scuttle

1 of 5

verb (1)

scut·​tle ˈskə-tᵊl How to pronounce scuttle (audio)
scuttled; scuttling ˈskə-tᵊl-iŋ How to pronounce scuttle (audio)
ˈskət-liŋ

scuttle

2 of 5

noun (1)

1
: a quick shuffling pace
2
: a short swift run

scuttle

3 of 5

verb (2)

scuttled; scuttling

transitive verb

1
2
: to cut a hole through the bottom, deck, or side of (a ship)
specifically : to sink or attempt to sink by making holes through the bottom

scuttle

4 of 5

noun (2)

1
: a small opening in a wall or roof furnished with a lid: such as
a
: a small opening or hatchway in the deck of a ship large enough to admit a person and with a lid for covering it
b
: a small hole in the side or bottom of a ship fitted with a covering or glazed
2
: a covering that closes a scuttle

scuttle

5 of 5

noun (3)

1
: a shallow open basket for carrying something (such as grain or garden produce)
2
: a metal pail that usually has a bail and a sloped lip and is used especially for carrying coal

Examples of scuttle in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
The 95th Academy Awards snared an average audience of 18.7 million viewers, the Oscars’ best audience since the 2020 awards, which took place before the coronavirus pandemic that forced movie theaters to close and many Hollywood projects to be scuttled. Brian Steinberg, Variety, 22 Feb. 2024 Then this week, Republicans − at the urging of Donald Trump − scuttled the bipartisan border deal, four months in the making. Joey Garrison, USA TODAY, 10 Feb. 2024 This expansion in its ambitions scuttled the potential for peace. TIME, 10 Jan. 2024 The Globes save room for Taylor Swift Five years ago, the attempt to add a popular-film Oscar was met with such widespread derision that the idea was scuttled a mere month after its announcement. Kyle Buchanan, New York Times, 11 Dec. 2023 Land says the prototype was scuttled following the accident and a new design involved many changes. Michael Verdon, Robb Report, 6 Feb. 2024 That's despite heavy opposition from House Republicans that might scuttle the effort -- at least for the time being. Quinn Owen, ABC News, 6 Feb. 2024 The industry’s efforts to scuttle the proposal have included websites such as americanscantaffordit.com and stopbaselendgame.com, a constant stream of research papers detailing the plan’s failings, influence campaigns on Capitol Hill, and even threats to sue the regulators. Emily Flitter, New York Times, 18 Jan. 2024 But a federal judge in Boston scuttled that plan by ruling Tuesday that JetBlue’s $3.8 billion proposal to buy Spirit violates antitrust law. David Koenig, Fortune, 18 Jan. 2024
Noun
On today's The Excerpt podcast, the Israeli Supreme Court scuttles a key part of Netanyahu's judicial reform amid troop pullout. USA TODAY, 2 Jan. 2024 This Apple-Beeper scuttle has continued for a month, reports TechCrunch. Byalexandra Sternlicht, Fortune, 22 Dec. 2023 This little creature scuttles along the seafloor around Antarctica, and in new research, scientists use its genetics to argue that a major Antarctic ice sheet completely collapsed at a time in the past when temperatures were just one degree Celsius warmer than the preindustrial period. Meghan Bartels, Scientific American, 21 Dec. 2023 The ruling scuttles Prime Minister Rishi Sunak’s marquee policy to curb migration and offers a warning shot to other European nations considering similar plans. Max Colchester, WSJ, 15 Nov. 2023 Classical simulations can also control the noise that plagues real quantum processors and often scuttles quantum runs. IEEE Spectrum, 3 Oct. 2023 This snapping shrimp scuttles through the reefs around Ambon Island in Indonesia, creating a cacophony with its closing claw. Sam Walters, Discover Magazine, 17 Oct. 2023 The deal scuttles city or county efforts to pursue higher wage boosts until the agreement expires in 2029. Suhauna Hussain, Los Angeles Times, 13 Sep. 2023 The scuttle of fiddler crabs no longer accompanies walks to a nearby creek. James Pollard, BostonGlobe.com, 12 Aug. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'scuttle.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun (1)

perhaps blend of scud and shuttle

Noun (2)

Middle English skottell lid of a scuttle

Noun (3)

Middle English scutel, from Latin scutella drinking bowl, tray, diminutive of scutra platter

First Known Use

Verb (1)

1657, in the meaning defined above

Noun (1)

1623, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (2)

1642, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Noun (2)

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun (3)

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of scuttle was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near scuttle

Cite this Entry

“Scuttle.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scuttle. Accessed 5 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

scuttle

1 of 5 noun
scut·​tle ˈskət-ᵊl How to pronounce scuttle (audio)
: a metal pail for carrying coal

scuttle

2 of 5 noun
: a small opening (as in the deck of a ship or the roof of a house) with a lid or cover
also : its lid

scuttle

3 of 5 verb
scuttled; scuttling ˈskət-liŋ How to pronounce scuttle (audio) -ᵊl-iŋ How to pronounce scuttle (audio)
1
: to sink by cutting holes through the bottom or sides
scuttle a ship
2
: to put an end to by a deliberate act
scuttle a conference

scuttle

4 of 5 verb
scuttled; scuttling
ˈskət-liŋ,
-ᵊl-iŋ
: scurry

scuttle

5 of 5 noun
1
: a quick scuffing pace
2
: a short swift run
Etymology

Noun

Middle English scutel "a shallow basket for carrying things," from Latin scutella "drinking bowl"

Noun

Middle English skottell "lid of a scuttle"

Verb

probably a combination of 1scud and 2shuttle

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