scout

1 of 3

verb (1)

scouted; scouting; scouts

intransitive verb

1
: to explore an area to obtain information (as about an enemy)
2
a
: to make a search
b
: to work as a talent scout

transitive verb

1
: to observe in order to obtain information or evaluate
2
: to explore in order to obtain information
3
: to find by making a search

scout

2 of 3

noun

plural scouts
1
a
: one sent to obtain information
especially : a soldier, ship, or plane sent out in war to reconnoiter
c sports
(1)
: a person sent out to secure firsthand information about the style of play, tactics, and strength of a rival
(2)
: a person sent out to obtain information about players by watching them in action with a view to making recommendations about the acquisition of players
2
a
: the act of scouting
b
: a scouting expedition : reconnaissance
3
often capitalized : a member of any of various scouting movements: such as
a
4
: individual, person
used chiefly in the phrase good scout

scout

3 of 3

verb (2)

scouted; scouting; scouts

transitive verb

1
: mock
2
: to reject scornfully
scouted his explanation as a shabby falsehoodMark Twain

Examples of scout in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Which is, initially scouted for good indoor/outdoor locations that were easily available and aesthetically inclined for an action film and began writing the story around it. Abdo Riani, Forbes, 21 Feb. 2024 While running her boutiques, Ms. Hickey regularly traveled to Europe as a buyer — and, effectively, as a tastemaker — scouting for dresses by designers like Karl Lagerfeld, Ursula of Switzerland and the noted British designers David and Elizabeth Emanuel. Alex Williams, New York Times, 20 Feb. 2024 Boosted by Saudi riches, Newcastle qualified for the Champions League this season for the first time in two decades while Brighton has emerged as one of the most forward-thinking clubs in England owing to a shrewd scouting network in Europe and South America. Steve Douglas, USA TODAY, 19 Feb. 2024 In Kansas, for example, drones may be used to scout land that is not owned or managed by the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, but they can’t be used for hunting, tracking, or recovering game animals. Hayden Sammak, Outdoor Life, 8 Feb. 2024 Several of his guides scouted the river in the preceding weeks. Pete Zimowsky, Idaho Statesman, 31 Jan. 2024 Newark has been scouting for tenants to occupy the big office building. George Avalos, The Mercury News, 13 Feb. 2024 And while brands may be knocking on his door for collabs (a testament to the power of great runway beauty), Chavarria scouted Haltane completely on his own. Arden Fanning Andrews, Vogue, 10 Feb. 2024 Last January, Dana Brown took over after serving as a scouting executive in Atlanta. Daniel R. Epstein, Forbes, 10 Feb. 2024
Noun
There may be no harder time of the year to keep a secret in the NBA than the build up to the trade deadline, as scouts, executives, coaches, players and agents all gossip with reporters about who could move where and what that deal could cost. Dan Woike, Los Angeles Times, 8 Feb. 2024 Meanwhile, there were nearly 20 times that number of roles for coaches and scouts. Laura Bratton, Quartz, 7 Feb. 2024 That could change, of course, but those two are the only KU players on scouts’ radar right now. Shreyas Laddha, Kansas City Star, 2 Feb. 2024 But Milicic is budding under Aaron Fearne, and NBA scouts are taking notice. Hunter Bailey, Charlotte Observer, 1 Feb. 2024 Last in the line of march is our game scout, Smart, who is that, and the quietest of the bunch. David E. Petzal, Field & Stream, 31 Jan. 2024 Despite Tart’s passion for football, college scouts didn’t share the same love for the big kid from Philly. Walter Villa, Miami Herald, 30 Jan. 2024 Eight days into the same gathering, about 40,000 teenage scouts were evacuated ahead of a typhoon. Diana Baptista, The Christian Science Monitor, 24 Jan. 2024 Molitor remembers around 20 to 30 scouts being in attendance that day. Betsy Helfand, Twin Cities, 22 Jan. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'scout.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb (1)

Middle English, from Anglo-French escuter to listen, from Latin auscultare — more at auscultation

Verb (2)

probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse skūti taunt; akin to Old English scēotan to shoot — more at shoot

First Known Use

Verb (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1534, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb (2)

1605, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of scout was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near scout

Cite this Entry

“Scout.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scout. Accessed 1 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

scout

1 of 3 verb
1
: to go about and observe in search of information : reconnoiter
2
a
: to make a search
scout about for firewood
b
: to find by searching
scouted up the necessary supplies

scout

2 of 3 noun
1
a
: one sent to obtain information and especially to survey in preparation for military action in war
b
: a person who searches for talented newcomers
a baseball scout
2
: the act or an instance of scouting : reconnaissance
3
often capitalized
a
4
: individual entry 2 sense 2, person
you're a good scout

scout

3 of 3 verb
1
2
: to reject as foolish
Etymology

Verb

Middle English scouten "to explore an area for information," from early French escouter "to listen," from Latin auscultare "to listen"

Verb

of Scandinavian origin

More from Merriam-Webster on scout

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