sick

adjective
\ˈsik \

Definition of sick 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a(1) : affected with disease or ill health : ailing

(2) : of, relating to, or intended for use in sickness took five sick days this month a sick ward

b : queasy, nauseated sick to one's stomach was sick in the car

c : undergoing menstruation

2 : spiritually or morally unsound or corrupt

3a : sickened by strong emotion sick with fear worried sick

b : having a strong distaste from surfeit : satiated sick of flattery

c : filled with disgust or chagrin gossip makes me sick

d : depressed and longing for something sick for one's home

4a : mentally or emotionally unsound or disordered : morbid sick thoughts

b : highly distasteful : macabre, sadistic sick jokes a sick crime

5 : lacking vigor : sickly: such as

a : badly outclassed made the competition look sick

b : incapable of producing profitable yields of a crop sick soils

6 slang : outstandingly or amazingly good or impressive Rookie was phenomenal Friday. His goal was nice, but the pass to twin brother, Chris, … was downright sick.— Roy Lang III

sick

noun

Definition of sick (Entry 2 of 2)

British

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Other Words from sick

Adjective

sickly adverb

Synonyms & Antonyms for sick

Synonyms: Adjective

ailing, bad, down, ill, indisposed, peaked, peaky, poorly, punk, run-down, sickened, unhealthy, unsound, unwell

Antonyms: Adjective

hale, healthful, healthy, sound, well, whole, wholesome

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Examples of sick in a Sentence

Adjective

He is at home sick in bed. She is sick with the flu. I'm too sick to go to work. The medicine just made me sicker. The sickest patients are in intensive care. My poor rosebush looks sick. She has been on the sick list all week. The way they treat people makes me sick.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

If the lawsuit succeeds, the chasm between sick and healthy would return. Sarah Gantz, chicagotribune.com, "Ever been depressed? Had cancer? Preexisting conditions can define your future," 3 July 2018 Yet now his administration has sided with a lawsuit by 20 states seeking to overturn the Affordable Care Act’s provisions to keep insurance costs from surging when people are sick or need costly medications. Mark Trumbull, The Christian Science Monitor, "Amid legal attack on key health-law provision, uncertainty and uproar," 15 June 2018 Unlike typical vultures however, the black vulture attacks living animals as well as those sick or already dead. Jordyn Hermani, Indianapolis Star, "Black vultures are eating cows alive. But it's difficult to legally kill the birds.," 13 July 2018 More companies also offer paid leave to take care of sick family members. Simon Montlake, The Christian Science Monitor, "Paid family leave: While US lags behind, more states set policies," 12 July 2018 Adjust their diet One sign of a sick pet is a loss of appetite. Lainey Seyler, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "My cat will never die, but in case he does get sick, Lap of Love vet has some tips," 10 July 2018 The payments were designed to stop insurers from losing money on very sick patients, who are the most expensive to treat. Andrea K. Mcdaniels, baltimoresun.com, "Maryland insurers say Trump Administration to cut health payments destabilizes market," 9 July 2018 Candelario showed up to the ballpark sick, so Gardenhire told him to go back to the hotel, rest, and return before the game. Anthony Fenech, Detroit Free Press, "Willie Mays, Hank Aaron atop Detroit Tigers lineup? Gardenhire pranked," 9 July 2018 In fact, the thought might leave him a little sick. SI.com, "Cesc Fabregas Burns Spurs Fan on Twitter After Being Asked to Make Cross-London Switch," 6 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'sick.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of sick

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Noun

1957, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for sick

Adjective

Middle English sek, sik, from Old English sēoc; akin to Old High German sioh sick

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Statistics for sick

Last Updated

7 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for sick

The first known use of sick was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for sick

sick

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of sick

: affected with a disease or illness

: of or relating to people who are ill

: very annoyed or bored by something because you have had too much of it

sick

adjective
\ˈsik \
sicker; sickest

Kids Definition of sick

1 : affected with disease or illness : not well

2 : of, relating to, or intended for use in or during illness sick pay

3 : affected with or accompanied by nausea The bobbing of the boat made me feel sick.

4 : badly upset by strong emotion I was sick with worry.

5 : annoyed or bored of something from having too much of it We were sick of his whining.

6 : filled with disgust or anger Such gossip makes me sick.

sick

adjective
\ˈsik \

Medical Definition of sick 

1a : affected with disease or ill health

b : of, relating to, or intended for use in sickness a sick ward

c : affected with nausea : inclined to vomit or being in the act of vomiting sick to one's stomach was sick in the car

2 : mentally or emotionally unsound or disordered

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Comments on sick

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