rhyme

noun
\ ˈrīm How to pronounce rhyme (audio) \
variants: or less commonly

Definition of rhyme

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a(1) : rhyming verse
(2) : poetry
b : a composition in verse that rhymes
2a : correspondence in terminal sounds of units of composition or utterance (such as two or more words or lines of verse)
b : one of two or more words thus corresponding in sound
c : correspondence of other than terminal word sounds: such as
(1) : alliteration

rhyme

verb
variants: or less commonly rime
rhymed also rimed; rhyming also riming

Definition of rhyme (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to relate or praise in rhyming verse
2a : to put into rhyme
b : to compose (verse) in rhyme
c : to cause to rhyme : use as rhyme

intransitive verb

1 : to make rhymes also : to compose rhyming verse
2 of a word or verse : to end in syllables that are rhymes
3 : to be in accord : harmonize

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Other Words from rhyme

Noun

rhymeless adjective

Verb

rhymer noun

Examples of rhyme in a Sentence

Noun She used “moon” as a rhyme for “June.” He couldn't think of a rhyme for “orange.” They're learning about meter and rhyme. Verb Please find the two lines that rhyme. She rhymed “moon” with “June.”
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The market didn’t have a tone nor tenor/rhyme nor reason for trading action. Brendan Ahern, Forbes, 3 June 2021 This process involves unmarked quotation and complex, allusive use of rhyme, meter, and linguistic register, all of which make her poetry extremely hard to translate. Sophie Pinkham, Harper's Magazine, 25 May 2021 Musicality drives The Off-Season, where Cole croons, hollers, and spits through a tangle of satisfying melodies and complex rhyme schemes. Mankaprr Conteh, Rolling Stone, 21 May 2021 So, in a sort of appalling rhyme with Lacy’s death, Bacon received similar news on the cusp of another great triumph. Joan Acocella, The New Yorker, 17 May 2021 Where many songwriters might turn to the simplest, almost nursery-rhyme-level lyrics to get the message across, Michaels does the opposite. Charlie Harding And Nate Sloan, Vulture, 4 May 2021 But Carmen, as Hill boasts in a rhyme (written by Sekani Williams, music by Kip Collins), is anything but common and her ambition to be a Hollywood actress outweighs her love for Hill, even though the man went to prison for her. Kathleen Newman-bremang, refinery29.com, 9 May 2021 The budget duties have been simplified, and the most fun aspects of franchise mode (trading, drafting, and signing players) have more rhyme and reason. Brian Mazique, Forbes, 18 Apr. 2021 And that’s going to rhyme, as Mark Twin supposedly said, with the present. Barbara Vandenburgh, USA TODAY, 5 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb But the loss of the rapper’s masters and rhyme books still stings. Elias Leight, Rolling Stone, 18 May 2021 The bubbling rhyme schemes and intricate storytelling of Bay Area staples like Luniz and Too Short were evident, but there was a dash of something close to Detroit rap’s rapid-fire delivery, too. Jeff Ihaza, Rolling Stone, 16 Apr. 2021 Teacher of the Year, acknowledged that Dr. Seuss books have their uses in children’s classrooms, particularly in helping teach kids high-frequency words and rhyme schemes. Eliza Fawcett, courant.com, 4 Mar. 2021 Also there are the first and last names that rhyme like Alice Dallas or Otto Amato, or first and last names that together make a word, like Justin Case. Sam Boyer, cleveland, 25 Dec. 2020 There's just something special about witnessing in real-time as celebrities discover all the pop culture icons that rhyme with their names. Andrea Park, Marie Claire, 22 Dec. 2020 The point of Heaney’s concluding phrase is that, of course, hope and history do not rhyme in any existing language. Fintan O’toole, The New York Review of Books, 26 Aug. 2020 The tenor of Robyn’s music seemed to rhyme with my own, often contradictory instincts, so much so that the experience of it struck me as indulgence. Rachelvoronacote, Longreads, 10 Aug. 2020 If, like us, your recollection of automotive lore‑the firing order of a 1970 Boss 302, for example—exceeds your recollection of ninth-grade algebra, then the green and yellow livery of this Lotus Esprit Turbo SE should rhyme. John Phillips, Car and Driver, 18 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'rhyme.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of rhyme

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for rhyme

Noun

Middle English rime, from Anglo-French

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Time Traveler for rhyme

Time Traveler

The first known use of rhyme was in the 13th century

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Statistics for rhyme

Last Updated

10 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Rhyme.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rhyme. Accessed 16 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for rhyme

rhyme

noun

English Language Learners Definition of rhyme

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: one of two or more words or phrases that end in the same sounds
: a poem or song whose lines end in rhymes
: the use of rhymes in a poem or song

rhyme

verb

English Language Learners Definition of rhyme (Entry 2 of 2)

: to have or end with the same sounds
: to have lines that end with the same sounds
: to use (a rhyme) in a poem, song, etc.

rhyme

noun
\ ˈrīm \

Kids Definition of rhyme

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : close similarity in the final sounds of two or more words or lines of writing
2 : a piece of writing (as a poem) whose lines end in similar sounds

rhyme

verb
rhymed; rhyming

Kids Definition of rhyme (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to end with the same sound "Bug" rhymes with "rug."
2 : to have lines that end with the same sound Not all poems rhyme.
3 : to cause lines or words to end with a similar sound He rhymed "moon" with "June."

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