessed 19 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for squabble

squabble

verb

English Language Learners Definition of squabble

: to argue loudly about things that are not important

squabble

noun
squab·​ble | \ ˈskwä-bəl How to pronounce squabble (audio) \

Kids Definition of squabble

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a noisy quarrel usually over something unimportant

squabble

verb
squabbled; squabbling

Kids Definition of squabble (Entry 2 of 2)

: to quarrel noisily for little or no reason

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