rustle

verb
rus·​tle | \ ˈrə-səl How to pronounce rustle (audio) \
rustled; rustling\ ˈrə-​s(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce rustling (audio) \

Definition of rustle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to make or cause a rustle
2a : to act or move with energy or speed
b : to forage food
3 : to steal cattle

transitive verb

1 : to cause to rustle
2a : to obtain by one's own exertions often used with up able to rustle up $5,000 bail— Jack McCallum
b : forage
3 : to steal (livestock) especially from a farm or ranch

rustle

noun

Definition of rustle (Entry 2 of 2)

: a quick succession or confusion of small sounds

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Other Words from rustle

Verb

rustler \ ˈrə-​s(ə-​)lər How to pronounce rustler (audio) \ noun

Synonyms for rustle

Synonyms: Verb

browse, forage, graze, pasture

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Examples of rustle in a Sentence

Verb

The trees rustled in the wind. Her skirt rustled as she walked. He rustled the papers on his desk.

Noun

He heard a rustle of leaves behind him.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

All of which will add to the already stunning view from the Tunnel Tops, where native grasses will rustle in the breeze amid mostly native trees, shrubs and gardens. Peter Fimrite, SFChronicle.com, "On the edge of SF’s Presidio, restoring a watershed will benefit nature and humans," 5 Aug. 2019 From talk of Little League to thoughts of autograph chases, delving deep into poignant childhood memories, there is something about the ancient sport that rustles the mind. Los Angeles Times, "The Sports Report: Baseball can be a comfort to those with Alzheimer’s," 29 July 2019 Then come the peaceful sounds of water spilling from a granite fountain and wind rustling through the leaves. Emily Young, Los Angeles Times, "A tranquil garden getaway amid the hustle and bustle of Westwood," 3 Aug. 2019 The splashy rhythms of water rushing over mossy boulders and flattened ferns complemented by bird calls and rustling leaves combine for a calming culmination of short trek with much to see. Mare Czinar, azcentral, "Forest hike near Payson leads to a shady tangle of springs," 26 July 2019 Most echolocation is at a very high frequency, and large ears amplify more low-frequency sounds, like rustling prey, says Aaron Corcoran, a National Geographic Explorer and research assistant professor at Wake Forest University. Liz Langley, National Geographic, "This animal has the biggest ears on Earth (relative to size)," 12 Apr. 2019 There, in the center, 250 Handmaids' gowns hang limp, lifeless in a row; rustling only when the breeze of someone rushing over to the Marthas whisks by. Lindsay Schallon, Glamour, "The Surprising Way the Trumps Inspired The Handmaid's Tale This Season," 5 June 2019 Teachers talk about being warned against wearing shoes that clack and clothes that rustle. Ann Doss Helms, charlotteobserver, "Cover the ABCs. Silence the kids. Test time in NC can be intense, teachers say.," 31 May 2018 Eventually, rustling ball gowns and trim tuxedos found their way to the dinner space, dressed in winter whites with branch-laden clusters for table arrangements—guests might have felt as though they had just stepped into a snow globe. Lilah Ramzi, Vogue, "The New York Botanical Garden Hosts Its 20th Annual Winter Wonderland Ball," 17 Dec. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The Musical, are filled with the rustle of tulle and chiffon. Raisa Bruner, Time, "Behind the Scenes of the Moulin Rouge! Musical With Its Star Costume Designer," 24 July 2019 Each noise becomes uncharacteristically augmented, including every finger snap, keyboard tap, or rustle of paper. Patrick Lucas Austin, Time, "We Tried Dolby's $600 Dimension Headphones. Are They Worth the Massive Price Tag?," 2 July 2019 This UNESCO Heritage Site falls into a peaceful quiet during the winter, broken only by the rustle of wind and the purrs of friendly neighborhood cats. Elizabeth Wellington, Vogue, "For Authentic Ibiza, Visit in the Winter," 15 Feb. 2019 Unfortunately, morning on the river starts before sunrise, when the boatmen fire up the outboards and the hornbills start squawking and the rustle of leaves hints at the primates feeding in the canopy. Paul Brady, Condé Nast Traveler, "Want Serious Bragging Rights? Do a Road Trip Across Borneo," 16 Nov. 2018 Save for the distant rumble of elephants and gentle rustle of leaves in the breeze. Mary Holland, Condé Nast Traveler, "Skybeds Let You Sleep Under the Stars on an African Safari," 24 Apr. 2018 The boreal owl's roundish face is disk-shaped, like a radar antenna bouncing the slightest rustle of twigs to the owl's ears. Ned Rozell, Anchorage Daily News, "During long summer days in Alaska, Boreal owls perform by daylight," 30 June 2018 The instructions cut through the rustle of rolling bodies, the coach, slope shouldered, ears puffy with cauliflower topography, shouting his pleasure. William D'urso, latimes.com, "Whether amateurs or the sport's best, MMA fighters flock to an Albuquerque gym known for producing champions," 21 May 2018 When Peck walked in, there was a rustle of excitement. Sasha Weiss, New York Times, "Justin Peck Is Making Ballet That Speaks to Our Everyday Lives," 10 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'rustle.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of rustle

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1624, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for rustle

Verb

Middle English rustelen

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Statistics for rustle

Last Updated

27 Aug 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for rustle

The first known use of rustle was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for rustle

rustle

verb

English Language Learners Definition of rustle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to make a soft, light sound because parts of something are touching or rubbing against each other
: to cause (something) to make a soft, light sound
: to steal (animals) from a farm or ranch

rustle

noun

English Language Learners Definition of rustle (Entry 2 of 2)

: a quick series of soft, light sounds caused when things (such as leaves or pieces of paper) rub against each other

rustle

verb
rus·​tle | \ ˈrə-səl How to pronounce rustle (audio) \
rustled; rustling

Kids Definition of rustle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to make or cause to make a quick series of small sounds Leaves rustled in the wind.
2 : to steal (as cattle) from the range

Other Words from rustle

rustler \ ˈrə-​slər \ noun

rustle

noun

Kids Definition of rustle (Entry 2 of 2)

: a quick series of small sounds From backstage you could hear the rustle of paper programs …— Richard Peck, A Year Down Yonder

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More from Merriam-Webster on rustle

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with rustle

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for rustle

Spanish Central: Translation of rustle

Nglish: Translation of rustle for Spanish Speakers

Comments on rustle

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