slice

verb
\ ˈslīs How to pronounce slice (audio) \
sliced; slicing

Definition of slice

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to cut with or as if with a knife
2 : to stir or spread with a slice
3 : to hit (a ball) so that a slice results
4 : interpret, construe used in phrases like any way you slice it

intransitive verb

1 : to slice something
2 : to move with a cutting action the ship sliced through the waves

slice

noun

Definition of slice (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : a thin flat piece cut from something
b : a wedge-shaped piece (as of pie or cake)
2 : a spatula for spreading paint or ink
3 : a serving knife with wedge-shaped blade a fish slice
4 : a flight of a ball that deviates from a straight course in the direction of the dominant hand of the player propelling it also : a ball following such a course — compare hook

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Other Words from slice

Verb

sliceable \ ˈslī-​sə-​bəl How to pronounce sliceable (audio) \ adjective
slicer noun

Synonyms for slice

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of slice in a Sentence

Verb She sliced the lemon in half. He sliced open his finger while cleaning the fish. The knife sliced through the cake easily. Noun thin slices of roast beef The Fourth of July parade was a real slice of Americana. He hit a slice into the right rough.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Our favorite mandoline Many of us have been cooking at home more, which has reminded us of one thing: how tedious slicing vegetables is. Courtney Campbell, USA TODAY, "The 20 most popular things people are buying right now," 15 May 2020 This powerful but less expensive food processor comes with a slicing disc, a shredding disc, and a chopping blade. Tony Vaz, Popular Science, "High-powered food processors for the home chef," 15 Oct. 2019 Obviously, some customers making Katsu Chicken might consider the pre-slicing to be worth an extra 40 cents a pound. Ramona Sentinel, "Ask Mr. Marketing: Paying for convenience," 24 Sep. 2019 Many times when making a steak, the chefs slice it before serving the judges. The Washington Post, "Ask Tom: Readers share how their daily routines have changed and what takeout they favor. And more.," 8 Apr. 2020 Sprinkle it with sea salt and abundant coarse pepper before adding anchovies, thinly sliced raw red onions, and lots of fresh basil. Megan Spurrell, Condé Nast Traveler, "16 of the World’s Best Chefs on Ingredients to Spice Up Your Home Cooking," 7 Apr. 2020 Porsche has plenty of experience thinly slicing its pies—and plenty of customers willing to pay for a taste. Jared Gall, Car and Driver, "Upcoming Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 RS Could Have 500 HP," 7 Apr. 2020 Invest in a mandoline to slice veggies super-thin for a crisp salad that perfectly balances rich pork tenderloin. Woman's Day Kitchen, Woman's Day, "Spice-Dusted Pork With Crunchy Vegetable Salad," 22 Jan. 2020 Glendale got on the board just before halftime with a 31-yard pass from Estrada to Ethan Aldrete to slice the Burroughs advantage to 20-6. Vincent Nguyenstaff Writer, Burbank Leader, "Burroughs football takes hold of league game in victory over Glendale," 20 Sep. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Underneath the soap-operatic machinations of the plot, Straub skewers a certain slice of bourgeois upstate society here. Josephine Livingstone, The New Republic, "A Beach Read With Teeth," 15 May 2020 So Marcus put together a package that included a tub of popcorn, some Marcus Theatres cups and, to sweeten the deal, a slice of 35-millimeter film. Journal Sentinel Staff, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "4 ways Milwaukeeans are coping with the 'new normal,' from re-creating classic art to movie popcorn to go," 11 May 2020 While a slice of their classroom time involved instruction about the Catholic religion, [the two teachers] performed this duty strictly from workbooks, not as preachers of the faith. Los Angeles Times, "Does L.A. Catholic school have a religious-liberty right to fire a teacher who gets cancer?," 10 May 2020 Gorō provokes a belligerent regular by lobbing a slice of naruto, a scalloped white round of fish paste with a candy-pink swirl, at him (the ramen shop equivalent of a pie in the face). Sophie Pinkham, The New York Review of Books, "My Quarantine: Savoring the Ramen Western," 8 May 2020 In a recent study in a small slice of the Mission District, 95% of the people who tested positive for the coronavirus were Latino, even though the group made up just 44% of those screened. Joaquin Palomino, San Francisco Chronicle, "Latinos’ coronavirus burden," 8 May 2020 Guests can order a slice of cheesecake for $4.99, and beer, wine or cocktails to go. Audrey Eads, Dallas News, "D-FW restaurants offering takeout, dine-in meals for Mother’s Day," 4 May 2020 If your kids need their own slice of solitude, maybe to watch their favorite Netflix show or Disney+ movie, Puro’s PuroQuiet headphones are the ideal solution. Ryan Waniata, USA TODAY, "10 great headphones to help you work from home," 26 Mar. 2020 The property also comes with its own slice of private beach. Katherine Clarke, WSJ, "A Modern Mansion on Malibu’s Tony Beachfront Lists for $115 Million," 28 Jan. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'slice.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of slice

Verb

1551, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1613, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for slice

Verb

Middle English sklicen, from Anglo-French esclicer to splinter, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German slīzan to tear apart — more at slit

Noun

Middle English sclise, slise, from Anglo-French esclice splinter, from esclicer

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Time Traveler for slice

Time Traveler

The first known use of slice was in 1551

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Statistics for slice

Last Updated

22 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Slice.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/slice. Accessed 29 May. 2020.

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More Definitions for slice

slice

verb
How to pronounce slice (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of slice

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to cut something with a sharp object (such as a knife)
: to cut (something) into pieces or slices
: to make (something) smaller by removing part of it

slice

noun

English Language Learners Definition of slice (Entry 2 of 2)

: a thin piece of food that is cut from something larger
: a piece that is cut from a pie, cake, etc.
: a piece that is cut from a piece of fruit

slice

verb
\ ˈslīs How to pronounce slice (audio) \
sliced; slicing

Kids Definition of slice

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to cut with or as if with a knife
2 : to cut into thin flat pieces I sliced a tomato.

slice

noun

Kids Definition of slice (Entry 2 of 2)

: a thin flat piece cut from something a slice of bread

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More from Merriam-Webster on slice

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for slice

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with slice

Spanish Central: Translation of slice

Nglish: Translation of slice for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of slice for Arabic Speakers

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