slice

verb
\ ˈslīs How to pronounce slice (audio) \
sliced; slicing

Definition of slice

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to cut with or as if with a knife
2 : to stir or spread with a slice
3 : to hit (a ball) so that a slice results
4 : interpret, construe used in phrases like any way you slice it

intransitive verb

1 : to slice something
2 : to move with a cutting action the ship sliced through the waves

slice

noun

Definition of slice (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : a thin flat piece cut from something
b : a wedge-shaped piece (as of pie or cake)
2 : a spatula for spreading paint or ink
3 : a serving knife with wedge-shaped blade a fish slice
4 : a flight of a ball that deviates from a straight course in the direction of the dominant hand of the player propelling it also : a ball following such a course — compare hook

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Other Words from slice

Verb

sliceable \ ˈslī-​sə-​bəl How to pronounce slice (audio) \ adjective
slicer noun

Synonyms for slice

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of slice in a Sentence

Verb She sliced the lemon in half. He sliced open his finger while cleaning the fish. The knife sliced through the cake easily. Noun thin slices of roast beef The Fourth of July parade was a real slice of Americana. He hit a slice into the right rough.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb According to Blizzard, the alpha will feature the Amazon, the Barbarian and the Sorceress, which players can use to slice through Acts 1 and 2, which is actually a pretty substantial chunk of the game. Dave Thier, Forbes, "‘Diablo 2 Resurrected’: Technical Alpha Classes, Dates, And How To Sign Up," 8 Apr. 2021 The Wolves doubled up Indiana 16-8 as Towns and Jaden McDaniels hit from three-point range to slice the lead down to 13 and prompt an Indiana timeout. Chris Hine, Star Tribune, "Undermanned Indiana hands Timberwolves 141-137 loss," 7 Apr. 2021 The Spartans did slice the lead to 14 with over four minutes remaining, but the deficit was too large to overcome. David J. Kim, The Courier-Journal, "EKU men's basketball dominates South Carolina-Upstate for its third win of the season," 6 Apr. 2021 The Bruins' Jaquez Jr. drained a 3-pointer to slice the deficit to two points with 50 seconds left in overtime. Scott Gleeson, USA TODAY, "Greatest NCAA Tournament game ever? The 7 best moments from Gonzaga's buzzer-beating win vs. UCLA," 4 Apr. 2021 Over the past decade, the UK has managed to slice its emissions by about one-third—a milestone last seen in the 1880s—while growing its economy. Michael J. Coren, Quartz, "The UK is leaving Europe’s carbon market as prices hit record highs," 3 Apr. 2021 To make wheels, slice crosswise into ¼-inch rounds. Rebekah Peppler, Los Angeles Times, "How to garnish a cocktail? Here’s your guide to the basics — with a twist," 2 Apr. 2021 Tanana jumped to a 22-12 first quarter lead and had to hold on as Shaktoolik chipped away at the lead to slice Tanana’s lead to one point, 53-52, after three quarters. Anchorage Daily News, "Class 1A state basketball tournament tips off with close games," 2 Apr. 2021 Remove tofu and slice or cut into cubes, then freeze in an airtight container or freezer bag ($12, Target). Katlyn Moncada, Better Homes & Gardens, "Freezing Tofu Is the Key to Achieve an Astonishing Meat-Like Texture," 31 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In a literary landscape that still privileges the rather grandiose notion of the Great American Novel, to describe a piece of writing as a sketch or a vignette or a slice of life can come across as damning with faint praise. Jim Heynen, Star Tribune, "Review: 'The Youngest Boy,' by Jim Heynen," 9 Apr. 2021 Those teleworkers represent just a slice of the overall U.S. workforce, however. Lorraine Mirabella, baltimoresun.com, "Employees at some Baltimore businesses are finally heading back to the office, but many will keep working from home," 9 Apr. 2021 Harris’ staff ordered a slice of German chocolate cake for the vice president, and Brown Sugar Bakery gave the security detail trays of caramel, lemon and strawberry cupcakes, extras from Easter weekend. Louisa Chu, chicagotribune.com, "After Kamala Harris’ visit sparks ‘bakery vs. border’ debate, Brown Sugar Bakery gets caught in the crossfire," 9 Apr. 2021 The Yard, known for extreme shakes that are topped with things like a whole slice of cheesecake, will open up shop in June on the Vancouver waterfront. oregonlive, "Instagram-friendly milkshakes coming to the Portland area this summer," 8 Apr. 2021 Despite that nearby history, there’s a fascinating compromise proposal from ranchers, tribes and conservationists to protect this slice of sagebrush country from overgrazing. Los Angeles Times, "How I got beyond the concrete and learned to love my watershed," 8 Apr. 2021 According to the pool note, Harris said her favorite is German chocolate and gets it for her birthday each year, and her staff had preordered a slice for her. Adam Shaw, Fox News, "VP Harris visits Chicago bakery even as border crisis escalates," 7 Apr. 2021 The Japanese conglomerate today remains a major player in defense and energy at home and owns a major slice of Kioxia Holdings Corp., which is said to be focused on pursuing an initial public offering as soon as this summer. Manuel Baigorri, Fortune, "Toshiba buyout by CVC would be the largest private equity-led acquisition in years," 7 Apr. 2021 Getting a slice of the orange tier would be possible in San Diego because the state adjusted its lower threshold from 3.9 to 5.9 cases per 100,000 residents, applying the new limit retroactively statewide. Paul Sisson, San Diego Union-Tribune, "State: COVID-19 tier system will end June 15," 6 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'slice.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of slice

Verb

1551, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1613, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for slice

Verb

Middle English sklicen, from Anglo-French esclicer to splinter, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German slīzan to tear apart — more at slit

Noun

Middle English sclise, slise, from Anglo-French esclice splinter, from esclicer

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Statistics for slice

Last Updated

11 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Slice.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/slice. Accessed 13 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for slice

slice

verb

English Language Learners Definition of slice

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to cut something with a sharp object (such as a knife)
: to cut (something) into pieces or slices
: to make (something) smaller by removing part of it

slice

noun

English Language Learners Definition of slice (Entry 2 of 2)

: a thin piece of food that is cut from something larger
: a piece that is cut from a pie, cake, etc.
: a piece that is cut from a piece of fruit

slice

verb
\ ˈslīs How to pronounce slice (audio) \
sliced; slicing

Kids Definition of slice

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to cut with or as if with a knife
2 : to cut into thin flat pieces I sliced a tomato.

slice

noun

Kids Definition of slice (Entry 2 of 2)

: a thin flat piece cut from something a slice of bread

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More from Merriam-Webster on slice

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for slice

Nglish: Translation of slice for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of slice for Arabic Speakers

Comments on slice

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