sanguine

adjective
san·​guine | \ ˈsaŋ-gwən How to pronounce sanguine (audio) \

Definition of sanguine

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : marked by eager hopefulness : confidently optimistic In the month of August 1994, Democrats remained sanguine about their chances at the polls …— John B. Judis A lot of attention also is being devoted to the development of vaccines to prevent genital herpes, although not everyone is sanguine about the outcome.The Journal of the American Medical Association
2 : bloodred … the radiant heat from the cedar logs, whose sanguine colour made the silvered locks of his hair into a fantastic wreath of flames.— Elinor Wylie
3a : consisting of or relating to blood … some sanguine vessels are obstructed, and distended …— Theophilus Lobb
b : bloodthirsty, sanguinary … attacked by the sanguine … warriors of neighboring islands …— Ana Y. Ramos-Zayas
c : accompanied by, involving, or relating to bloodshed : bloody … from the numerous graves, including those by the barn, which our shells had destroyed; we realized what a sanguine battle it had been …— Frederick W. Wild
d of the complexion : ruddy She was all unnerved; her naturally sanguine complexion was pale …— Charlotte Brontë
4 : having blood as the predominating bodily humor — see humor entry 1 sense 2c An abundance of red blood was marked by a warm and sanguine temperament; whereas, an excess of yellow bile produced the choleric temperament …— Samuel Lytler Metcalfe also : having the bodily conformation and temperament held characteristic of such predominance and marked by sturdiness, healthy red complexion, and cheerfulness He conceived himself rather as a sanguine and strenuous man, a great fighter. — G. K. Chesterton

sanguine

noun
san·​guine | \ ˈsaŋ-gwən How to pronounce sanguine (audio) \

Definition of sanguine (Entry 2 of 2)

: a moderate to strong red

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Other Words from sanguine

Adjective

sanguinely adverb
sanguineness \ ˈsaŋ-​gwən-​nəs How to pronounce sanguine (audio) \ noun
sanguinity \ saŋ-​ˈgwi-​nə-​tē How to pronounce sanguine (audio) , san-​ \ noun

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Adjective

Sanguine has quite a few relatives in English. Sangfroid ("self-possession especially under strain") and sanguineous ("bloodthirsty") are consanguineous with sanguine. (Consanguineous, means "descended from the same ancestor.") The tie that binds these words is sanguis, the Latin word for blood. Exsanguination ("the draining or losing of blood"), sanguinary ("murderous" or "bloody"), and the rare sangsue ("leech") and sanguinolent ("tinged with blood") are also sanguis relatives. That's something you can raise a glass of sangaree or sangria ("a usually iced punch made of red wine, fruit juice, and soda water") to!

Examples of sanguine in a Sentence

Adjective He has been strangely sanguine about this, blandly ignoring the mounting evidence that dissident elements in the police are stirring trouble … — Allister Sparks, Washington Post, 9–15 Mar. 1992 How could a man of his caliber be this sanguine about a war we had barely begun to fight? He gave me the McNamara look, eyes focusing boldly through rimless glasses. "Every quantitative measurement we have shows that we're winning this war," he said. — Neil Sheehan, A Bright Shining Lie, 1988 Yet if there were sanguine expectations of war profits and unlimited booty from the Spanish empire, … those hopes were dramatically confounded … — Simon Schama, The Embarrassment of Riches, 1988 He does not pretend to be sanguine about our prospects. History itself, he reminds us, provides few examples of cultures as debilitated as ours which were not destroyed by the very forces they set in motion. — Gertrude Himmelfarb, The New History and the Old, 1987 She has a sanguine disposition. He is sanguine about the company's future.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective That doesn’t mean Ochre House artistic director Matthew Posey is sanguine about the results. Manuel Mendoza, Dallas News, 22 July 2021 If he and, to a lesser extent, Shlomo are less sanguine about the Haarts’ exodus than their sisters, the implication is that it’s because the frum lifestyle is so much harder on women. Judy Berman, Time, 14 July 2021 Perhaps this explains why the Biden administration has been so sanguine about rising oil prices. Dan Eberhart, Forbes, 3 July 2021 Other experts are not so sanguine, saying hackers have proved adept at devising new ways to overcome cyberdefenses. Del Quentin Wilber Staff Writer, Los Angeles Times, 11 May 2021 Software engineer and blogger Kevin Dangoor, however, isn’t so sanguine. Aaron Pressman, Fortune, 23 Apr. 2021 Lex points out that shareholders so far have remained sanguine. Neil Winton, Forbes, 7 July 2021 The main expression of inflation worry is not even at the Fed, particularly since markets seem sanguine and Fed officials continue to project confidence in their new framework. Tim Fernholz, Quartz, 16 June 2021 That experience may leave him more sanguine than most. Stephen Collinson, CNN, 9 June 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Yet on Wall Street, the scene is the other kind of sanguine: The stock has slipped into the red for the year. Hannah Levitt, Los Angeles Times, 20 Aug. 2019 But not all involved with the legal defense are sanguine that Giuliani can succeed where others have failed. Gloria Borger, CNN, 20 Apr. 2018 Here, there are more than 90 options ranging from yuzu to orange sanguine, speculoos to fig. Kristen Bateman, Vogue, 7 July 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'sanguine.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of sanguine

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for sanguine

Adjective and Noun

Middle English sanguin, from Anglo-French, from Latin sanguineus, from sanguin-, sanguis — see sanguinary

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Time Traveler for sanguine

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The first known use of sanguine was in the 14th century

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Last Updated

26 Jul 2021

Cite this Entry

“Sanguine.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sanguine. Accessed 26 Jul. 2021.

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More Definitions for sanguine

sanguine

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of sanguine

formal : confident and hopeful

sanguine

adjective
san·​guine | \ ˈsaŋ-gwən How to pronounce sanguine (audio) \

Medical Definition of sanguine

1a : consisting of or relating to blood
b of the complexion : ruddy
2 : having blood as the predominating bodily humor also : having the bodily conformation and temperament held characteristic of such predominance and marked by sturdiness, high color, and cheerfulness

More from Merriam-Webster on sanguine

Nglish: Translation of sanguine for Spanish Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about sanguine

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