snoop

1 of 2

verb

snooped; snooping; snoops

intransitive verb

: to look or pry especially in a sneaking or meddlesome manner
snooper noun

snoop

2 of 2

noun

: one that snoops

Example Sentences

Verb She locks up her diary to keep her brother from snooping. Government agencies have been snooping on them for years. She doesn't want reporters snooping into her personal life. Noun No, I didn't read your e-mail. I'm no snoop. We had a snoop around their apartment.
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
With Venus in your twelfth house of fantasy and illusion, lines can get blurred with your imagination working overtime, and that could tempt you to snoop or get unnecessarily suspicious. ELLE, 30 Nov. 2022 Tarek and Christina snoop a foreclosure in Yorba Linda, CA. Curbed, 18 Mar. 2022 The study found that 64 percent of all parents snoop around on their kids' cell phones and more than half have taken the device away to punish a child. Smriti Rao, Discover Magazine, 20 Apr. 2010 WhatsApp says its encryption, which ensures nobody can snoop on your messages, including Meta, isn’t impacted by using a proxy. WIRED, 5 Jan. 2023 Just a quick toggle permits Amazon to snoop on your phone. Scharon Harding, Ars Technica, 6 Dec. 2022 Or their mothers or cousins snoop through their drawers, find the pills and know their business. Stephanie Nolen, New York Times, 27 Sep. 2022 Disney+ When Allison tries to snoop through Winifred's beloved spell book, Binx prevents her from opening it by promptly pouncing on the cover. Joey Nolfi, EW.com, 27 Oct. 2022 The conflict comes after Angela planned to snoop through Michael's phone to find out if he's been talking to other women on Instagram. Kelly Wynne, Peoplemag, 30 Sep. 2022
Noun
Here’s how to know if a hacker or snoop is already in your smartphone. Kim Komando, USA TODAY, 10 Apr. 2022 The first is a snoop named Miriam Lewis, who lives on an adjacent houseboat. Washington Post, 29 Aug. 2021 The snoop has now seen the entire message, spying it in all its glory and while in plaintext. Lance Eliot, Forbes, 16 June 2021 Palladino was a private eye — a snoop who could dig up a crucial witness or piece of evidence or follow a money trail to clear or convict a defendant at trial. Taylor Kate Brown, San Francisco Chronicle, 2 Feb. 2021 That gives a hacker or a snoop ample opportunity to get his or her hands on your data. Kim Komando, USA TODAY, 3 Oct. 2020 Miss Butterworth is an elderly snoop who pays intense attention to the goings-on in her neighborhood. Anna Katharine Green, Star Tribune, 25 Sep. 2020 The system involves every phone constantly broadcasting Bluetooth codes, but limits any snoop's ability to eavesdrop on those codes to track a person's movements by switching up the numbers every 10 or 15 minutes. Andy Greenberg, Wired, 17 Apr. 2020 Today, the app’s 1.6 billion users can talk, text, and video chat without fear of snoops. Popsci Staff, Popular Science, 27 Dec. 2019 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'snoop.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

Dutch snoepen to buy or eat on the sly; akin to Dutch snappen to snap

First Known Use

Verb

1832, in the meaning defined above

Noun

circa 1890, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of snoop was in 1832

Dictionary Entries Near snoop

Cite this Entry

“Snoop.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/snoop. Accessed 5 Feb. 2023.

Kids Definition

snoop

1 of 2 verb
: to look or search especially in a sneaking or meddlesome manner
snooper noun

snoop

2 of 2 noun
: one that snoops

More from Merriam-Webster on snoop

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