reverent

adjective
rev·​er·​ent | \ˈrev-rənt, ˈre-və-;ˈre-vərnt\

Definition of reverent 

: expressing or characterized by reverence : worshipful

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Other Words from reverent

reverently adverb

Examples of reverent in a Sentence

a reverent crowd of worshippers a reverent tone of voice

Recent Examples on the Web

Yet his reflective, reverent writing offers a way of seeing and being in nature that provides a quiet complement to Gould’s legacy. Hugh Raffles, WSJ, "‘A Naturalist at Large’ Review: The Habit of Taking a Closer Look," 30 Aug. 2018 Brown Girl Surf also wants to create a more environmentally reverent surf culture and host beach cleanups and civic engagement events. Yasmin Nouh, The Root, "Brown Girl Surf Wants to Change Surf Culture," 30 May 2018 But the very fact that Solo doesn’t feel too overly Frankensteined, nor too overly reverent to the Star Wars mythos, should be fan-satisfying enough. Brian Raftery, WIRED, "Solo May Be Inessential, But It's Also Utterly Delightful," 23 May 2018 Hosted by Rihanna, Amal Clooney, Donatella Versace, Anna Wintour, and Stephen and Christine Schwartzman, the gala is expected to draw crowds of fashion and art lovers to the Metropolitan Museum in their most reverent ensembles. Vogue, "Met Gala 2018 Live Blog: Katy Perry Walks the Red Carpet in Six-Foot Wings," 7 May 2018 Faced with a flood of upset users, Google claimed that those holidays were too reverent for the jokey nature of a doodle. Avi Selk, Washington Post, "18 years of Google Doodles and the people who hate them," 2 Apr. 2018 The reverent note takes up all available space on the front and back of a kiddie-like greeting card showing a furry bunny holding binoculars looking out at the ocean. Doreen Christensen, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Crazed girls flood Parkland school shooter Nicholas Cruz with fan mail," 28 Mar. 2018 There are many anecdotes told of these services, most of a reverent nature. sandiegouniontribune.com, "Wind topples Mt. Soledad cross," 15 Mar. 2018 Some critics say that there has been disrespectful appropriation of the holiday for party hardy, less reverent needs. Craig Hlavaty, Houston Chronicle, "Everything you need to know about Dia de los Muertos or 'Day of the Dead'," 31 Oct. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'reverent.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of reverent

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for reverent

Middle English, borrowed from Anglo-French, borrowed from Latin reverent-, reverens, present participle of reverērī "to stand in awe of, revere entry 1"

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Statistics for reverent

Last Updated

17 Nov 2018

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Time Traveler for reverent

The first known use of reverent was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for reverent

reverent

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of reverent

: showing a lot of respect : very respectful

reverent

adjective
rev·​er·​ent | \ˈre-və-rənt, ˈrev-rənt\

Kids Definition of reverent

: very respectful reverent mourners

Other Words from reverent

reverently adverb

More from Merriam-Webster on reverent

Spanish Central: Translation of reverent

Nglish: Translation of reverent for Spanish Speakers

Comments on reverent

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