scar

1 of 3

noun (1)

1
: an isolated or protruding rock
2
: a steep rocky eminence : a bare place on the side of a mountain

scar

2 of 3

noun (2)

1
: a mark remaining (as on the skin) after injured tissue has healed
2
: a mark left where something was previously attached : cicatrix sense 2
especially : a mark left on a stem or branch where a leaf or fruit has separated
3
: a mark or indentation (as on furniture) resulting from damage or wear
4
: a lasting moral or emotional injury
one of his men had been killed … in a manner that left a scar upon his mindH. G. Wells
scarless adjective

scar

3 of 3

verb

scarred; scarring

transitive verb

1
: to mark with a scar
2
: to do lasting injury to

intransitive verb

1
: to form a scar
2
: to become scarred

Examples of scar in a Sentence

Verb His arm was badly scarred after the accident. The tragedy left her emotionally scarred. Your shoes are scarring the floor. The fence was scarred by rust.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
William, however, still bears the scars of the pitiless coverage of his mother, Diana, Princess of Wales, which ended with her death in a car accident in Paris in 1997, pursued by the paparazzi. Mark Landler, New York Times, 7 Feb. 2024 Landslides were reported in the Hollywood Hills and the Santa Monica Mountains, and evacuation orders and warnings were issued for residents in and around wildfire burn scars in Sun Valley, Topanga, Juniper Hills and other areas. Hayley Smith, Los Angeles Times, 6 Feb. 2024 The psychological scars from their childhood led them to seek relief through drugs and alcohol. Maggie Freleng, Rolling Stone, 29 Jan. 2024 Peale didn’t omit Washington’s smallpox scars from his left cheek. Brian T. Allen, National Review, 27 Jan. 2024 Other types of skin cancer (basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma), while less deadly, can cause serious health issues and result in surgeries and disfiguring scars. Keyvan Nouri, M.d., Jessica Cervantes and John Tsatalis, Miami Herald, 30 Jan. 2024 In the middle, like some scar or deformity, lies a jagged expanse of civilization, garish polychromatic swaths of development blending into one another with only jutting casino high-rises and the slash of Highway 50 serving as compass points. Sacramento Bee, 30 Jan. 2024 Espinosa holds up a length of wire extending from the box, its black sheathing bearing fresh little scars. Ethan Baron, The Mercury News, 22 Jan. 2024 The greater the inflammation, the higher the chance of developing lasting scars. Angela Palmer, Verywell Health, 17 Jan. 2024
Verb
Unlike Martinique, Algeria had recently been scarred by violence, most notably in 1945, when, after a clash with nationalists, the French massacred thousands of Algerians. The New Yorker, 24 Jan. 2024 It’s said to lessen the appearance of face acne scarring, hyperpigmentation, and sun damage. Jenn Barthole, Glamour, 23 Jan. 2024 But the drug didn't appear to significantly help people who have already developed scarring. Stephanie Brown, Verywell Health, 13 Dec. 2023 The lasers’ smaller, extremely localized incisions could allow tissue to heal faster and reduce scarring in the long run. Andrew Paul, Popular Science, 6 Dec. 2023 These biopsies, while essential for diagnosis, come with risks, including scarring. Christina Ruffini, CBS News, 30 Oct. 2023 Although Hasani received extensive veterinary care, the illness scarred his lungs so severely that officials were forced to euthanize him. Pam Kragen, San Diego Union-Tribune, 4 Jan. 2024 There's still scarring a little bit that's going away. Hannah Sacks, Peoplemag, 29 Dec. 2023 Although researchers have some ideas, there’s still no treatment to reverse the intense scarring characteristic of severe liver disease. Isabella Cueto, STAT, 28 Dec. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'scar.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun (1)

Middle English skere, from Old Norse sker skerry; probably akin to Old Norse skera to cut — more at shear

Noun (2)

Middle English escare, scar, from Middle French escare scab, from Late Latin eschara, from Greek, hearth, brazier, scab

First Known Use

Noun (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun (2)

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1555, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of scar was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near scar

Cite this Entry

“Scar.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scar. Accessed 25 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

scar

1 of 2 noun
1
: a mark left (as on the skin) after injured tissue has healed
2
: a mark on a stem or branch where a leaf or fruit has separated
3
: a mark (as on furniture) resembling a scar
4
: a lasting injury from a bad experience

scar

2 of 2 verb
scarred; scarring
1
: to mark with or form a scar
2
: to do lasting injury to
3
: to become scarred

Medical Definition

scar

1 of 2 noun
1
: a mark left (as in the skin) by the healing of injured tissue
2
: a lasting emotional injury
psychological scars

scar

2 of 2 verb
scarred; scarring

transitive verb

: to mark with a scar
scarred heart valves

intransitive verb

1
: to form a scar
2
: to become scarred

More from Merriam-Webster on scar

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