scab

noun
\ ˈskab How to pronounce scab (audio) \

Definition of scab

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : scabies of domestic animals
2 : a crust of hardened blood and serum over a wound
3a : a contemptible person
b(1) : a worker who refuses to join a labor union
(2) : a union member who refuses to strike or returns to work before a strike has ended
(3) : a worker who accepts employment or replaces a union worker during a strike
(4) : one who works for less than union wages or on nonunion terms
4 : any of various bacterial or fungus diseases of plants characterized by crustaceous spots also : one of the spots

scab

verb
scabbed; scabbing

Definition of scab (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to become covered with a scab
2 : to act as a scab

Examples of scab in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Everyone engages in occasional self-grooming behaviors, such as nibbling on a jagged finger nail or picking at a blemish or scab. Washington Post, 12 Feb. 2021 Edward Jenner, the English physician who came up with the smallpox vaccine, nicked recipients with a knife or scalpel, and then filled the cut with pus or remnants of a smallpox scab. Katherine Ellen Foley, Quartz, 5 Apr. 2021 Getting the news felt like ripping off a still-tender scab. Libor Jany, Star Tribune, 25 Jan. 2021 Throughout the 18th century, the best way to protect against smallpox was inoculation, a process by which a doctor would introduce smallpox pustules, perhaps from the scab of a smallpox patient, into someone's skin. Ryan Prior, CNN, 22 Dec. 2020 Push-button start is now standard, but the old ignition slot by the steering wheel is still there, covered with a scab of plastic. Ezra Dyer, Car and Driver, 15 Sep. 2020 The rough blotchy areas on the fruit surface are a symptom of pear scab. oregonlive, 23 Aug. 2020 As the days went by, a sort of skin or scab grew over the memory of her arrest. Hari Kunzru, The New Yorker, 29 June 2020 Now Biden's vice presidential selection committee is scratching at that old political scab by considering Susan Rice as a top contender to become his 2020 running mate. Naomi Lim, Washington Examiner, 16 June 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Let succulent cuts dry out and scab over for a day or two before planting. oregonlive, 8 Apr. 2021 Typically, the vaccinated area would form a blister, scab over, and leave behind a distinctive scar. Jordan E. Taylor, Time, 5 Apr. 2021 The formation of these media-relations fiascos tends to scar and scab over the conscience, to treat it as an irrelevance or, at best, a private problem to be overcome. Michael Brendan Dougherty, National Review, 5 Mar. 2021 Some people may form blisters or scab over in the few days, as the extreme cold has destroyed the skin cells in order to make the skin tag go away. Kristi Kellogg, Allure, 12 Aug. 2020 Soldiers marching to Rome from Mesopotamia in late 165 AD were ill, many covered in red and black papules that eventually would scab over and fall off. Fox News, 22 Apr. 2020 The rash consists of small blisters that typically scab over in seven to 10 days and clear up within two-to-four weeks. Julie Washington, cleveland, 12 Jan. 2020 The rash consists of small blisters that typically scab over in seven to 10 days and clear up within two-to-four weeks. Julie Washington, cleveland, 12 Jan. 2020 The rash consists of small blisters that typically scab over in seven to 10 days and clear up within two-to-four weeks. Julie Washington, cleveland, 12 Jan. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scab.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of scab

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1683, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for scab

Noun

Middle English, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Swedish skabbr scab; akin to Old English sceabb scab, Latin scabere to scratch — more at shave

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Time Traveler for scab

Time Traveler

The first known use of scab was in the 13th century

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Statistics for scab

Last Updated

31 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Scab.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scab. Accessed 23 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for scab

scab

noun

English Language Learners Definition of scab

: a hard covering of dried blood that forms over a wound to cover and protect it as it heals
informal + disapproving : a worker who does not join a strike or who takes the place of another worker who is on strike

scab

noun
\ ˈskab How to pronounce scab (audio) \

Kids Definition of scab

: a crust mostly of hardened blood that forms over and protects a sore or wound as it heals

scab

noun
\ ˈskab How to pronounce scab (audio) \

Medical Definition of scab

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : scabies of domestic animals
2 : a hardened covering of dried secretions (as blood, plasma, or pus) that forms over a wound

called also crust

Other Words from scab

scabby \ -​ē How to pronounce scab (audio) \ adjective scabbier; scabbiest
scabbed; scabbing

Medical Definition of scab (Entry 2 of 2)

: to become covered with a scab the wound scabbed over

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scab

noun

Legal Definition of scab

1 : a worker who refuses to join a labor union
2 : a union member who refuses to strike or returns to work before a strike has ended
3 : a worker who accepts employment or replaces a union worker during a strike : strikebreaker
4 : one who works for less than union wages or on nonunion terms

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