slice

verb
\ ˈslīs How to pronounce slice (audio) \
sliced; slicing

Definition of slice

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to cut with or as if with a knife
2 : to stir or spread with a slice
3 : to hit (a ball) so that a slice results
4 : interpret, construe used in phrases like any way you slice it

intransitive verb

1 : to slice something
2 : to move with a cutting action the ship sliced through the waves

slice

noun

Definition of slice (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : a thin flat piece cut from something
b : a wedge-shaped piece (as of pie or cake)
2 : a spatula for spreading paint or ink
3 : a serving knife with wedge-shaped blade a fish slice
4 : a flight of a ball that deviates from a straight course in the direction of the dominant hand of the player propelling it also : a ball following such a course — compare hook

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Other Words from slice

Verb

sliceable \ ˈslī-​sə-​bəl How to pronounce sliceable (audio) \ adjective
slicer noun

Synonyms for slice

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of slice in a Sentence

Verb She sliced the lemon in half. He sliced open his finger while cleaning the fish. The knife sliced through the cake easily. Noun thin slices of roast beef The Fourth of July parade was a real slice of Americana. He hit a slice into the right rough.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The photo in the meme shows a gloved hand holding wire cutters, and those cutters are just about ready to slice through a tire’s valve stem. Bill Hand, USA TODAY, "Fact check: Yes, tires may have RFID chips. No, the government isn't tracking you.," 27 June 2020 After a nightlong struggle, contractors resorted to a diamond cutter to slice through a metal base securing his statue to a pedestal that towers more than 100 feet over a downtown square along Calhoun Street. BostonGlobe.com, "Alabama history agency admits perpetuating systemic racism," 24 June 2020 From the water-resistant composite wood handle to the sophisticated serration, this knife is for more than just cutting bread and will slice through tomatoes, melons and other delicate foods without crushing them. NBC News, "Best kitchen knives and how to buy them, according to experts," 24 June 2020 While the potatoes are boiling, slice the cucumbers no thicker than your favorite burger pickle. Dallas News, "Potato salad celebration: 4 recipes for your next socially-distanced picnic," 17 June 2020 To slice the soft and strange parts of our hearts into the clean lines culture demanded. Laurie Penny, Wired, "Live Wrong and Prosper: Covid-19 and the Future of Families," 18 June 2020 Allow chicken to rest about 5 minutes and then slice on the diagonal. Darlene Zimmerman, Detroit Free Press, "Lower-fat yogurt dressing keeps Chicken Shawarma Salad healthful," 13 June 2020 Add more cheese, pickle it up, slice those garden tomatoes. Chuck Blount, ExpressNews.com, "Chuck’s Food Shack: How to make stuffed burgers at home," 8 June 2020 To serve, slice the fish into four pieces and drizzle a generous spoonful of the hollandaise sauce over the top. Jonathan Miles, Field & Stream, "How to Cook Steelhead Wellington," 22 May 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun That means ByteDance won't be getting a slice of the country's booming digital advertising market, which is forecast to grow 26% to nearly 280 billion rupees ($3.7 billion) this year, according to advertising media company GroupM. Sherisse Pham, CNN, "TikTok ban undercuts ByteDance in one of the world's biggest digital markets," 30 June 2020 Fed officials say more than 200 banks have signed up to participate since the program began two weeks ago, but that’s a small slice of the nation’s roughly 5,000 lenders. Washington Post, "Fed’s program for loaning to Main Street off to slow start," 30 June 2020 We are privileged to have any outdoor space at all, let alone a slice of sky with a view of Manhattan. Kate Knibbs, Wired, "Quarantined in New York, We Escape Skyward," 23 June 2020 But his namesake brokerage needs to figure out how to keep a slice for itself. Telis Demos, WSJ, "Having Stolen the Spotlight, Now Robinhood Has to Dance," 18 June 2020 Instead, Love, Victor offers a brand-new slice of teenage life — while never making the journey of its hero, Cimino’s Victor Salazar, too syrupy sweet to actually enjoy. Ariana Romero, refinery29.com, "Is Love, Victor The Anti-Euphoria? This Is What Star Michael Cimino Says," 17 June 2020 Linn’s is known for its famous Olallieberry pie, which chef Renee Linn began making more than 30 years ago — don't leave the Central Coast without tasting a slice! Tanvi Chheda, Travel + Leisure, "This Long-overlooked California Region Has Offbeat Hotels, Stunning Beaches and Hiking Trails, and Some of the Best Wines in the West," 11 June 2020 By scanning the laser back and forth and compiling each slice of information, the team was able to non-invasively visualize the animals while digitally reconstructing a three-dimensional model. Popular Science, "These animals build palaces out of their own snot," 6 June 2020 This often involves the state paying a large slice of employees’ wages so that firms can keep them on the payroll during the lockdown. The Economist, "Bartleby Waging war on recessions," 20 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'slice.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of slice

Verb

1551, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1613, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for slice

Verb

Middle English sklicen, from Anglo-French esclicer to splinter, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German slīzan to tear apart — more at slit

Noun

Middle English sclise, slise, from Anglo-French esclice splinter, from esclicer

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Time Traveler for slice

Time Traveler

The first known use of slice was in 1551

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Statistics for slice

Last Updated

3 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Slice.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/slice. Accessed 4 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for slice

slice

verb
How to pronounce slice (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of slice

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to cut something with a sharp object (such as a knife)
: to cut (something) into pieces or slices
: to make (something) smaller by removing part of it

slice

noun

English Language Learners Definition of slice (Entry 2 of 2)

: a thin piece of food that is cut from something larger
: a piece that is cut from a pie, cake, etc.
: a piece that is cut from a piece of fruit

slice

verb
\ ˈslīs How to pronounce slice (audio) \
sliced; slicing

Kids Definition of slice

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to cut with or as if with a knife
2 : to cut into thin flat pieces I sliced a tomato.

slice

noun

Kids Definition of slice (Entry 2 of 2)

: a thin flat piece cut from something a slice of bread

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More from Merriam-Webster on slice

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for slice

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with slice

Spanish Central: Translation of slice

Nglish: Translation of slice for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of slice for Arabic Speakers

Comments on slice

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