rustle

verb
rus·​tle | \ ˈrə-səl How to pronounce rustle (audio) \
rustled; rustling\ ˈrə-​s(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce rustling (audio) \

Definition of rustle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to make or cause a rustle
2a : to act or move with energy or speed
b : to forage food
3 : to steal cattle

transitive verb

1 : to cause to rustle
2a : to obtain by one's own exertions often used with upable to rustle up $5,000 bail— Jack McCallum
b : forage
3 : to steal (livestock) especially from a farm or ranch

rustle

noun

Definition of rustle (Entry 2 of 2)

: a quick succession or confusion of small sounds

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Other Words from rustle

Verb

rustler \ ˈrə-​s(ə-​)lər How to pronounce rustler (audio) \ noun

Synonyms for rustle

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of rustle in a Sentence

Verb The trees rustled in the wind. Her skirt rustled as she walked. He rustled the papers on his desk. Noun He heard a rustle of leaves behind him.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Belatedly, Trump is now trying to rustle the skeptics into a different frame of mind. Osita Nwanevu, The New Republic, "A Death Toll That Cannot Be Forgotten," 3 Apr. 2020 In their place, palm trees rustle and turquoise water stretches to the horizon. The Economist, "The synonymous crown affair As cases of coronavirus grow, what about cases of Corona beer?," 4 May 2020 Maybe your own innermost thoughts, or just the sound of the wind rustling through the trees outside. Aj Willingham, CNN, "All The Good Stuff that happened this week," 18 Apr. 2020 Sometimes all the interpreter could hear was the sound of rustling fabric. The New Yorker, "at the epicenter of the pandemic.," 27 Apr. 2020 Shafts of sunlight streamed through the rustling patchwork of lemon and saffron above us, and every breeze triggered the soft fireworks of fluttering golden leaves. Roger Naylor, azcentral, "Post-coronavirus, these Arizona travel experiences are at the top of my list. Here's why," 23 Apr. 2020 As Kevin De Bruyne is now back fit, their squad looks more than capable of rustling feathers this season. SI.com, "Champions League 2019/20: All 32 Team's Confirmed Squads," 4 Sep. 2019 Suddenly, a documentary became a multilayered environment, narration layered over a whole world of animal calls, trees rustling, and waves breaking gently on a beach. Adrienne So, Wired, "Just Get a Soundbar Already," 1 Apr. 2020 Birdwatching isn’t so hard: Listen for calls or rustling from trees or bushes, and look for movement. Lila Maclellan, Quartz, "Where to find delight during a coronavirus quarantine," 30 Mar. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun So why does Kay keep having strange, graphic dreams, and what's that odd rustle in the linen closet that catches Sam's eye? Leah Greenblatt, EW.com, "Emily Mortimer house horror Relic brings extra psychological layers: Review," 10 July 2020 When birdsong and the rustle of marsupials in the bush give way to an eerie, smoky silence. Besha Rodell, New York Times, "The Long, Slow Death of the Australian Auto Industry," 20 Feb. 2020 One tink of an arrow hitting your blind chair, or the rustle of a candy bar wrapper and his little brain might go into survival mode. Tony J. Peterson, Outdoor Life, "7 Tips for Bowhunting Turkeys this Spring," 9 Apr. 2020 Look at almost any photograph, no matter how banal, and the recognition comes on like an involuntary shudder, a snakelike rustle in the undergrowth of your unconscious. Sebastian Smee, Washington Post, "It’s time we looked at Iran through the same lens as its best photographers," 15 Jan. 2020 The cry of the distant goshawk, the rustle of flushing wings and the whistle of widgeon is our music. Steve Meyer, Anchorage Daily News, "A love affair sealed by dogs and duck hunts, and every bit as enduring and inspiring as the stuff of literature," 22 Feb. 2020 Inside a picture by Vuillard, for instance, quiet reigns, measured by the soft rustle of curtains and the sound of spoons stirring tea. Washington Post, "These painters found calm in an age of distraction — more than a century ago," 23 Dec. 2019 Modernity, bright and loud, drowned the night noises: the hiccup of geckos, the complaint of insects and the rustle of palms heavy with coconuts. New York Times, "Clay Pots Everywhere Quenched Myanmar’s Thirst, Until They Vanished," 10 Oct. 2019 The rustle of wind rushing through the eucalyptus trees, a non-native grove that shades the campground. Christopher Reynolds, latimes.com, "On Santa Cruz, California’s largest island, foxes play and a traffic jam is 6 kayaks," 9 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'rustle.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of rustle

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1624, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for rustle

Verb

Middle English rustelen

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Time Traveler for rustle

Time Traveler

The first known use of rustle was in the 14th century

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Statistics for rustle

Cite this Entry

“Rustle.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rustle. Accessed 7 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for rustle

rustle

verb
How to pronounce rustle (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of rustle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to make a soft, light sound because parts of something are touching or rubbing against each other
: to cause (something) to make a soft, light sound
: to steal (animals) from a farm or ranch

rustle

noun

English Language Learners Definition of rustle (Entry 2 of 2)

: a quick series of soft, light sounds caused when things (such as leaves or pieces of paper) rub against each other

rustle

verb
rus·​tle | \ ˈrə-səl How to pronounce rustle (audio) \
rustled; rustling

Kids Definition of rustle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to make or cause to make a quick series of small sounds Leaves rustled in the wind.
2 : to steal (as cattle) from the range

Other Words from rustle

rustler \ ˈrə-​slər \ noun

rustle

noun

Kids Definition of rustle (Entry 2 of 2)

: a quick series of small sounds From backstage you could hear the rustle of paper programs …— Richard Peck, A Year Down Yonder

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More from Merriam-Webster on rustle

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for rustle

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with rustle

Spanish Central: Translation of rustle

Nglish: Translation of rustle for Spanish Speakers

Comments on rustle

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