slumber

1 of 2

verb

slum·​ber ˈsləm-bər How to pronounce slumber (audio)
slumbered; slumbering ˈsləm-b(ə-)riŋ How to pronounce slumber (audio)

intransitive verb

1
a
: to sleep lightly : doze
b
: sleep
2
a
: to be in a torpid, slothful, or negligent state
b
: to lie dormant or latent
slumberer noun

slumber

2 of 2

noun

1
a
: sleep
b
: a light sleep
2

Examples of slumber in a Sentence

Verb she slumbered for hours while the train rolled on slumbering restlessly in the tropical heat Noun She fell into deep slumber. a toddler looking so innocent and peaceful in slumber
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Neuroscientist Melanie Furrer of the University of Zurich and colleagues suspected that reindeer might simply sleep less during the short season, and then catch up on their Zs by slumbering away during the winter. Brian Handwerk, Smithsonian Magazine, 22 Dec. 2023 All around me in the sultry darkness of a beautiful resort, many of the US intelligence community’s finest minds were also slumbering. Tamsin Shaw, The New York Review of Books, 18 Jan. 2024 The digger void is at the bottom of the silo where the drill that first dug the hole was left to slumber once its job was complete. Hunter Ingram, Variety, 19 Nov. 2023 In some cases, sleepers can even get into their cars and drive while technically still slumbering. Steve Nadis, Discover Magazine, 26 Nov. 2023 The public offerings of Arm Holdings, Instacart and Klaviyo were expected to deliver a big boost to the slumbering IPO market in September. Luisa Beltran, Fortune, 20 Oct. 2023 The nuclear nightmares that kept the Cold War generation awake at night – and has been slumbering for decades – might return with a jolt. Fred Weir, The Christian Science Monitor, 2 Nov. 2023 Donors who have slumbered through every mutation of anti-Western and racially charged activity angrily closed their wallets. Nr Editors, National Review, 20 Oct. 2023 Like the offense, the defense slumbered through the first quarters of the past two games. Edward Lee, Baltimore Sun, 16 Sep. 2023
Noun
Two years prior, on Jan. 17, 1994, the Northridge earthquake shook her parents’ Porter Ranch home violently, waking her and her family from their slumber. Sean O’Rourke, Los Angeles Times, 26 Jan. 2024 The specter of trauma has long hung over Godzilla, a creature unearthed from slumber by H-bomb testing in the 1954 original. Esther Zuckerman, New York Times, 26 Jan. 2024 While bears in one of Alaska's beloved national parks prepare to fatten up for winter slumber, online visitors prepare to vote on which bear is ultimately crowned the Fat Bear Week 2023 Champion. Pilar Arias, Fox News, 4 Oct. 2023 There’s the blue, Muppet-looking Sleep (Natasia Demetriou), whose tactics for inducing slumber border on criminal, while glowing green Insomnia (Nat Faxon) terrorizes others into staying awake. Peter Debruge, Variety, 1 Feb. 2024 Even in a slumber, his black sneakers complement the denim on denim look, a testament to the impeccable taste inherited from his parents. Kerane Marcellus, Essence, 3 Jan. 2024 The Best Original Series on Netflix to Stream Now In the next scene, Aang frozen in an iceberg, finally emerges from his 100-year slumber, with Katara and Sokka looking on. Jp Mangalindan, Peoplemag, 23 Jan. 2024 But a major multibillion-dollar acquisition announced Friday could be a signal that the institutional homebuying market is awakening from its slumber. Sydney Lake, Fortune, 19 Jan. 2024 Lamont Butler’s offensive slumber continued, finishing with two points on 1 of 7 shooting. Mark Zeigler, San Diego Union-Tribune, 10 Dec. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'slumber.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

Middle English slomren, slombren, frequentative of slumen to doze, probably from slume slumber, from Old English slūma; akin to Middle High German slumen to slumber

First Known Use

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of slumber was in the 13th century

Dictionary Entries Near slumber

Cite this Entry

“Slumber.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/slumber. Accessed 29 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

slumber

1 of 2 verb
slum·​ber ˈsləm-bər How to pronounce slumber (audio)
slumbered; slumbering -b(ə-)riŋ How to pronounce slumber (audio)
1
: to sleep usually lightly
2
: to exist without being active
a slumbering volcano
slumberer noun

slumber

2 of 2 noun

More from Merriam-Webster on slumber

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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